Today’s Headlines

  • Bus Driver Who Killed Dan Hanegby Charged Under ROW Law; Advos: Not Good Enough (Gothamist)
  • De Blasio Could Help Transit Riders Independently of Cuomo, If He Chose To (C&S)
  • Staten Island Advance Says Mayor’s Congestion Plan Is Lame, Endorses Move NY
  • BPP: De Blasio Using Vision Zero to Terrorize Immigrants; Mayor: Talk to Albany (@macartney)
  • … Or Working Cyclists Could Pool Their Resources to Buy Influence at City Hall and NYPD (PoliticoNYT)
  • City Council Mulls Options for Tighter Controls on Private Buses (AMNY)
  • Service on J and M Lines Delayed Yesterday by Man on the Tracks (Post, DNA)
  • MTA Botches Q23 Route Change (DNA)
  • Parents Want MTA to Change Rules for Baby Strollers on Buses (Post)
  • Suffolk DA Spota Resigns After Indictment for Interfering With Police Assault Probe (NYT)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • kevd

    I may have been struggling to find a point behind ahwr’s “look, here’s a hill!” comment – especially as no bus routes even run there.

  • qrt145

    Kids’ skulls are more likely to crack open from a fall when their parent has to carry them on one arm while holding the folded stroller with the other. If you think other passengers will always yield a seat to people in that situation, I have a bus to sell you! 🙂

    And if you are going to engage in extreme scenarios where stuff on the bus starts flying, I doubt there’s a whole lot of difference in outcome for kid in stroller vs kid in arms or lap.

    Strollers on buses are ubiquitous in other cities, but of course, it won’t work in NY because all buses here are driven by Sandra Bullock…

  • qrt145

    Must depend on the neighborhood. I see wheelchairs on the bus on maybe 25% of my trips time, and I’ve even seen more than one wheelchair at a time.

  • stairbob

    Yay, communism!

  • kevd

    they built plenty of horrible crap in East Berlin. but yeah, they do deserve a bit of credit for not ripping up tram lines.

  • bolwerk

    That’s unlikely, and to say the least a stroller can usually be leaned somewhere or, ideally, stored over one of the wheel compartments found on most buses. It doesn’t take much for a stroller to topple or roll away. A kid in a parent’s arms is in much less danger unless you really do get into extreme scenarios.

    Also note that I didn’t say strollers on buses should necessarily stay banned either. I just said the MTA isn’t being ridiculous in restricting them and the lack of perspective on the matter from activists is, well, the usual. There’s no reason to erase problems.

  • bolwerk

    Whether it’s actually desirable to have transit there or not, it looks like a good example of a block that might be a struggle for a level boarding application or an articulated bus – but probably would not be a challenge for a conventional high-floor bus.

  • kevd

    One need not have low floor boarding on every bus route in order to improve transit for most NYers. as you said, there are many tools in the tool box of which low floor boarding, more & larger doors, all door boarding and POP for busses are a few really inexpensive ones (as buses get replaced with some frequency)
    Currently we are using next none of the tools that pier cities are using.

  • bolwerk

    POP is certainly one no-brainer thing that should work splendidly on 100% of the surface transit system, make life better for literally everybody, and make everyone wonder why anything different was ever done before.

  • qrt145

    I suspect you don’t have a lot of firsthand experience trying to take a stroller onto a bus.

  • bolwerk

    Do or do not, there is no try!

    They have to be folded to even get on the typical bus, so there’s no logical way that unfolding them and taking up even more space makes them more convenient to store for the rest of the riders on the bus. If crowd conditions make storing a folded stroller difficult, they make storing an unfolded one more difficult. You’re still going from taking up the floor space of fewer than two people to the space of more than three people.

    I mostly don’t talk about my personal life, but what I can assure you I have oodles of firsthand experience with is people acting moronically with strollers on NYC buses. But literally any time I’ve ever carried a child on a crowded bus or train, at least one person voluntarily got up and insisted I take her seat (almost always it’s a woman). Contrary to most people’s preconceptions, I bet that wouldn’t happen if I were a woman!