Today’s Headlines

  • Think the Third Term, Cathie Black Backlash Has Rubbed Off on DOT and Livable Streets? (NYT, WSJ)
  • Cuomo Institutes Parking Placard Reforms for State Officials (NYTTranspo Nation)
  • Sandi Vega Explains How Complete Streets Could Have Saved Her Daughter’s Life (MTR)
  • Peter Vallone and Christine Quinn Ax FDNY Crash Fee Proposal (WSJ)
  • Chelsea Cops Promise to Crank Up Bike Blitz as Weather Improves (Chelsea Now)
  • Grace Meng Introduces Transit Riders’ Bill of Rights In Assembly (Queens Trib)
  • Downtown Express Reports on the Overheated Politics of Pop-Up Cafés
  • Parking Space Punch Victim Regains Consciousness After Two Months (Post)
  • Four EV Charging Stations and Electric Car-Sharing Are Coming to LES Co-op (Villager)
  • Rutgers-Newark Responds to Parking Problem By Encouraging Cycling (Star-Ledger)
  • Next Up for Upstate Pedestrians: Body Armor (Buffalo News)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • M to the I

    In other news besides bike and pop up cafe bedlam, for a second time this week I witnessed an SUV crash after it being driven onto the sidewalk. Last Saturday on Flatbush Avenue at Grand Army Plaza by the library, an SUV driver lost control and drove onto the sidewalk and into the bus stop pole. And yesterday, an SUV flew onto the sidewalk and into the fruit stand next to my office on 3rd Avenue at 40th Street.

    NYPD, go get those red light runners in Central Park!

  • Ooms

    This Cuomo parking permit “reform” is a bad joke, pathetic. They change the wording from “Police Business” to “Official Business.” That’s like saying politicians can only take cash bribes in $20 bills or smaller — no more $100s. Each placard has a “unique identifier” so the public can carefully record the number and report them to their “local police.” Hilarious. Now “the public” can spend their weekend running around recording numbers from placards. Hey Cuomo, this is a joke. You want to do something? Get rid of 90% of all placards and tell state workers to go argue in traffic court like everyone else. Is the rest of what you’re doing in Albany such total BS? God save us.

  • Larry Littlefield

    As for the Bloomberg Administration, people here are going to have to accept the fact that the Mayor is going to be increasingly unpopular, as he imposes service cuts and tax increases to make up for the debts and pension deals of past years, some of which were his fault but many of which were not, and the other beneficiaries, desperate to avoid blame themselves, blame him.

    As someone in his last term, he could embrace that short term unpopularity and tell the truth, but to be credible that would have to begin with admitting his own generational equity mistakes, such as going along with the 25/55 2008 teacher pension deal.

  • Anonymous

    Thank god those SUV drivers weren’t riding bikes, or some real damage could have been done! Have you ever seen a bike hit a fruit stand and explode in a huge ball of fire? It is something you’ll never forget.

    In all seriousness, it sounds like the sidewalks were really the cause of those accidents: if there hadn’t been sidewalks, none of that would have happened. I get that some people like walking (communists, fitness freaks, poors) so as a compromise I recommend we move parking right next to the buildings, and paint lines on the road where people can walk if they choose, but that won’t impede the progress or cause crashes of innocent SUVs. Let’s put an end to this madness now!

  • Anonymous

    Thank god those SUV drivers weren’t riding bikes, or some real damage could have been done! Have you ever seen a bike hit a fruit stand and explode in a huge ball of fire? It is something you’ll never forget.

    In all seriousness, it sounds like the sidewalks were really the cause of those accidents: if there hadn’t been sidewalks, none of that would have happened. I get that some people like walking (communists, fitness freaks, poors) so as a compromise I recommend we move parking right next to the buildings, and paint lines on the road where people can walk if they choose, but that won’t impede the progress or cause crashes of innocent SUVs. Let’s put an end to this madness now!

  • Anonymous

    That Sandi Vega story is heart wrenching, but her Complete Streets bill is one of the best ideas I’ve heard in quite a while. I signed the petition.

  • Anonymous

    That Sandi Vega story is heart wrenching, but her Complete Streets bill is one of the best ideas I’ve heard in quite a while. I signed the petition.

  • Larry Littlefield

    I’d like to see more discussion of the rising number of households with cars in NYC. Is that responsible for the motor vehicle backlash? I think so.

    The number of additional vehicles is not large, but in most neighborhoods street parking is close to the maximum, and a small increase in vehicle ownership could be the tipping point between New York being a difficult place for car owners and it becomming nearly impossible. The question is, who will drivers blame?

    Consider some social history. Back when a certain generation was it its youth, when people are more likely to commit street crimes, there was an explosion of street crimes, most of which were commited by poor Blacks. And many White people, after being victimized, developed a hostile attitude toward Blacks in general.

    Later, when that same generation moved into the age when many of its members began to achieve positions of leadership in public and private institutions, there was an explosion of white collar crime, which is ongoing.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Ah, hit return. Anyway, most of the white collar crimes were committed by White people, but you didn’t hear of White people being hostile to other White people in general as a result.

    Similarly, you don’t hear of car owners blaming other car owners for the increasing parking difficulty. Because they are drivers themselves.

    So perhaps in their frustration, they are turning (or are being turned) on bicycles and pedestrians.

    And there is nothing that can be done about their frustration, because more cars just makes it worse.

  • carma

    Larry, as a car driver. I AM going to blame other drivers. as a driver, i see the too many stupid inattentiveness actions that many drivers do perform. i think to myself, how the hell do these guys get their license? b/c our licensing system is too relaxed. we never test for “emergency” handling of a vehicle. (we need driving tests performed on a slalom course.) we never test for highway driving. (although this may be unrealistic).
    but most importantly. we need to MAKE IT SO DRIVERS STOP TEXTING and pay attention to the road.
    driving is an exclusive privellage. NOT a right.
    this driver is also fed up with bad drivers.

  • The Cathy Black comparison is a poor one. By saying that you imply that Janette Sadik-Khan is from the corporate world and has no knowledge of the department she is in charge of. Bad headline on your part.

  • I read both the NYT and WSJ articles and saw no parallels to DOT or Livable Streets. Someone’s trying to boost their page views! That only works so many times Ben

  • Larry Littlefield

    http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2011/04/past_and_presen_3.php#more

    Pictures of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1903 and today. Look at all the space shifted to automobiles, and it still isn’t enough. It never is.

  • J:Lai

    I think Bloomie’s handling of the Cathy Black issue is terrible.
    Commissioners in all departments now have to consider the possibility that the mayor might not back them if they take unpopular actions. These are mostly people who are not independently wealthy, and who do wish to continue careers in government after Bloomberg’s last term is over.
    It encourages the commissioners to hunker down and avoid anything that would draw attention to themselves for the remainder of the term.

  • No mention of the reality show “Triple Rush” and the disservice it does to NYC commuting by bicycle. Can’t wait for what the NY Post will say.

  • Larry Littlefield

    That has always been the pattern in NYC government and Bloomberg broke it, encouraging his managers to try to make things better despite the possibility of failure/mistakes. And he has been very loyal.

    In this case he had no choice. She was a very unpopular, new appointee moving into a crisis. So they were able to demonize her as incompetent, rightly or wrongly, rather than focusing on policy, since she really hadn’t done anything.

    I criticize Bloomberg for many things, but not that. I wrote a post about his management during the last election season, and pointed to that as a strength.

    http://www.r8ny.com/blog/larry_littlefield/the_bloomberg_administration_a_review_part_i.html

  • Driver

    Sorry guys, but your comparison of white collar crimes to street crimes ignore the fact that white collar crimes don’t utilize weapons, possible indiscriminate violence, and the vulnerability that comes with the threat of imminent danger or death. I’m sure if many of us had the choice between losing $100 to someone with a gun in our face on a dark street, or losing a few thousand on paper as a result of white collar crime, we would prefer the less traumatic yet significantly more costly white collar crime. Apples and oranges.

    Carma, I totally agree that the road testing for licensing is waaay too lax. When I took my road test for a CDL (truck license) there was a small portion of highway driving involved. That should be standard for all road tests. Incidentally, when I took my CDL road test, I was driving very cautiously and relatively slowly, more by the book, rather than typical real life driving. My test administrator said I was driving too slowly and that he needed to see that I could handle the truck under typical driving conditions, which I had no problem doing. I think general road testing could benefit from this type of evaluation, rather than the typical slow caution side street driving and three point turn that just about anyone can eek out (sometimes after multiple tries) to get their license.