Today’s Headlines

  • De Blasio Says Vance Placard Bust Is Part of His Phony Crackdown (DNA)
  • Post: Abuse of Legit Parking Permits a Bigger Problem Than Fake Ones …
  • … Though Anyone Can Exploit NYC’s Broken, Corrupt System (DNA)
  • How Often Does the Times Say a Criminal Defendant Was “Hauled Into Court”?
  • De Blasio Just Doesn’t Think Abuse of Official Driving Privileges Is a Big Deal (Post)
  • Motorist Kills Clifton Martin, 74, on Rockaway Boulevard; NYPD: “No Criminality” (DNA)
  • Unlicensed Dump Truck Driver Severely Injures Cyclist in Williamsburg (DNA)
  • Hoylman Says State DOT Is Looking at West Side Highway Safety Fixes (AMNY)
  • Don’t Expect CB 11 to Quit Griping About Northern Boulevard Bike Lanes Anytime Soon (QNS)
  • MTA Plan to Improve Subway Service by Making Riders Stand Is Underway (NY1, Gothamist)
  • Journalist Ross Barkan Announces Run Against Marty Golden, Equivocates on Toll Reform (VoiceNews)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Driver

    Yes, and those 20 days the cycle commuters will choose transit. Either transit has the capacity for these commuters, in which case there is no benefit in reducing the number of transit commuters, or transit does not have the capacity for these commuters, which means a cluster fuck for everyone.

  • bolwerk

    But those are anecdotes. The big picture is few people would use it for commuting. Why make the entire mode worse by targeting the people less apt to use it?

  • Driver

    Safer to cycle in the snow than drive? You are out of your mind.

  • Vooch

    Dude

    you rock

  • Vooch

    Great data –

    not as big a drop as the naysayers suggesting

  • Driver

    “Weather which brings roads to a near standstill” That’s something you just made up. There’s much less auto traffic during any significant snow event than usual, and if you have the ability to drive in it (front wheel drive, all season tires) it’s a non-issue.

  • Vooch

    how
    many subway riders manhattan to manhattan ?

  • bolwerk

    Okay, what’s your plan to get New York’s job density to compare to Munich’s?

    I don’t understand focusing on this. You can get orders of magnitude more cyclists by encouraging recreational use. Some of them will even flip to commuting maybe, if things go well.

  • Vooch

    that’s why driving is outlawed during snowstorms

  • bolwerk

    YES. And that’s where bikes should be focused. Where they have maximized chances of getting riders.

    This is a great idea that everyone who isn’t injecting heroin needles full of liquefied fossil fuel into their veins* should agree on.

    * this population probably includes ITDP

  • Vooch

    my plan ?

    add 100 miles of PBLs ar a cost of $50 million

    add 100 miles to this network https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/305b259101ced8de04de24d5fc7e0f7b0aebd7cefb031800cc30f6a28c84a977.jpg

  • JarekFA

    Every year I see more and more people joining me on my commute. Of course less in Winter but so long as the trains remain hot garbage and cycling is seen as a viable option . . . .

  • JarekFA

    I schvitz like a khazer on the platforms in the summer. So I might as well bike if I’m gonna sweat.

  • Driver

    Median trip distances for work in the “rest of the city” are
    Brooklyn 3.4
    Bronx 4.3
    Queens 5.1
    Staten Island 4.9
    Nobody actually travels “as the crow flies”

  • Driver

    The rainy days are not bringing daily ridership down by 6k (a mere 28%), it’s bringing the AVERAGE down by 6k. That means it brings daily ridership on rainy days down by significantly more than that.
    Tuesdays through the month of April: 6,581; 24,714; 22,459; 5,493. You’re right not much drop there.

  • Vooch

    25% drop

    shoot subway likely drops also in the rain

  • Vooch

    sure you don‘t know this guy ?

  • Andrew

    Rainy weather too; ever try finding an uber during a downpour? Completely booked, and these are people that would presumably be walking otherwise.

    That doesn’t mean that people are “really skittish” – it just means that the demand for Ubers is slightly higher when it’s raining than when it’s not, which is a very reasonable conjecture.

  • bolwerk

    Okay, but how will that affect commuter modeshare for bikes? Is the number, as a percentage of total commuters, even more than a rounding error from zero?

  • bolwerk

    In daytime Manhattan especially? It probably means someone doesn’t want their work clothes wet or their mascara to run. I don’t see why that’s unreasonable.

  • bolwerk

    I don’t think anyone here is against expanding the PBL network. But making a case today it requires coming to grips with who the likely users are. They just are not commuters. What’s wrong with that?

  • Vooch

    the relevant metric is not mode share. Rather it’s percent of roadway traffic. If we are trying to improve efficiency of system, that is only useful metric.

    In the only area with even a modicum of a PBL network, lower manhattan, cyclists are 15-40% of roadway traffic.

    Sit on First Avenue during rush hour and you‘ll observe cyclists consistently outnumber motor vehicles.

    Latent Demand for cycling is enormous. PBLs cost pennies,

    Add 100 miles of PBLs and you will see similar roadway share throughout the city. Millions of NYers will have increased mobility for less cost than a consulting study.

  • bolwerk

    We were talking about the commuter modeshare. It was even your point about Munich. Nobody is saying there isn’t a lot of potential cycling demand. The point is it’s not replacing the subway and buses for commuters.

  • Vooch

    citibike data strongly suggests commuting cycling is real and prevelant.

    200 miles of PBLs is never going to replace 1,200 miles of subway.

    PBLs can only provide a alternative to subway for commutes less than 3 miles and only for a minority subset of those subway riders.

    BUT given that the median commute distance in Manhattan is only 1.6 miles, isn‘t it reasonable that PBLs

  • Vooch
  • djx

    You’re exemplifying the problem with too many commenters here: you can do it easily, so you think many/most other people will feel the same way.

    It’s an approach to public policy that involves not actually listening and observing, but telling (and, in your defense) modelling what you think should be

  • JarekFA

    You’re exemplifying the problem with too many commenters here: you can do it easily, so you think many/most other people will feel the same way.

    Wow, it’s almost like you have no idea what you’re talking about? Just painfully stupid. The policy should be making it easier for people to bike commute so that we have less cars on the road which, as we see, leads to incessant congestion and all the other issues (pollution etc . . . ). I wouldn’t necessarily say it’s super easy. I think the biggest barrier is the city makes it as difficult as possible to bike commute but the car drivers act like they’re victims.

    I see ridiculously high bike volumes when I commute. I’m not joking when I say I see (and I literally counted this the other day), over 20 bikes going through Jay St. in downtown BK in the evening rush, while only 3 cars were there. The bikes completely filled the bike lane and the travel lane. We get that much bike commuting volume NOW, even though, the bike infrastructure is unsafe garbage.

    The demand is through the roof but the biggest barrier, is, as you actually identified, is that, the lack of infrastructure makes it harder then it need be. My wife is Dutch and bikes everywhere when we’re in Holland. But she doesn’t even feel comfortable to ride on 5th ave in BK which has a bike lane (even though I also see tons of parents with kids on their bikes taking that exact route every morning) But the demand is there. The city needs to step up instead of trying to fellate car drivers every chance they get.

    Just today I had to take the train because I left my bike at work. Took me 50 minutes even though I live a short walk from my local. On bike, it takes me 26 minutes. Other people recognize the time and cost savings. If only the city would step up and do its part instead of continuing to privilege the car drivers by allocating as much road space to them, at the expense of everyone else and especially necessary deliveries.

  • JarekFA

    There are some bike zealots here that can bike in any weather, and that’s great!

    I don’t think I’m a zealot per-se. Just honest about my priorities. My local is closed for 6 months so cuomo can install wifi and usb ports. So my walk is like 12 mins to the local instead of 3 mins. If my 3 min walk local were still open, I probably would’ve taken the train more during rainy weather. But with my local being out, I’m looking at a 12 min walk and then up to a 10 min headway during the morning rush (I took the train today and it was a 10 min headway during the morning rush). So that’s 22+ min wait before I’m on a train whereas biking takes me only 26 minutes. I hate waiting. My time is valuable. But these are all the little considerations we take. I hate wasting my time so I’m more willing to endure a little raininess then I am willing to endure being treated like a fucking sardine on a humid, rainy, damp platform with 300 of my neighbors.

  • reasonableexplanation

    A 26min bike ride ain’t terrible. It’s nice to live close to work! For us poor south Brooklyn shlubs working in midtown, it’s a choice of a 45 subway commute or about a 65min bike ride, which is not really an option most days.

  • qrt145

    You do realize that dgx’s comment was in response to you saying “I bike commuted virtually every day this past winter. As long as it’s not 25 or colder and/or windy or precipitating it’s fine.”?

    It is fine *for you*. It is fine for me, too (I haven’t seen a day in NYC that is too cold to bike for me in years). But it is demonstrably not fine for many (most?) people, even people who are happy to commute by bike at other times of the year. Maybe some of them will eventually change their minds, but belittling them today with “oh please” comments won’t help.

  • qrt145

    Like Churchill used to say, biking is the worst form of commuting, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time! 🙂

  • JarekFA

    No, this is hog wash and it’s more a matter of perception then anything else. https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/2cf2f2360f5113ecabdfbdb5b643d245bd6b43dff33c0b1403ceee332372e347.png

    I conceded that you’ll lose some people to the cold. I won’t bike if it’s too cold. But we can walk to the train in 30 degree weather, right? So really, what’s the issue? You get a jacket that breathes. You put on some long johns. Get some gloves. It’s basically the same shit as walking. Look at the cities with the highest bike commuting levels in the US.

    Minneapolis/St. Paul. Madison Wisc. Both places much colder and snowier (and I don’t ride when there’s slick snow either) then here. I really don’t know what’s in dispute? I’m saying, get us some good infrastructure and more people will bike. People are trapped. People are forced to take shit trains that break down. People feel like they’re forced to have to drive or take a car. PBL will free people. Fuck, I had to take the train this morning and I feel like the MTA stole time out of my life.

  • kevd

    Having seen how many NYC drivers deal with snow, I would bet that only a small minority have all weather or snow tires.
    Seriously, their competence in snow is as laughable as that of Southerners.

  • reasonableexplanation

    Basically all cars in NYC have all weather tires. (Summer tires are really uncommon). All weathers suck in the snow.

    Some northern places mandate that between certain months all cars must have snow tires on. I would support adding that rule here.

  • kevd

    I would support instructions telling NYers that flooring it till your wheels spin is not the best way to get out of snow…..

  • Joe R.

    Just out of curiosity, does anyone use chains any more? Even if they don’t give more traction over winter tires, they tend to have the benefit of slowing traffic to a reasonable pace for the conditions. I see far too many people still driving at 50 mph when the streets are full of slush and possible patches of black ice.

  • reasonableexplanation

    Chains are illegal here and in most places: they tear up the roads.

    Also, c’mon man, you’re not seeing people go 50mph on snow days, or not for long anyway!

  • qrt145

    They are still used in Switzerland. 🙂

  • Vooch
  • Vooch

    so build & maintain a trillion dollar system to match capacity of less than 5% of the time ?

    or spend 1/200 of the trillion and create PBLs supporting mobility 95% of the time ?

    not rocket science