Eyes on the Street: Runoff Retention? Sidewalk Extension!

Photo: Clarence Eckerson, Jr.

Clarence files these photos of a dual-purpose street reclamation in Queens.

In Woodside at the intersection of 39th Ave and Woodside Avenue they have put in a massive traffic calming/bioswale-ish extension of the sidewalk! It looks like a standard Portland-style bioswale for water runoff.

We have queries in with the city for more information, but as Clarence says, it looks like this is another in a series of joint ventures between multiple agencies — DOT, DEP and Parks — designed to absorb runoff while taming traffic. The initiative is a product of PlaNYC.

Though this one looks mostly complete, says Clarence, “It looks like they haven’t removed the sharrow just yet, which will put you right into a curb.”

Photo: Clarence Eckerson, Jr.

More shots after the jump.

Barring any major breaking news, this will be our last post until Thursday. Happy Independence Day, everyone.

Photo: Clarence Eckerson, Jr.
Overhead view of intersection before installation

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