Why Julio Rides

Here’s the latest portrait in Streetsblog’s “Why I Ride” series.

image
Photo copyright Dmitry Gudkov

Julio has been working as a building superintendent for 15 years. During that time he has found that a bike is the best way to move between the 10 properties he supervises. He lives in Alphabet City and had at one point considered using his car for work, but found that gas prices and parking hassle and expense were just not worth it. He rides year round, preferring the bike over the subway even in winter: “The subway sometimes is too slow. And I have buildings all over the place.” The properties he manages are scattered from Midtown to Chinatown, so most of his trips are five miles or less. It’s an added bonus that he is not underground in case a tenant needs to call him.

Julio had a smaller, lighter bike that was recently stolen; he assumes the thieves had cut through the padlock (they made off with the chain). So he’s riding his backup cruiser bike, which he’s not thrilled with: “It’s too heavy! I usually like to bring my bike inside the building. Not so easy going up stairs with this one.” He’s now in the market for a new bike. A system of, say, public bikes stationed within easy walking distance of his buildings might also help with the lugging-up-stairs problem.

  • Jim Walden

    For most big cities, bikes are not a practical way for people to move.

  • @92dec04ffd76b64c3041ebe7c735e5f8:disqus Utterly wrong.

    The key point is that especially in big cities, no single mode of transport suffices for every use.

    For very short distances, obviously walking is the best way; for medium-short distances (especially around your own neighborhood, where you probably have the bike handy), biking works great, especially in a flat city like NYC; for longer trips, subway and other mass-transit generally works best (though biking works well too for many trips, if the weather’s nice and you have some time); if you have to move some furniture, a car is the thing.

  • That is the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard. I would say, in most big cities, biking is the most practical way for people to move. Lots of people+tiny spaces=cycling attractiveness. I think what you meant to say is: It’s not the most practical way to move if you live in an AMERICAN city where the car is prioritized over everything else.

  • Anonymous

    I think what Jim Walden meant to say is that without good bicycle infrastructure in big cities, biking is not always an appealing option.
    Thanks Dmitry for the great photos of real New Yorkers and their bikes.

  • Anonymous

    I think what Jim Walden meant to say is that without good bicycle infrastructure in big cities, biking is not always an appealing option.
    Thanks Dmitry for the great photos of real New Yorkers and their bikes.

  • moocow

    Actually I think Jim Walden is trying to say:
    “For most big cities, I’m trying to make bikes just not a practical way for people to move.”
    “By going national in my Pro Bono-ness, if I can lower the number of bike lanes, therefore riders, I can crush any improvements to cycling and road user safety. All while defending the poor, people who need jobs and those who feel they must double park on Prospect Park West”

  • Anonymous

    Is that clinton street? 

  • Eric McClure

    moocow for the win!

  • nattyb, yes, it is Clinton St

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