Today’s Headlines

  • De Blasio Opens Up Big Lead in New Q Poll (NYT)
  • Errol Louis: Criminal Charges for Reckless Drivers “Extreme,” But NYPD Needs to Staff Up CIS (News)
  • Times Summarizes Where Mayoral Candidates Stand on Bikes, Subways, and Outer-Borough Taxis
  • Daily News Goes on a Bike-Share Ride with Adolfo Carrión: “It Is a Bit Dangerous, Of Course”
  • Former Koch Transportation Commissioner Ross Sandler Chairs Newly-Revived City Club (NYT)
  • 2nd Avenue Sagas: “This Group Is Going After the Fund Designed to Boost Transit Capacity”
  • Brooklyn Paper Covers State DOT’s Decision to Support Ocean Parkway Pedestrian Safety Improvements
  • In the Bronx, a Gruesome Case of Using a Car as a Murder Weapon (DNAWSJ)
  • Speeding Driver With Suspended License Punches Cop at Canarsie Traffic Stop (Bklyn Daily)
  • Injured Queens HS Student Sues DOE for Hiring Reckless Bus Company, Failing to Stop Driver (Gazette)
  • Nadler Wants City to Limit Number of “Intrusive” Double-Decker Tour Buses (NYT)
  • Ian Turner

    Did Albanese drop out of the race?

  • Kevin Love

    Zero tolerance policies and criminal prosecutions for people who kill is “extreme”!!??

    Because death is not an “extreme” condition?

    In my opinion, what is “extreme” is tolerating violent, dangerous criminals who kill.

  • Reader

    I’ll give Errol Louis credit here. He’s advocating for traffic enforcement and investigations as a “forgotten issue,” placing it within the realm of public health and safety, and he’s right. Few other journalists are inserting this issue in to the campaign and he deserves some praise for taking it up in the pages of the Daily News.

    I suspect that his opinion on criminal prosecutions stems from the fact that he either drives or is driven many places. (Hello, press placard!) As such, he may not want to think that what he might consider to be a simple mistake could result in time behind bars. Any advocate could easily explain the difference between honest-to-god accidents and the type of reckless driving that should be subject to automatic criminal prosecution, but we should cut Louis some slack here. This is major progress!

  • Bolwerk

    Don’t think so. But I’m not expecting any last-second rallies either.

  • Car Free Nation

    It’s time to see if the All Powerful Bike Lobby can move the needle. Here we have a leading candidate (De Blasio) advocating for both Vision Zero traffic deaths and a serious expansion of cycling mode-share.

    I think it’s time to show him some love.

  • ToastPatterson

    Has de Blasio given back the money he took from cycling foes Randy Mastro and Jim Walden? I don’t trust him. He’s telling liberals what they want to hear but he has no track record of accomplishing anything, was invisible as public advocate, and was apparently afraid to make any decisions as Hillary’s senate campaign manager. I think he’ll be a disaster as mayor. Barring a miraculous rally by Sal Albanese I’ll be holding my nose and voting for Quinn. At least she’s accomplished some things on the city council. Assuming de Blasio gets the nomination, I’d even consider voting Republican for the first time in my life and going with Lhota.

  • krstrois

    What worries me about DeBlasio is his all-purpose inclination to subsidize. This almost always heads in a car-oriented direction. I’m waiting for someone who understands that progressive transportation policy doesn’t mean automatic subsidies that are designed to right historic wrongs, but actually contribute to their perpetuation. If you don’t support a congestion fee (and he doesn’t), you contribute to the continuation of inequality, whatever you say to the contrary. And you also demonstrate you’re kind of chicken shit about really changing anything. So, he worries me. Because he seems small-time. And he’s hiding it in rhetoric that appeals to a good 90% of my friends.

  • krstrois

    What worries me about DeBlasio is his all-purpose inclination to subsidize. This almost always heads in a car-oriented direction. I’m waiting for someone who understands that progressive transportation policy doesn’t mean automatic subsidies that are designed to right historic wrongs, but actually contribute to their perpetuation. If you don’t support a congestion fee (and he doesn’t), you contribute to the continuation of inequality, whatever you say to the contrary. And you also demonstrate you’re kind of chicken shit about really changing anything. So, he worries me. Because he seems small-time. And he’s hiding it in rhetoric that appeals to a good 90% of my friends.

  • krstrois

    What worries me about DeBlasio is his all-purpose inclination to subsidize. This almost always heads in a car-oriented direction. I’m waiting for someone who understands that progressive transportation policy doesn’t mean automatic subsidies that are designed to right historic wrongs, but actually contribute to their perpetuation. If you don’t support a congestion fee (and he doesn’t), you contribute to the continuation of inequality, whatever you say to the contrary. And you also demonstrate you’re kind of chicken shit about really changing anything. So, he worries me. Because he seems small-time. And he’s hiding it in rhetoric that appeals to a good 90% of my friends.

  • 1ifbyrain2ifbytrain

    Do any of the candidates support congestion pricing? I did a quick google but only saw that Quinn “sort of” does.

  • Anonymous

    At least she’s accomplished some things on the city council

    Like what? 5 minute grace periods for parking meters?

  • krstrois

    Quinn hedges, like always. “I don’t see it coming back” super passive. Lhota is hilarious about it, if you like black humor. He thinks Everything Else Should Be Done First, like putting wifi everywhere so people will be attracted to options other than driving. He’s got it backwards, I’m sure intentionally. More on Quinn here:

    http://www.capitalnewyork.com/article/politics/2013/02/7784800/christine-quinn-wont-touch-congestion-pricing-anymore

  • Driver

    In the Bronx, a Gruesome Case of Using a Car as a Murder Weapon

    Unless the suspect stabbed the victim with the car, I think this headline is inaccurate.

  • Bolwerk

    Based on his mostly level-headed stint as MTA chair, I don’t think anything Lhota says on the campaign trail can be taken seriously. If there is one thing that might unify Republikans in NYC, it’s opposition to anything they perceive as costing them their “freedom” to drive. He has to pander to them, while trying to find ways to entice or at least not ostracize sane people.

    That said, I wouldn’t vote for the guy either.

  • kevd

    Massive tax-payer gifts to developers!
    “Accomplishing things” is not necessarily beneficial if what you’re accomplishing is negative.

  • ToastPatterson

    You’re right, things like passing a living wage
    bill, requiring hospitals to help uninsured patients, protecting women’s
    reproductive rights, supporting immigrant rights, and increasing oversight of the
    NYPD don’t matter. Let’s just bask in de
    Blasio’s hollow rhetoric because it makes us feel good.

  • Anonymous

    Didn’t the bike in buildings law pass under her watch? (Whether that counts as _her_ accomplishment, I don’t know.)

    I wouldn’t commute by bike if it weren’t for that law.

  • kevd

    Hey there chief.
    Who said I believed de Blasio’s hollow rhetoric. He’s just about as insipid as she is!

  • Anonymous

    http://www.streetsblog.org/2009/07/29/in-historic-vote-city-council-passes-bicycle-access-bill/

    The bill passed 46-1 so not sure how much we can credit her for that. It was sponsored by David Yassky.

    She did support congestion pricing but her position on it now is such a politician’s position, that it’s hard to give her credit for her prior stance.

    De’Blasio said he wouldn’t have supported the prior congestion pricing bill (though, he did’t explicitly say he was anti-congestion pricing altogether), which isn’t the best position either.

  • Sean Kelliher

    Thanks for writing this. I was thinking something similar, but probably could not have said it so well.

    Without measures such as congestion pricing and parking and placard reform, improving conditions for pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit users will be politically and fiscally difficult. Proposals to improve conditions for them will be rebuffed with the sentiment that these are nice ideas, but there just isn’t the space or money for them. I hope voters realize this.

  • guest

    Regarding the Canarsie bullet – is criminality suspected?