Tuesday’s Headlines: Saying Goodbye to Jose Peralta Edition

All of New York’s political class*, will attend the funeral service for State Senator Jose Peralta, who died last week at age 47. We had a beef or two with Peralta, but he was a strong supporter of many street safety issues, including speed cameras. He will be missed.

Now, the news:

  • * Except for Peralta’s rival Jessica Ramos, who beat him fair and square in the September primary — she was turned away from his wake on Monday night. (NY Post)
  • Horrific carnage in Chinatown, as a driver — not a car, MSM, but a driver — killed one and injured six near Canal Street. (NYDN, NYT, amNY) The Post had some video. By early Tuesday, the NYPD said the driver had been arrested.
  • The Post echoed Streetsblog’s ongoing complaint that it’s next to impossible to find one of those great electric Citi Bikes.
  • NYC Transit President Andy Byford promised us more capacity on the 7 line, thanks to new signals — which promptly malfunctioned on Day 1. We guess no one told Byford that you have to open on the road! (NYDN, NY Post)
  • Let’s face it, Alec Baldwin is going to beat the rap for punching that guy over the parking spot, right? (amNY)
  • Our own DOT Commissioner Polly Trottenberg was honored as one of the Public Officials of the Year in Governing Magazing. (Insert snark about how Mayor de Blasio should listen to her more here.)
  • Friend of Streetsblog, @placardabuse, penned an op-ed in Gotham Gazette (under his or her Twitter handle!) demanding an end to rampant illegal parking by city employees. This seems to be the lowest of the low-hanging fruit in law enforcement, but no one does anything about it (the DAs don’t want to piss off cops because cops are needed to testify in criminal cases, and the mayor doesn’t want to piss off cops lest his already tenuous control of the NYPD crumble in dissent).
  • We need more loading zones. Everyone says it. Now there’s a report on it. (amNY)
  • One of the insurgent Democrats who beat a tired incumbent State Senator from Brooklyn proudly declares that he’s not a driver and will be exclusively using transit on the job. Can we have more leaders like Zellnor Myrie, please? (amNY)
  • Larry Littlefield

    New systems often have teething problems, so I won’t get upset about day one. Let’s see what happens a month from now. If it’s still failing as often as the old signals, we’re screwed.

    I worked on the budget documents for this one as a NYCT employee in 2003. That’s 15 years. Given the size of the system, to keep the signal system replaced every 60 years, a project of this size has to start — and finish — every year. Otherwise, the age of the oldest signals passes the point of dementia.

  • ohnonononono

    When exactly did NYC become a military junta of a city where the NYPD actually controls the mayor, who cowers in fear of their dissent? Did it happen under Giuliani? Under Koch? Was it a consequence of the crisis of the 70s, where crime and dysfunction and poverty drove us to put all our faith in an almighty physical authoritarianism? Or has it always been this way? Does it work this way in most other cities?

  • sbauman

    New systems often have teething problems, so I won’t get upset about day one.

    It’s also happened on day two.

  • AMH

    How exactly can old signals still cause delays once you’re running off the new computerized signals? And will two more TPH even approach the level of service that the IRT was running 100 years ago? Somehow I doubt it.

  • AMH

    How exactly can old signals still cause delays once you’re running off the new computerized signals? And will two more TPH even approach the level of service that the IRT was running 100 years ago?

  • AMH

    I don’t see where Myrie promises to use transit exclusively; he simply said he’ll be taking Amtrak between NYC and Albany.

  • Larry Littlefield

    CBTC was oversold. Theoretically it allows 40 trains per hour along the line, which the Flushing line once had.

    But in addition to line capacity, there is terminal capacity, train storage capacity — and financial capacity.

    The L is constrained by terminal capacity, which is why I wanted them to add tail tracks in Manhattan during the shutdown. They can only turn so many trains at the 8th Avenue interlocking, given how slow they have to approach the wall at the end of the station.

  • Joe R.

    The primary advantage of CBTC at this point seems to be to allow the trains to operate at their full acceleration and speed capabilities. If they can get over the line faster, you need fewer trainsets for any given level of service. Or conversely, you can increase the level of service with the same number of trainsets.

    Of course, you don’t need CBTC to allow trains to operate at their full capabilities but apparently the MTA doesn’t trust their operators to control train speed, instead relying on timers and detuned performance.

  • AnoNYC
  • Joe R.

    Cool! About 8 seconds for the train to pass a fixed point = ~50 mph. I remember back when they ran the Redbirds, which were never detuned, the expresses sometimes got to 55 to 60 mph. No speedometers in them, but I timed a few going through stations. Good to see the speed came back.

  • AnoNYC

    This is great. I hope people start noticing shorter trips on the day to day.

  • NYrByChoice

    Seriously?