Today’s Headlines

  • Bill de Blasio’s NYPD Is Out to Punish People for Biking (MetroDNA)
  • New Yorkers Try Shaming Mayor Into Building Protected Bike Lanes (AMNY)
  • De Blasio Knocks Road Pricing in Embarrassing Debate (NYT 1, 2; PoliticoWNYC; NY1)
  • Related: Opponents Attack Mayor for Not Caving to Cuomo’s MTA Extortion Gambit (Post)
  • MetroCard Machines Were Still Down Yesterday (Post)
  • DiNapoli Report: NYC Bridges Need $20B in Repairs (Post)
  • Driver Who Killed Heather Lough: Right of Way Law Violates My Rights (Gothamist)
  • NYPD Blames Victim After Driver Runs Over Child in East Flatbush (DNANY1Post)
  • 13 Kids Hospitalized When School Bus Drivers Crash in the Bronx (Post)
  • No Bike Project Is Too Innocuous to Attract NIMBY Ire (Tribeca Trib)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Vooch
  • newshuman

    Really disappointed by the lack of press regarding last night’s fifth avenue demonstration. It was a really great turn out. Way more than AMNY’s estimation of 100 (not complaining — amny’s coverage was mostly positive).

    The demonstration proved what’s possible when enough people feel strongly about a certain issue but sadly DeBlasio probably won’t even hear about it. He’ll be too busy reading about his pointless debate last night.

  • Guest

    I was nauseated when reading that Legal Aid is bringing this constitutionality challenge against the failure to yield law (upheld 22 of 25 times it was contested!!), and the language they use talking about “just an accident” and having to protect the future of a killer driver who makes a living by driving, and horrifyingly apparently intends to continue to do so… Way to use your scarce resources and stick up for the little man, Legal Aid. I’ve donated in the past but will never ever do so again.

  • Reader

    De Blasio has no idea what Vision Zero is or how to achieve it. Crackdowns on cyclists won’t accomplish anything.

    We need a new mayor.

  • Morris Zapp

    Too bad the democratic process is so corrupt that not one of the infinitely more thoughtful and qualified Dems in NYC would dare challenge a sitting a mayor in the same party.

  • JarekFA

    Sad thing is, everyone else running against him is objectively worse . Even “progressives” like Tish James, who’s positioning herself for 2021, is bad on this issue.

  • ohnonononono

    Not only did de Blasio repeat the lie that he hasn’t seen a congestion pricing plan to comment on, but neither Malliotakis or Dietl wanted to discuss congestion pricing either when the panelist asked them. So de Blasio isn’t wrong in seeing no political upside to supporting it.

  • Simon Phearson

    I agree. I’ve done work for them in the past; I will avoid doing so in the future. Not only are they representing the wrong people here, but the argument they’re making is transparently sophomoric.

  • Maggie

    One thing that struck me about the DOT’s response to urgent requests for safe space to bike on Fifth Avenue in Midtown: the community board requested this in December 2013. Nearly 5 years later (!!!!!), here’s de Blasio’s DOT chastising “advocates” for being impatient about wanting to bike down Fifth safely.

    If Citibike or electeds are wondering why women in particular aren’t biking much to work in Midtown, having to sit through the Vision Zero/climate friendly mayor’s ENTIRE TERM to get to that letter, is part of the reason.

    Fifth Ave will be filled with tourists and residents alike on bikes, and the carrying capacity of the street dramatically expanded, from the very first day that NYC DOT uses our hard-earned tax dollars to incorporate safe space for biking on this world-class street.

  • stairbob

    I’ve never voted for de Blasio, and this year won’t be any different. Too bad there are not any better options. I guess I’ll write in Janette Sadik-Khan again, unless anyone has a better idea.

  • Joe R.

    The more I think about it the more I think 5th Avenue should be pedestrianized along its entirety. Maybe have one lane for buses and another for delivery/emergency vehicles but that would be the extent of motor traffic. Widen the sidewalks by 10 feet on either side, add a bike lane, bollard off the minor side streets on the side with the bike lane, remove the traffic signals as they apply to bikes/peds on that side (no need for them given that there is no cross motor traffic).

    If this experiment is successful, do the same treatment on other avenues. By staggering the side the bike lane is on, alternate avenues would have motor vehicle access to minor side streets. Vision Zero and reductions in air pollution will never be realized unless we aggressively close off more and more of the city to nonessential motor traffic. 5th Avenue seems a great place to start.

  • AnoNYC

    5th Ave should be BRT with expanded sidewalks. Deliveries late night only.

  • Maggie

    My take when I walk Fifth: I’d love to see analysis of fixing the lights so that pedestrians no longer get stopped for Every Single red light. First, it’s hostile, and second, simply letting pedestrian traffic be more naturally distributed instead of creating clogs of people at every signal would ease a lot of the 5th Ave crowding. I don’t know that it’s the sidewalk width here, I think maybe it’s stopping pedestrian flow 20x a mile.

    Plus, a lot of people are walking Fifth just to see it, and would no doubt switch to seeing it by bike, experiencing more and faster, if that didn’t feel like a stressful ride/certain death.

    If you compare the DOT mode counts to the theoretical capacity of different modes, it’s fascinating how well they line up.

    DOT, southbound morning rush hour on 5th Ave crossing 57th, # of people per hour:

    on foot: 1481 people
    bus: 2329 people
    taxis/for hire: 1275
    private car: 675
    bicycle: 87
    total: 5847 people
    excluding pedestrians: 4366 people, 4 lanes

    Theoretical lane capacity per hour:
    private cars: 600-1600 (DOT is accommodating 1950)
    buses in mixed traffic: 1000-2800 (DOT saw 2329)

    vs capacity options in a complete street design:
    dedicated bus lane: 4000-8000 people/hour
    protected bike lane: 6500-7500

    Last of all, it is RICH that this administration, which ought to see a doctor for its blind spot on congestion pricing proposals, would yet again fall back on using bus commuters as their argument for eliminating space for bikes. If ONLY there was some proven way to speed transit, cut noxious emissions, and increase the carrying capacity of a finite, currently unpriced resource….

  • Joe R.

    Agreed about the pedestrian flow. The only issue I’m seeing here are the same issues which come up when we talk about retiming lights for cyclists, namely there is a huge variation in walking (and cycling) speeds. Moreover, tourists seeing the sights aren’t going to maintain any consistent speed. I think it’s better to just bollard off the minor side streets, perhaps on both sides of 5th. Vehicles can still access them from 6th or Park, although they’ll obviously need to make a u-turn when getting out. This gets rid of the traffic signal issue entirely, at least until you hit the major cross streets. It breaks up the grid, which would have the positive effect of discouraging driving. It speeds up buses/bikes, again a desirable outcome. And of course, it avoids the pedestrian traffic jams every block.

    Yeah, if the goal is moving people, and not private cars, then we have lots of options if only this administration would lose its blind spot.

  • kevd

    its definitely a second term policy. one that has long term benefits for the city and the many people will end up supporting after they see its benefits – but that the mouth-breathers will freak out about because its from Europe or something

  • kevd

    several dems did challenge him.
    they all lost….
    by
    A LOT.

  • AnoNYC

    DOT expanding bike lanes heading to Randalls Island

    http://bronx.news12.com/story/36574837/dot-expanding-bike-lanes-heading-to-randalls-island

    Video about new protected bike lanes in Mott Haven. Consistently blocked on camera.

  • Fakey McFakename

    The DiNapoli report is a red herring. “Functionally obsolete” is bridge-building industry jargon for “let’s widen the lanes and increase car speeds”