LA Kids Tell City Hall How to Improve Biking — Via YouTube

Today on the Streetsblog Network, a story about some kids in Los Angeles who did their research and came up with several good ideas about improving conditions for bicycle commuters. Then they ran up against the reality that the public forums on the city’s bike plan weren’t so public. But they didn’t let that stop them.

Stephen Box at SoapBox LA reports:

Picture_1.pngThese kids from the West Side of LA were determined to let the city know what they think about bike commuting.

The FIRSTteamWestside (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and
Technology) is a group of kids who prepared a presentation that they
intended to give at the Bike Plan (draft) workshops.

mission was to develop a plan to improve local transportation. They did
the research and they prepared and they discovered that the public
workshops were not the robust public arena they desired, so they adapted.

coach reports, "The kids were hoping to give a presentation at one of
the "public forums" but were badly disappointed when they found out
that members of the public would not be allowed to speak so they posted
it on YouTube and submitted the link at"

The kids give an amazingly articulate and informed statement, recommending additional bike cars for the region’s commuter rail system. The future is coming.

More from the network: The Transport Politic looks at the importance of aligning transitways with walkable neighborhoods. On Transport discusses the concept of "lifestyle centers" and their aspirations to create a sense of community in a suburban mall setting. And Intersection 911 reports on the 38 percent bump in Philadelphia bike commuting during the SEPTA strike.


Crain’s: Finalists Chosen for NYC Bike-Share

Crain’s reports that the city has narrowed down the proposals to two, maybe three, finalists to operate a bike-share system which could add about 10,000 public bikes at 600 stations to NYC’s transportation mix: Sources confirm two finalists: Alta Bicycle Share, based in Portland, Ore., and B-Cycle, owned by Wisconsin bicycle maker Trek, health insurer […]