Public Hearing on Downtown Brooklyn Parking Reforms

Brooklyn Community Board 2 hosts this public hearing on a proposal to lower parking minimums in Downtown Brooklyn.

From CB 2:

IN THE MATTER OF an application submitted by the Department of City Planning pursuant to Section 201 of the New York City Charter, for an amendment of the Zoning Resolution of the City of New York, relating to Article X, Chapter I (Special Downtown Brooklyn District) to modify the parking regulations of the Special Downtown Brooklyn District, in the Borough of Brooklyn, Community District 2.

The proposed zoning text amendment has three main components:

  1. to reduce the minimum parking requirements for new residential developments from 40 percent of new housing units to 20 percent of new units to better reflect low-car ownership and demand for parking in Downtown Brooklyn;
  2. to encourage the development of mixed income and affordable housing by eliminating parking requirements for affordable housing units; and
  3. to provide more flexibility to locate required accessory parking off-site, to build small underground public garages and to allow accessory parking garages to all residents, workers and visitors in Downtown Brooklyn.

Learn more about the Downtown Brooklyn Parking Text Amendment
Read an overview of the proposed text amendment
View a map of the study area and the current zoning (PDF)
View a slide show presentation on the proposal (HTML)
View a slide show presentation on the proposal (PDF)
Read the proposed text amendment (PDF)
Read Article X, Chapter I (Special Downtown Brooklyn District) of the Zoning Resolution (PDF)

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