Today’s Headlines

  • Development Corporation Will Oversee Gateway, With Feds and Amtrak to Pay Half (NYT, Politico)
  • AMNY Amsterdam Bikeway Coverage Leads With Parking; DNA Runs With IRL Angle
  • Brooklyn Greenway Hits NIMBY Opposition at CB 1 Meeting, Brooklyn Paper Gleefully Reports
  • TA Calls Out 109th Precinct Victim-Blaming (DNA); Gothamist: 109th Is Ticketing Fewer Drivers
  • Today: Council Hearing on Rodriguez Bill to Study Light Rail (News)
  • Daneek Miller Thinks the MTA Should Lower Fares at Commuter Rail Stations Within City Limits (Post)
  • Post: Carl Heastie Aims to Help Assembly Dem Incumbents Fend Off Primary Challenges
  • New Program to Spruce Up City Park Entrances and Improve Pedestrian Access (News)
  • Yellow Cab Crash Injures Five in Carroll Gardens (News)
  • David Greenfield Revives Bill to Grant Parking Privileges to Pregnant Motorists (DNA)
  • SI Electeds, AWOL When Drivers Kill, Spring to Action When Drivers Are Inconvenienced (Advance)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • stairbob

    “Daneek Miller Thinks the MTA Should Lower Fares at Commuter Rail Stations Within City Limits”

    Maybe a good idea. Perhaps Mr. Miller can include this in his support of MoveNY.

  • > Brooklyn Greenway Hits NIMBY Opposition at CB 1 Meeting

    Ah, I wish I hadn’t missed that meeting, I’d have loved to have spoken in favor of the plan. Anyone know if it’s a planned topic for future meetings?

    West St. is so dangerous due to the very local industries complaining that the greenway would inconvenience them too much. They have a lot of nerve. Especially since, for property owners, a safer neighborhood with better options for getting around will only serve to increase their property values. Opposing the Greenway like this only makes sense if you only do business here, live somewhere else, and don’t care how it affects residents.

    And this:

    > “I don’t think it’s a viable plan at this point, especially with all the construction going on,” said Vincent Gangone, chair of Community Board 1’s transportation committee.

    I loathe our unelected community boards, but if we have to have them, why is this guy the chair of the transportation committee? This is his baseline attitude, “not viable?” Please. It’s only not viable because you, non-transportation export, said so. DOT, the experts, say otherwise. They are managed by the mayor we all elected, and you are a local somebody that nobody voted for.

  • Bolwerk

    Absolutely. Furthermore, this is where all the people with a fare zone stiffy should finally have their tantric relief. NYC should be zone 1 and all trips further out should be in zone 2, zone 3, etc., getting progressively more expensive. That way a rider should be indifferent to whether s/he takes the subway, a bus, MNRR, or the LIRR within city limits to a destination within city limits. That is, indifferent except for what provides the best ride.

  • Bolwerk

    Andy Cuomo to NYC: drop dead. New Jersey needs your capital funds.

    He probably thinks he’s helping Christie’s presidential campaign or something. He really does seem like THAT kind of an asshole.

  • R

    This was my favorite part:

    “Part of Commercial Street is also about to blow up with the massive Greenpoint Landing mega-development, which will bring around 5,500 new units of housing to the waterfront over the next decade — meaning construction traffic for the foreseeable future, and flood of new pedestrians, cars, and cabs once they’re built that would further clog the slimmed-down street, residents said.”

    Note that a flood of cars and cabs are just a given. If only there was some way to prepare for the future and offer people transportation alternatives so they didn’t have to bring a car with them when they move in.

  • I’m so sick of Greenfield’s never-ending support of parking. It’s tiring. Is he term-limited yet?

  • Rick

    Yep. The current fare structure makes absolutely zero sense. Nobody is going to take LIRR when it’s $5 instead of $2.75. Sure, it’s faster than the subway, but that’s canceled out by the longer headways and the fact that it only drops off at one point in Manhattan (someday it might be 2 points, if East Side Access is ever completed).

  • Reader

    Perhaps no man has ever been so obsessed with parking without understanding a single thing about how it works.

  • JudenChino

    http://www.dnainfo.com/new-york/20151111/upper-west-side/protected-bike-lane-could-run-along-amsterdam-from-72nd-110th-st-dot

    Gary Greengrass, who owns the famous bagels and smoked fish store Barney Greengrass, said he does not support the plan.

    To him, the Columbus Avenue bike lane seems already very dangerous.

    And taking away parking spaces would hurt him. “As a small business, we have people who drive to our place,” he said.

    Who in the fucking world honestly takes a private car and parks on the street to get their bagel & lox? Really? Nobody. I’ve been there once. Do you know how I got there? I biked. We shouldn’t set aside our extremely valuable street space for the ocassional person who might choose to drive and park to go to Barney Greengrass? Anyone who drives and parks to pick up their bagel and shmear is an idiot or so ridiculously rich they don’t need free street parking. Seriously. Who’s picking up bagels in their car?

    This is the UWS. Strollers. Yuppies. Families. We’re talking massive volume of potential customers who would use the bike lane. And this fucking guy pitching a shit because he wants to make sure his customers from Westchester, LI and NJ can park for free on the street? Seriously, what an asshole. Seriously. Are we, you’re actual neighbors, non-entities? Who the fuck do you think uses this bike lane? Zombies, delivery guys and fixie riding non-bagel eating hipsters?

  • ZB

    Yea I saw his comments and was similarly like wtf. Never going there again, regret all the completely over-priced mediocre food and unfriendly service I experienced in the name of ‘authenticity’.

  • bolwerk

    Ha, damn right.

    I bet cops, politicians, some government employees, taxi drivers, and maybe the limousine set all do it. Taking into account the perception of business owners who think a lot more people do it, and the media’s bias toward that view, we’re talking about probably 99% of the say in this matter going to maybe a few percent of the population.

  • Mark Walker

    Most of his customers walk there. I’m one of them.

  • Matthias

    My thoughts exactly. Business owners make this false claim all the time, when actually they are the ones parking there all day and preventing potential customers from using the space. They’re much better off with easy foot/bike access and a few metered spots that turn over frequently.

  • Matthias

    That park improvement site is awesome. There are so many parks that need more/better entrances, improvements to make them inviting. I may have gone a little crazy putting down dots.

    http://www.nycgovparks.org/planning-and-building/planning/parks-without-borders

  • JudenChino

    When I’m biking on the UWS on a lazy weekend, I’m just looking for excuses to stop and spend money and enjoy the free day (coffee, beer, brunch, bagel, someplace quiet to read a newspaper or tablet, watch the game, enjoy the fresh air)..

  • fdtutf

    Business owners make this false claim all the time, when actually they are the ones parking there all day and preventing potential customers from using the space.

    I think you may have hit on the actual reason retail business owners fight so hard to keep parking in front of their stores.

  • sbauman

    That’s why family businesses rarely survive the third generation.

  • I think it also has to do with how vocal – and angry – car drivers can be. Even if they’re a minority of a store’s customers, they’re the ones who are going to complain if the store is hard to access. Anyone who arrives on foot, by bike, or via transit isn’t likely to ask to speak to the owner and say, “You know, Gary, it was so easy to walk over here from my apartment!”

    A store might have only 1% of its customers arrive by car, but 100% of those customers will probably complain if they can’t find parking easily enough.

  • Jonathan R

    Certainly business owners are not looking for changes to the status quo that make it more difficult for any particular group of customers to arrive. Especially for appetizing, where large catering orders probably make up 75% of the day’s business.

    The more apropos question is whether the city’s policy should support more accessible appetizing over measures that could preserve the lives of many of its slower-moving citizens.

  • BBnet3000

    I prefer “converted” or “reallocated” personally.

  • Matthias

    Absolutely agree. Have you noticed that bus stops are never removed but rather “consolidated”? Semantics do make a difference.

  • Matthias

    There’s a great quote from CB9 transportation committee co-chair, Tim Thomas, in response to complaints about losing a trivial number of parking spaces in the Empire Blvd plaza plan. “This is about safety. There are walkers, bicyclists getting killed at these locations. From now on, please keep it in mind when you talk about your cars.” So glad somebody (a CB member no less) is calling people out on their crap.

  • D’BlahZero

    This: Business owners … are the ones parking there all day and preventing potential customers from using the space.

    I wish reporters would challenge this BS with, “so you park far away, or avoid driving to work so that there’s more room for your customers’ cars?”

  • Maggie

    His comments in person were even worse. They were jaw-droppingly callous. On a night where most people spoke in favor and a few people spoke out against, there were four or five outliers who came across as get-a-grip level hostile, or like, stuck in 1962 or in 18th century pre-war France. I thought he was by far – by far – the worst.

    The comment was like, well, I’m a small business owner. So someone died (4-year-old Ariel Russo) but who cares, it’s just ONE person who’s died on Amsterdam (wrong), I mean come on, let’s not overreact, it’s not a huge deal, and as a small business owner I don’t care.

    He didn’t say what business he owned, so kudos to Emily Frost for reporting on the business to go with his comments.

  • Andrew

    The comment was like, well, I’m a small business owner. So someone died (4-year-old Ariel Russo) but who cares, it’s just ONE person who’s died on Amsterdam (wrong), I mean come on, let’s not overreact, it’s not a huge deal, and as a sma ll business owner I don’t care.

    Every neighborhood has its Allan Rosens.

    He didn’t say what business he owned, so kudos to Emily Frost for reporting on the business to go with his comments.

    The last name is a good clue.

  • Andrew

    Many NYC car owners justifiably consider parking to be their greatest challenge. They sometimes forget that, for a majority of New Yorkers (and a significant majority of Upper West Siders), parking isn’t a consideration at all.

  • Kevin Love

    Perhaps you should reconsider who gets your business.