Today’s Headlines

  • Prendergast Confirmed as MTA Chairman and CEO (TransNat, News)
  • Citi Bike Sets New Record, Approaches 50,000 Members and 1 Million Miles (Citi BikeNews)
  • East Village Crash Victim Sedated for Operation; DWI Suspect Arrested in Hospital (News)
  • After Court Decision, TLC Votes Again to Support Modified Taxi of Tomorrow (News)
  • Bloomberg Doesn’t Answer Question About Expanding Transit to New Development (Advance)
  • MTA, EDC Reject Bay Ridge Ferry Idea During R Train Outage (News)
  • Bloomberg’s Anti-Flooding Levee Would Bottle Up Coney Island Ferry Idea (Bklyn Paper)
  • Police Searching for Wrong-Way S.I. Suspect Who Rammed Police Car (Advance)
  • New Bike Lanes Striped on 222nd Street, From Bronx River to Co-Op City (Bronx River Alliance)
  • The Times Asks: Does Amsterdam Have Too Many Bikes?
  • No One Does Bike-Share Like NYC (NY Mag)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Anonymous

    The number of bikes in the bike parking lot next to the train station in Amsterdam truly is astonishing.

    Part of it is that many people park one bike at each train station in their commute: they commute by bike to the origin station and park a bike there, take the train, and then take the other bike that they left at the destination station. This avoids having to take the bike on the train. As much as I like taking my bike on the train, it probably wouldn’t be practical if everyone did it.

    Still, like Mr. Koorn said, “You cannot imagine if all this traffic were cars.”

    In the meantime, New Yorkers have to fight over parking sign poles and the like to park a couple of bikes while the Dutch get specially built bike parking lots for thousands of bikes…

  • Jared R

    ^ 1 million miles?

  • John

    Maybe the Times should ask: Does USA have too many cars??

  • Anxiously Awaiting Bikeshare

    The free bike parking situation in Amsterdam is identical to the free car parking in the US
    in that both induce demand for their respective form of transportation.
    The one key difference: Biking is a far healthier and more
    environmentally friendlier way of transportation so it is an activity
    society should induce demand for.

  • Anonymous

    Citi Bike saved me half an hour minimum on two trips this weeks. And that’s why I’ll keep using it. And why it’s going to be huge success: it’s convenient, safe, fun, and an amazing time saver. The city is different now.

  • Anonymous

    Citi Bike saved me half an hour minimum on two trips this weeks. And that’s why I’ll keep using it. And why it’s going to be huge success: it’s convenient, safe, fun, and an amazing time saver. The city is different now.

  • Anonymous

    Citi Bike saved me half an hour minimum on two trips this weeks. And that’s why I’ll keep using it. And why it’s going to be huge success: it’s convenient, safe, fun, and an amazing time saver. The city is different now.

  • tyler

    I lived in Belgium for 2 years… 5 bikes stolen! I did have one for almost a year. But they are cheep to replace because, I assume, you’re buying stolen bikes. 🙂

    But I digress. I commuted to Brussels about twice a week and the “bike barn” in my city was truly impressive. Half a football field long, double racks (lower and upper). The police periodically “tagged” the bikes and removed those that didn’t get moved after a week — to free up space. I guess some of those bikes were ones for sale at the Saturday markets as well!

  • tyler

    I lived in Belgium for 2 years… 5 bikes stolen! I did have one for almost a year. But they are cheep to replace because, I assume, you’re buying stolen bikes. 🙂

    But I digress. I commuted to Brussels about twice a week and the “bike barn” in my city was truly impressive. Half a football field long, double racks (lower and upper). The police periodically “tagged” the bikes and removed those that didn’t get moved after a week — to free up space. I guess some of those bikes were ones for sale at the Saturday markets as well!

  • tyler

    I lived in Belgium for 2 years… 5 bikes stolen! I did have one for almost a year. But they are cheep to replace because, I assume, you’re buying stolen bikes. 🙂

    But I digress. I commuted to Brussels about twice a week and the “bike barn” in my city was truly impressive. Half a football field long, double racks (lower and upper). The police periodically “tagged” the bikes and removed those that didn’t get moved after a week — to free up space. I guess some of those bikes were ones for sale at the Saturday markets as well!

  • Albert

    “Too Many Bikes?”:

    Leave it to the media to invent a downside to something with pretty much no downside. The Times article appears to be saying that “too many” bicycles is the moral equivalent of too many cars. I guess too much malaria vaccine is equivalent to too much malaria. All those ugly, disorganized vials.

    Buried in the article are the actually important points, like, “You cannot imagine if all this traffic were cars.”

  • Albert

    “Too Many Bikes?”:

    Leave it to the media to invent a downside to something with pretty much no downside. The Times article appears to be saying that “too many” bicycles is the moral equivalent of too many cars. I guess too much malaria vaccine is equivalent to too much malaria. All those ugly, disorganized vials.

    Buried in the article are the actually important points, like, “You cannot imagine if all this traffic were cars.”

  • Albert

    “Too Many Bikes?”:

    Leave it to the media to invent a downside to something with pretty much no downside. The Times article appears to be saying that “too many” bicycles is the moral equivalent of too many cars. I guess too much malaria vaccine is equivalent to too much malaria. All those ugly, disorganized vials.

    Buried in the article are the actually important points, like, “You cannot imagine if all this traffic were cars.”

  • Anonymous

    Bike parking and infrastructure is so much cheaper than car infrastructure, when you look at it in terms of cost per user. Even if most people have 2-3 bikes parked in public places, that still requires much less space than 1 car.

    Yes, the relative cheapness of bikes means people will be more prone to abandon them, but removing derelict bikes is not that hard of a problem to solve.

    Amsterdam probably needs some demand management, in the form of pricing, at least for the most popular bike parking locations. But I’d trade car parking for bike parking problems any day.

  • anon

    Wow, there isn’t even a place to lock up a bike at the Metropolitan Museum here.

  • Daphna

    The NY Daily News article about Citi bike is good: it reports facts! Kudos to reporter Pete Donohue.

    The NY Daily News article about Mohammed Azad, the victim of Shaun Martin’s sidewalk driving, highlights the problem with the language used to describe vehicular crimes. The subtitle states “Shaun Martin… lost control of a Nissan Altima, jumped a curb on Second Ave, and blasted into the sidewalk flower shop”. The “lost control” language serves to partially exonerate the driver. That sentence would have been better as “Shaun Martin, driving a Nissan Altima, jumped a curb on Second Ave, and blasted into the sidewalk flower shop.”

    The rest of the article goes on to report that a “runaway rental car plowed into this curbside flower shop” or a “Nissan Altima jumped a curb on Second Ave… and blazed a path of destruction on the sidewalk…” The reporter attributes the actions to the car instead of the driver, which serves to take blame off the driver. This language around motorist behavior needs to change.

  • tyler

    I don’t think ‘demand’ management is really appropriate for this. That would be akin to adding, say, a €3 surcharge for the trams that go to
    Amsterdam Centraal to get less people to ride the streetcar to the station. Remember, the reason all of the bikes and scooters emerge from this area is because folks are commuting to the city center. You don’t want to make it harder, thus encouraging less desirable forms of transportation. Folks that live in the outskirts of A’dam could also drive to work. They don’t. Zij gaan fietsen!

  • Anonymous

    According to the article, the problem is mainly with lack of enough bike parking to meet demand, and this situation is a result of the prevalence of people who have multiple bikes that they leave at the stations, as well as abandoned bikes.

    If this is true, then charging for bike parking in the most popular areas, like around the major commuter stations, would result in freeing up some space. Even a small charge could result in freeing up significant space as people would have an incentive to remove their bikes if they don’t really need to park them at those stations.

    A charge of a few EUR per day, or maybe even less for long term parking, would probably not cause many people to switch from bike to car, but might cause a lot of people to get ride of one or more extra bikes that are parked at the station.

  • tyler

    It is pretty funny how this fairly manageable problem in Amsterdam is being latched onto by the American press as “what goes wrong when transportation policies run amok!” Really, we’re talking about some major “pinch points” in the city that have an exceptional amount of traffic (bicycle or otherwise) — the area around the central station?! Wow, i’m shocked. People go there? Commuters come and go from the city center there!? What?!

    But for the most part, Amsterdam looks more like this… Here’s a scene from Westerstraat in the Jordaan neighborhood.

    http://goo.gl/maps/VHIH5

    Pretty idyllic, no? Cafe culture, some car parking, lots of bike parking, cars and bikes on the street in harmony, picnic tables on the median strip… and there’s even a guy recycling a bottle. It’s like a damn progressive environmentalist’s wet dream.

    And in the old parts of the city, you get lots of this…

    http://goo.gl/maps/Uqsx3
    http://goo.gl/maps/7yLZn

    Folks locking bikes to the canal railings… Is that a problem? Much ado about nothing.

  • tyler

    I think you could do plenty with increased monitoring or some sort of simple registration system (without added labor) without having to create a fee structure. A fee structure also creates *expectations* — i.e., you want something extra if you’re now paying for it.

    I mentioned in another post that police in my city in Belgium would periodically tag the bikes in the “bike barn” at the train station. If they weren’t moved/used/claimed (i.e., the tag taken off) in a week or two, they were removed.

  • Daphna

    If Greg’s feed is correct, https://sites.google.com/site/citibikestats/ , then two new docking stations were installed in the last couple days and brought online yesterday. West 31st St and 7th Ave was left in a “planned” state and not physically installed at launch. I think so was East 15th St and 3rd Ave. Both still show orange as “planned” on Alta’s map but Greg’s feed shows them online. Did anyone see the docks put in at these two locations on Wednesday??

  • Anonymous

    I noticed that about the Cloisters too. There’s a nice bike lane through Ft. Tryon Park to get there and then nothing. On the day that I went we had difficulty finding posts that weren’t already doubled up. Plenty of parking though. I guess those dowagers that run the Met don’t like bikes, but Amsterdam it ain’t!

  • Daphna

    I checked out these two stations. Neither was there as of 6/18. Both were installed 6/19 and brought online 6/20. Neither had the thermoplast line or flexible delineators on 6/21. On 6/22 (Saturday) the painted line and bollards were added. This is terrific because these are 2 docking stations that were not installed prior to launch. These are not stations where the docks had been put out but not activated – rather these are locations with docks just put in just days ago. These are 2 of the 20 stations that were supposed to have been part of the 330 station launch but were left out. I am pleased that these 2 new stations were installed in the last couple days. I hope this means the other 18 stations on the Alta map as “planned” will be installed shortly.

    Also: on 6/22 Saturday – new record: 30,187 rides in a single day even with only 4,358 bikes in the system. So far 45,548 annual members. Even a Connecticut paper covered the news: http://www.greenwichtime.com/news/article/More-than-1M-miles-logged-by-NYC-bike-share-users-4617305.php