Today’s Headlines

  • BMW Driver, 19, Kills Edwin Ajacalon, 15, Biking at 5th Ave and 23rd in Brooklyn (News, PostWNBC)
  • A Challenge for Andrew Cuomo: Let NYCT Transit Boss Andy Byford Do His Job (NYT)
  • Joe Addabbo Pressuring DOT to Weaken Woodhaven Boulevard Bus Lanes (QChron)
  • QChron Went Hunting for Rego Park Businesses to Badmouth Queens Boulevard Bike Lane
  • City Pulls East River Ferry Boats Out of Service to Fix Holes in Hulls (Post)
  • Rough Start for MTA’s New R179 Subway Train on First Day of Service (News)
  • Crumbling Station Wall at 86th Street in Brooklyn Disrupted N/R Service Sunday (AMNYNY1)
  • Hit-and-Run SUV Driver Critically Injures 71-Year-Old Man in Whitestone on Thanksgiving (News, Post)
  • DOT Adding Pedestrian Head Starts at 800 Intersections Per Year (NYT)
  • Daily News: Forget Cuomo’s Backwards AirTrain — Make the Q70 Free and Extend the N to LaGuardia

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Larry Littlefield

    “The lawmaker is asking that the offset and main roadway bus lanes that are now in effect 24/7 be changed to rush-hour only from Monday to Friday, that the curbside parking restriction on Saturdays be eliminated — he says “there is no ‘rush hour’ on Saturdays” and a lot of businesses are closed Sunday — and that lost parking spaces in front of commercial businesses along the boulevard be restored.”

    Counter proposal. Eliminate bus service in his district. Have the buses run express from the Rockaways to Liberty Ave.

    The MTA faces a financial crisis that is going to get worse. If you have local pols fighting against transit service, take it away until they are replaced by other local pols.

  • qrt145

    The NYT discovered that e-bikes are booming globally despite the backwardness of New York: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/23/business/e-bikes-electric-bicycles.html

  • Jeff

    LPIs are the only “Vision Zero” strategy I’ve seen truly rolled out at-scale, as opposed to the piecemeal approach we see with other safety interventions. I’m surprised there isn’t more pushback: I can definitely see it being phrased as “making the red lights longer” by some angsty Staten Island motorists who are convinced that the entire city government is a conspiracy theory to take away their SUV or whatever.

  • Fool

    I rather enjoyed this Market Urbanism Post:
    http://marketurbanism.com/2017/11/27/the-rent-is-too-high-and-the-commute-is-too-long-we-need-market-urbanism/

    “The only way to begin designing our cities better is to admit that democratic socialism is very bad at city design.”

  • HamTech87

    Agreed. And in suburban towns with regional rail, reduce service where those towns are not both upzoning and reducing parking minimums around stations. Enough with fostering sprawl and car-dependency in the suburbs.

  • HamTech87

    Not sure the Europeans would agree with this swipe at democratic socialism.

  • Fool

    As a EU Citizen I can verify that their Urban centers are also having an affordability crisis and lotteries for housing.

    Also our public transit systems are far more socialized than theirs.

  • Larry Littlefield

    As someone with a graduate degree in city planning, I have to face the reality that city planners are now advocating the exact opposite of what they advocated in the early days of the profession.

    Advocating what the market produced itself before land use regulation — mixed use, higher density, more efficient use of infrastructure.

    Basically city planning and environmental regulation were hijacked, and city planners are stuck trying to battle against their own rules, and granting exceptions (to the politically connected). This post is an absolute killer on the subject.

    https://granolashotgun.com/2017/11/13/mind-the-gap-2/

    Another killer.

    https://granolashotgun.com/2017/11/08/give-it-another-century-and-well-see-how-it-goes/

    The difference between the jurisdictions he writes about and NYC is that NYC has a “solution.” Buildings department corruption, and selective enforcement against the politically powerless until eventual legalization.

    Thus Streetsblog advocates for lower parking requirements, but somehow the Hasidm managed to build all the parking-free housing they wanted to in the area between Williamsburg and Bed-Stuy.

  • Larry Littlefield

    At least we got the third track approved, but the LIRR graft is still draining resources away from NYCT.

  • vnm
  • Fool

    Eh, I admittedly stopped going there when the already difficult parking got more difficult (park, rush in, pickup and rush out.). Anecdotally they did loose me as a customer when the bike line came in. Not something that has broken my heart.

    He should be advocating for higher meter rates so the parking spots on that strip have higher turnover. A lot of people do perform the park, rush in, pickup, and rush out action.

  • Vooch

    Typically cyclists spend more at local businesses than drivers – every survey shows this.

  • vnm

    Cyclists are burning more calories, so they should be hungrier.

  • Elizabeth F

    You have no idea what you’re talking about. I suggest you ride around on Metro-North, get off at each station south of I-287, and look at what’s around.

    Don’t both North of I-287. The cost of the train there is so high, it wipes out any savings you might have on housing. Better to build dense housing south of I-287.

    As for something CONSTRUCTIVE… why not help out on advocacy for bikes on the new TZB, as well as access to the bridge approach in Westchester County? Those to improvements combined have potential to get more people biking to the train in Tarrytown.

  • Joe R.

    When I have my 3,000 to 4,000 mile years I can eat 4,000 calories a day and not worry about gaining weight. Last few years I haven’t been doing that. End result means cutting down dramatically, especially on the snacks.

  • kevd

    did you look at refrigerators, joe?
    we’re all here to nag you about that.

  • Joe R.

    Going after I visit mom in rehab. Home Depot is about 0.8 miles from the rehab place.

  • Jeff

    10 miles a day burns a negligible amount of calories.

  • kevd

    Okay! Sometimes I need some reminding in order to get things done.
    Hope your mother is alright.

  • Joe R.

    At my pace I’m usually burning 700-800 calories an hour.

  • Joe R.

    I already planned this out last week. Once I make plans, I usually stick to them. I’ll let you know what happened when I get back.

  • Jeff

    Okay, so unless your pace is really, really slow, that doesn’t equate to burning that many calories. Certainly not enough to eat 4,000 calories a day and not worry about gaining weight.

  • AnoNYC

    Despite the crackdown, eBikes are booming here in NYC. The NYPD is only fighting the current as they become cheaper and more clandestine every year.

  • Vooch
  • kevd

    Is your point that there is a lot of denser, non-autocentric development happening around Metro North stations in southern Westchester?

    Because there sure as hell ain’t around LIRR stations.

  • Joe R.

    Actually when you add more muscle mass you also increase your resting metabolic rate. All I know is in a year where I ride a lot I eat whatever I want and don’t need to worry about gaining weight. In an off year I have to watch myself. Cycling isn’t my only exercise. There’s also walking for errands plus chores around house.

  • Joe R.

    Just got back. None of the Home Depots have the LG model I’m interested in on display. It’s on sale until Thursday. I may see if PC Richards has floor models. I can then order it online from Home Depot if I like it.

  • Larry Littlefield

    They make a heck of a lot of sense. The ratio of weight transported to the weight of the transporter is a hell of a lot more efficient than the average 4-wheel motor vehicle. To charge just plug in. And they are easier to park.

    You don’t have a huge trunk, and you are out in the weather, but if you aren’t a wimp about the latter e-bikes could replace a lot of trips by other modes.

  • Elizabeth F

    Yes, that’s my point. A lot of that development is now 80 years old, but some is still happening today. Particular in existing secondary urban centers: New Rochelle, White Plains, Stamford, etc. Because so many of the close-in locations are now built up, significant new densification would require ways to get people to the train stations from further away, probably by promoting bicycle use.

    LIRR and NJT; I used to live in NJ. NJ is a disaster. And with my limited experience on LI, it seems to be a 1950’s “paradise” (i.e. wasteland for anyone not in a car).