Today’s Headlines

  • State of City on Transpo: Bikes, Traffic Enforcement, Livery Cabs, and Ed Koch Cameo (Transpo Nation)
  • Joan McDonald: Building Transit Would Delay Tappan Zee By Two Years (LoHud)
  • Public-Private Partnership Looking Unlikely for Tappan Zee (Daily Yorktown)
  • 1,400 Signatures Force Brooklyn CB to Reconsider Lafayette Ave. Bike Lane (NYT)
  • Jackson Heights, Daniel Dromm, Want to Make 78th Street Car-Free Every Sunday (News)
  • Liz Krueger Hits Cuomo for Ignoring Transit, Martin Dilan Reserves Judgment (City/State 12)
  • Six Injured as School Bus Driver Hits Car, Jumps Curb and Pins Pedestrian Against House (NY1, NYT)
  • For PPW NIMBYism, Iris Weinshall Named One of 100 Most Powerless New Yorkers (Voice)
  • Fresh Direct May Move to Bronx For Better Freight Rail Access (Crain’s)
  • Enviros: Listening to the People Means Putting Transit on Tappan Zee (CapTon)
  • Sidewalks Widened Near Manhattan Bridge Entrance, Plaza Construction to Start in 2013 (DNAinfo)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Bob

    Two additional years to build a bridge that actually makes sense? Two additional years for a bridge that will last 75 (in an era when gas prices will soar)? Waiting those extra two years seems like an entirely reasonable thing to do.

  • To be honest, I’m not sure I understand the point of a Lafayette Ave. bike lane when there’s a lane two blocks north. I think that extending it east to Carlton makes sense, to fill the gap that’s created in the Willoughby lane by Fort Greene Park. But beyond that, maybe a more innovative means of traffic calming is possible.

  • I never understand that logic, Chris.  “There’s a bike lane two blocks away, so we don’t need one here.”  Few drivers would be happy if DOT shut down a road just because there’s a perfectly good road two blocks away.  Ironic, too, since driving two blocks out of one’s way requires no extra physical effort, but cycling two blocks does.

    Plus, a bike lane is a traffic calming measure whether or not people happen to be riding on it at any given moment.  Pedestrians who desperately need cars to slow down aren’t comforted by the idea that a street two blocks north is safer.

  • Great points, Doug and Chris. First off, the Willoughby St bike lane is five blocks from Lafayette when you get further east, not two. Big difference.

    Second, Lafayette has the B38, and Willoughby does not. That makes Willoughby a better option for people who are going through the neighborhood, not necessarily for people from the neighborhood. 

    Was any thought considered to making the B38 an SBS that would have its own dedicated lane? That would reduce car travel lanes to one, just like the bike lane plan, and at the same time make the buses travel faster. You could have bulb-outs at stops, too.

  • Great points, Doug and Chris. First off, the Willoughby St bike lane is five blocks from Lafayette when you get further east, not two. Big difference.

    Second, Lafayette has the B38, and Willoughby does not. That makes Willoughby a better option for people who are going through the neighborhood, not necessarily for people from the neighborhood. 

    Was any thought considered to making the B38 an SBS that would have its own dedicated lane? That would reduce car travel lanes to one, just like the bike lane plan, and at the same time make the buses travel faster. You could have bulb-outs at stops, too.

  • Morris Zapp

    That school bus crash story is unbelievable. Run a stop sign (at high
    speed judging from the damage), hit a bus carrying school kids, which
    then jumps a curb and crushes someone’s legs, get an instant pardon from
    NYPD.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Well, it may be five blocks vs. two but the distance is the same.  It’s just that the blocks are configured differently.

    The question is does the presence of bike lanes affect where people ride?  If the answer is yes, then it makes sense to consolidate cyclists on the best routes based on “safety in numbers” until those routes are highly trafficked, and THEN add others.

    I ride Willoughby almost every day from the park to Vanderbilt, and have used it more than once to go all the way out to Queens.  It’s a fine route.  If the community wants a bike lane on Lafayette to slow traffic, I say give it to them, but people riding bicycles don’t need it at this time.

  • kevd

    Just a point of fact.  
    Willoughby to Lafayette is the same DISTANCE (except west of Ft. Greene / Washington Park).  But there are additional streets in between.  So yes, it is more blocks but the same distance.

    I love the Willoughby lane.  But I ride Lafayette when I need to.  Lafayette needs some sort of calming.