Today’s Headlines

  • Renee Thompson, 16, Killed By Turning Tractor-Truck Driver on UES; No Arrests (News)
  • Alleged Drunk Driver Charged With Manslaughter for Death of Woman Clinging to Car (Times Ledger)
  • EDC Seeking Proposals for Development of Seaport City (Crain’s, CapNY, WNYC)
  • MTA Tells Maloney It’s Committed to Phase 2 of Second Avenue Subway (2nd Ave Sagas)
  • MTA Now Has Less Insurance for Disasters Than It Did Before Sandy (WNYC)
  • Taxi Association Files Suit in Another Attempt to Block Taxi of Tomorrow (WSJ)
  • Observer and Next City Report on the Forum for Urban Design’s Next New York Proposals
  • MetroCard “Green Fee” Has Raised Almost $11 Million Since March, Cut Number of Cards Sold (News)
  • 2nd Ave Sagas: Is The R Train Ferry to Sunset Park Viable or Necessary?
  • Urban Omnibus on Why SBS Is Not “True” Bus Rapid Transit
  • Diktator Al-Assad Launches Syrian Bike-Share Program (The Onion)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • The only time a truck driver will be cited for a death is if the casualty is a passenger or driver in another car. That’s how the NYPD thinks.

  • KeNYC2030

    It’s reassuring to know that the tentacles of the All-Powerful Bike Lobby extend all the way to Damascus.

  • soexcited

    Citibike breached 41,000 rides yesterday! There definitely aren’t enough bikes.

    https://www.citibikenyc.com/system-data

  • carma

    at some point, nyc bike share is going to have to stop accepting new members b/c honestly there arent enough bikes.

    or…. start purchasing more bikes (and more stations)

  • Michael Ludwig

    It’s great to see a city that is “positively begrimed.”

  • R

    Mexico City’s bike share put a cap on membership and limited the system to annual subscribers. I think they have around 4,000 bikes. NYC may have to do the same.

  • Ian Turner

    Like parking, at some point the number of bikes will become a limiting factor to new memberships. But remember, more memberships = more revenue = more money for expansion.

  • Anonymous

    The Daily News trying to make the new card fee sound like a negative spun it as an environmental initiative because they knew their readers would fall for it and be pissed off. And the lemmings commenting on that article did not disappoint.

    There are many environmental benefits to cutting the number of cards distributed. However, even without those it just makes sense for the MTA to do this. As one of the people interviewed mentioned, it has dramatically reduced the MTA card litter and has also reduced MTA costs. It isn’t a big deal to keep using the same card, (as evident from the fact that all the MTA riders interviewed have successfully done so) and if you lose a card, the $1 fee is barely a huge increase on the base fare of an MTA trip.

    It is a rather benign nudge, which reduces MTA costs, saves some people money (since a lot of them are now using up the few cents which are usually left over, and over the course of a few months can easily add up to a couple of trips), helps the environment, and is hardly a huge burden on people who screw up and lose their old card.

    Of course, being a good and sensible action, the News and its readers are all against it, and its totalitarianism inducing effects.

  • carma

    catch 22.

  • Joe R.

    Does anyone know how many bikes are out of service at any given time, and for what reason? I recall saying before bike share started that flat tires will end up being the major reason bikes are out of service, and this could have been avoided by going with airless tires. If this is indeed the case, that still holds true.

  • moocow

    Charge for plastic bags next please.

  • Anonymous

    Yous guys missed another good Editorial in AMNY today (which for some reason is not currently on their regular site, but here is the “online print version” http://edition.pagesuite-professional.co.uk/Launch.aspx?PBID=4af0aa34-706c-410d-a9ff-f93a3c23b1c7).

  • Driver

    The card gets rubbed in my wallet and fails to work after a while. For this reason I just buy a new card. To pay $1 for something that costs pennies, if that is bothersome to me. Although this is the MTA, so they are probably paying $0.50 for something that should cost pennies.

  • Ian Turner

    I’ve been using the same EasyPay metrocard for 18 months now with no problems. Sure it looks a little beat up but it swipes OK.

  • Greg

    We really have no idea; the available data feeds aren’t accurate or robust enough to know with any confidence.

    According to the data there tend to be 700ish docks at any given point that aren’t “available”. What exactly “available” means is not officially defined anywhere.

  • Peter

    The MTA card fee is fine, I get it, but there’s no way to re-fill a card for the JFK Airtrain. Believe me, I’ve tried. That $5 monorail is now a $6 monorail every time.

  • Mike

    Wha!? Just use a regular MetroCard with at least $5 on it. Or buy a 10-ride pass for $25 ($26 with new card fee).

  • Mike

    And it’s not a monorail.

  • Cold Shoaler

    You will be issued a new MetroCard at no charge if your card is expiring or damaged. http://web.mta.info/nyct/fare/FaresatAGlance.htm

  • Driver

    You have to mail in the damaged card and they eventually mail you a new one. You still have to buy a new card in the meantime, and it’s still a hassle when your card wont swipe, especially if you are taking the bus and can’t simply buy another card on the spot.

  • moocow

    We should get one, Shelbyville has one.

  • Anonymous

    In some cases you can get a replacement card on the spot, if you go to the human-operated booth at the station.

  • Bolwerk

    Mode ideologues are absurd. SBS isn’t “true” bus rapid transit the way bus rapid transit isn’t true rapid transit, if you want to be anal about it.

    The fact is, whatever its shortcomings, SBS is a simple, affordable, convenient alternative to NYC’s conventional local bus routes and “true BRT” isn’t; it’s largely about elevated/subway capital costs with bus labor costs, with virtually no added benefit over SBS. The only thing majorly wrong with SBS is the label: it should just be “bus service,” not “select” bus service.

  • Bolwerk

    Mode ideologues are absurd. SBS isn’t “true” bus rapid transit the way bus rapid transit isn’t true rapid transit, if you want to be anal about it.

    The fact is, whatever its shortcomings, SBS is a simple, affordable, convenient alternative to NYC’s conventional local bus routes and “true BRT” isn’t; it’s largely about elevated/subway capital costs with bus labor costs, with virtually no added benefit over SBS. The only thing majorly wrong with SBS is the label: it should just be “bus service,” not “select” bus service.