Today’s Headlines

  • Global CO2 Emissions Hit a New All-Time High (Dot Earth)
  • Schumer’s Response to $4/Gallon Gas: Blame Oil Refineries for Fixing Prices (NY1)
  • Denny Farrell: Assembly Hasn’t Ruled Out Gas Tax Pandering (NY1)
  • Gas Tax Holiday Mindlessness Spreads to Maryland (CS Monitor)
  • 2-Year-Old Girl in Critical Condition After SUV Driver Hits Her on Marcus Garvey Blvd (News)
  • Two People Hospitalized After Three-Car Smash-up in Midtown (DNAinfo)
  • Vacca’s Transpo Committee Has Time for Bike-Ped Inquisitions But Not Car-Free Central Park (TransNat)
  • The Longer Our Commutes, the Less Happy and Healthy We Are (Slate)
  • NY Post Having Trouble Distinguishing Between Transportation Alternatives and Transportation Nation
  • Stream of Tweets Reveals Bizarre Depths of Charles Blow’s Windshield Perspective
  • Steely

    If the driver of that SUV was going > 20mph, that 2 year old girl would be dead.  The default citywide limit should be 20mph. 

  • Anonymous

    I’m completely curious to witness the haplessness of the Post with my own eyes, but a little bit of me dies each time I give them a page view, so I’m resisting the urge.
     

  • Anonymous

    I’m completely curious to witness the haplessness of the Post with my own eyes, but a little bit of me dies each time I give them a page view, so I’m resisting the urge.
     

  • Driver

    I don’t think “taken to hospital” is the same as “hospitalized”.  There is a small but significant difference.

  • Station44025

    I was really shocked when I learned the city wide speed limit is 30–that’s waaaay too fast to drive down my street, and any other residential street, IMO. I never go that fast on the side streets because it’s insane.

  • dporpentine

    I’ve said it a million times, but whenever I go to a small towns in the US  I see speed limits that are invariably lower than in New York while the pedestrian and bike traffic is nearly nonexistent. Still, drivers obey those speed limits because they know small-town cops care about that more than just about anything. New York cops, on the other hand . . .