Today’s Headlines

  • PATH Posts Record Ridership After Toll Hikes, Reinvestment (WSJ)
  • State Says No Environmental Harms in Transit-Free Tappan Zee (Transpo NationLoHud)
  • Without Red Hook Customs Station, More Truck Traffic on Horizon (NYT)
  • It’s Pay-To-Play on Cuomo Infrastructure Privatization Panel (NYT, WSJ)
  • Connecticut Eyes Bronx for Reverse Commute Workforce, Metro-North Expansion (News)
  • Pedestrian Countdown Signals Installed on Queens Boulevard (QCourier)
  • 63-Year-Old Suffers Head Injuries After Driver Hits Her at 14th and 7th (DNAinfo)
  • MTA Board Members Want Cuomo to Waive $75M Borrowing Fee (News)
  • Three New Traffic Lights Installed on Kent Avenue (DNAinfo)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • kevd

    Now that there are more traffic signals on Kent, can something be done to keep the obnoxious new residents of those ugly new developments from stepping into the bike path without looking? 

    Sorry, I think I was using my Gothamist commentator voice, there. 

  • kevd

    Now that there are more traffic signals on Kent, can something be done to keep the obnoxious new residents of those ugly new developments from stepping into the bike path without looking? 

    Sorry, I think I was using my Gothamist commentator voice, there. 

  • Bolwerk

    State Says No Environmental Harms in Transit-Free Tappan Zee

    If you’re going to lie, lie boldly. The environmental harm behind a transit-free, and particularly a rail-free, Tappan Zee are manifestly obvious, and range from local (land use) to global (a contribution to net global emissions, however small). Not only do we have fact-free politics, we now have fact-free bureaucracy.

  • Bolwerk, the bureaucracy has always been fact-free. It lied brazenly before EIRs were required, and since then it’s lied only somewhat less brazenly in official reports. Alternatives that it doesn’t want magically double or triple in price; alternatives that it does want have their prices strategically misrepresented in the more usual direction, so that the system can be finished with extra money because of the sunk cost.

    For example: in Boston, the state exercised considerable pressure on PB to lowball the cost estimate of the Big Dig in the 1990s. Conversely, as the project was nearing completion and it was time to focus on building extra transit for court-mandated mitigation, the cost estimates were extremely high. The North-South Rail Link was estimated at $8.7 billion, which per km is almost as high as East Side Access (local activists crunched the numbers and found that the cost would be closer to $3-4 billion, comparable to Second Avenue Subway); the easiest approach from South Station was ruled out because of a development project that was subsequently canceled, and the only option surveyed was a very deep tunnel under rather than shallow construction above the Big Dig tunnel. The Red-Blue Line link, which the mayor opposed, magically tripled in cost.

    Right now the only two of five court-mandated transit mitigation projects still under construction are infill stations on above-ground rail lines: four on a low-frequency diesel-only commuter line that’s not slated to receive a frequency boost, and one on a subway line that will come in conjunction with development with way too much parking.

    If transit activists want New York to do better than Boston, they must oppose any Tappan Zee roadway expansion until after the transit is in place, and preferably not even then, as the amount of traffic has been flat for ten years and the bridge’s maintenance cost is lower than the interest cost on its replacement.