Thursday’s Headlines: De Blasio for President Edition

Mayor de Blasio rode the subway earlier this year to support congestion pricing to save transit. Photo: Gersh Kuntzman
Mayor de Blasio rode the subway earlier this year to support congestion pricing to save transit. Photo: Gersh Kuntzman

So you know the news: Mayor de Blasio announced his presidential bid this morning. (There were endless reactions hereherehere and Gothamist, but you have to give the Post editorial board credit for the sheer wrath of its headline, “All the reasons de Blasio’s 2020 presidential candidacy is a complete farce.”) After a stop on “Good Morning, America,” the mayor will have a no-media-questions event on Liberty Island, and then he’ll fly to Iowa and South Carolina for the weekend — so it’ll be at least until Monday before we can ask him the tough questions that the national media always forget (“When are you going to make a decision on the protected bike lane on Dyckman Street?” for example).

It’s always a little bittersweet when a little pol grows up and seeks the nation’s top office. We remember de Blasio when he was just our local councilman, standing tall — or at least taller than David Yassky — against  neighborhood graffiti. And now he wants to be president. Ah, the years pass!

One quibble: The mayor’s 3:07 campaign video gave far too big a co-starring role to his SUV.

It’ll be a busy day, so start with all the stuff that happened yesterday:

  • Really, are we supposed to believe the driver who killed a senior citizen? The Daily News is inclined to.
  • The Daily News added nice details about the teen cyclist who was killed in Borough Park on Tuesday. The paper also quoted the driver who killed him saying it was just “an accident.” Oy vey.
  • Mayor de Blasio is still bullish on his heavily subsidized ferry. (NY Post)
  • The Times offered a deep dive on Access-a-Ride.

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