IBM Pitches Congestion Pricing to Middle America

This IBM ad, now airing during NFL playoff games, is definitely aimed at the motoring set. More remarkable than its windshield perspective, though, is that it’s being used to introduce the concept of congestion pricing to sports-obsessed Americans, and it doesn’t get more mainstream than that.

Instead of encouraging people to get out of their cars — ’cause that would be nuts — the spot touts IBM’s "smart" tolling technology, now employed in Stockholm (and proposed for New York in 2007). The ad is basically saying, "Don’t you hate waiting in traffic? Sure. We all do. It wastes your time and your gas. And it’s stupid. Here’s something we can do about it."

Yeah, it’s just a commercial, and talking is a far cry from doing. But the mere fact that this message is out there between kickoffs is worth noting.

Oh, and go Steelers.

Video: IBMAdvertising/YouTube

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