Today’s Headlines

  • Bloomberg Unveils Storm Resiliency Plan (Observer, Post, News, WNYC, NYT)
  • WNYC Estimates That 10% of Citi Bike Stations “Flatline” Each Day; Post Notices Power Outages Too
  • Bay Ridge Community Board Committee Backs Fourth Avenue Traffic Calming (Bklyn Daily)
  • Livery Driver Jumps Curb in Longwood, Injuring Mother and Child on Sidewalk (News, DNA)
  • Prendergast to Meet With Senate Committee Chair, But No Hearing as Session Winds Down (WNYC)
  • LES Community Board Asks DOT to Fix Grand Street Back-Ups, Examine Bike Lane Removal (Lo-Down)
  • S.I. Wheel Clears Community Board With Greenway, HOV, Road Widening Requests (Advance)
  • Hunter Professors: 60 Percent of Manhattan Bicyclists Use Helmets (News)
  • Nicole Gelinas Talks to Bike Lane Skeptics (City & State)
  • A New Yorker Examines Bicycling Around Paris, And Finds It Isn’t So Different From NYC (WSJ)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Ian Turner

    Regarding grand street, seems like the best solution would be to toll the Williamsburg bridge.

  • Anonymous

    Jeeze, NYC buried the most important, or at least useful, bit in the middle of their story:

    http://project.wnyc.org/bike-share-map/index.html

    Live map showing likely dead stations basically automating the same “flatline in primetime” methodology we’ve been doing manually with the oobrien.com map.

  • Bluewndrpwrmlk96

    Regarding the Lo-Down article, removing the bike lane on Clinton Street to speed traffic on Grand Street to the Williamsburg Bridge, whatever advantages that are to be gained from that will be extremely short-lived.

    The problem is signal-timing on Delancey and too many drivers using only one route to enter the bridge. Traffic agents can work as well, because they have the ability to shut down a particular street and redirect traffic elsewhere (ie: Norfolk St or Essex).

    A more hi-tech solution can be to install an illuminating no-right turn sign prohibiting drivers to turn depending on traffic conditions that can be monitored by the DOT.

    Regarding the SI Advance article, looks like a good idea. I see good potential for the SI North Shore region.

  • Ridgewoodian

    WSJ: “Only later did it occur to me that the first bike I’d taken had its seat at the lowest setting, and rotated 180 degrees from the anatomically usual position. That was an unofficial signal from a previous rider that, rather than raise and rotate the seat, I should leave it for another bike.”

    I like this. I’ve had a couple of bikes thus far that have had mechanical difficulties (slipping out of 3rd gear). I’m sure this will become more of an issue as the bikes age. Perhaps we should adopt this convention.

  • Ridgewoodian

    WSJ: “Only later did it occur to me that the first bike I’d taken had its seat at the lowest setting, and rotated 180 degrees from the anatomically usual position. That was an unofficial signal from a previous rider that, rather than raise and rotate the seat, I should leave it for another bike.”

    I like this. I’ve had a couple of bikes thus far that have had mechanical difficulties (slipping out of 3rd gear). I’m sure this will become more of an issue as the bikes age. Perhaps we should adopt this convention.

  • Stacy Walsh Rosenstock

    Is DesignBoom a Daily News advertiser? They might have served their readership better by providing links to a site that actually allows people to purchase helmets, or better yet, a list of events where DOT distributes helmets for free.

  • Stacy Walsh Rosenstock
  • Bronxite

    Exactly. I don’t see how removing the two-way “protected” bicycle lane would improve conditions if drivers are already illegally utilizing it as additional moving lane.

    East River tolls and congestion pricing are the only solution to increasing traffic volumes in this area for the short term.

  • Daphna

    I wonder why there were so few bikeshare trips yesterday? It was a nice day with just a little period of rain in the afternoon. I would have thought citibike riders would have taken around 16,000 trips instead of 8,482.

  • Daphna

    Regarding the Lo Down article: the DOT previously sought to relieve some Williamsburg bridge bound traffic off of Norfolk and instead encouraged motorists to turn on Clinton. There was likely the same back-up on Grand before as now, but it was spread out over more blocks and a little less noticeable. The real problem is the heavy volume of traffic heading to the free bridge.

    The Transportation Committee of CB3 wants the DOT to examine the intersection of Clinton and Delancey and wants the DOT to consider removing the 2-way bike lane on Clinton to be replaced by an extra lane for motorists and instead just sharrows for bikes or re-routing bicyclists to another street.

    As others pointed out in the Lo Down comments sections, bicyclists can not be re-routed to another street because the only bike/ped entrance to the bridge is at Clinton.

    If re-routing traffic from Norfolk to Clinton is creating a back-up, then let motorists go the old way pattern of turning north on Norfolk to head to Delancey. Removing the 2-way bike lane on Clinton from Grand Street to Delancey should not be an option. The Transportation Committee of CB3 needs to be educated so that they will understand that an extra lane of motor vehicle traffic will not solve the problem. Motorists tolerate a huge amount of congestion for their free bridge usage. An additional lane will induce demand and more will drive and congestion will reach the same place it is now. At a certain level of congestion, some drivers are deterred, but with less congestion, more will choose to drive until the same level of congestion arises. Congestion will always come to rest at the same tipping point, no matter how many lanes. Vital bike infrastructure should not be removed in a misguided attempt to lessen motor vehicle congestion.

  • Eddie

    There could be a one-way bike lane going north on Clinton to the bridge, and cyclists could take Suffolk going south to Grand. The median on Delancey continues until Suffolk.

  • Anonymous

    I was wondering that myself. Did the glitches get everyone too paranoid to use the system?

  • Bronxite

    Do you suggest removing the 2-way protected bicycle lane to reduce traffic or prevent illegal utilization by automobiles?

    Adding an additional moving lane to Clinton St will not work. Even when drivers illegally utilize the bicycle lane as a moving lane, there is still congestion.

    The best way to keep automobiles out of the bicycle lane is to install bollards at the entrances.

    The best way to reduce traffic in that area period is congestion pricing/East River tolls.

  • Greg

    I noticed that as well, but in the end I dont think a single day is enough of a sample point to draw meaningful conclusions on.

    Let’s see how the following day or two look.

  • Ex-driver

    Or cancel the SPURA redevelopment and use that site as a giant holding zone for cars waiting to cross the bridge.

    How’s that for “cost of congestion”?