Upright Citizens: Bikes and Walking Next Best Thing to Teleportation

From a Q&A with comedian Amy Poehler and her improv-mates in the Upright Citizens Brigade, spotted in the current issue of Time Out New York:

What’s the future of New York? What are your hopes, and what needs to happen?

ucb.jpgMatt Besser: I want them to get rid of that law that inhibits Critical Mass. It’s a great human event — especially in a city filled with buildings and concrete.
Amy Poehler: I wish we had those shared-bike programs.
Ian Roberts: Yeah. I’d get all those bikes. And I’d take them to my apartment.
Amy Poehler: I want to be able to teleport to other neighborhoods. I’ve been waiting for that to happen for a while.

And, when asked what the L.A. transplants miss about New York:

Matt Walsh: Walking around everywhere, the food…
Ian Roberts: In L.A., you go straight from your air-conditioned house to your air-conditioned car to your air-conditioned office. Walking around in New York, it’s refreshing to know that you’re part of humanity.

Next press stop for these guys? How about Streetsblog LA.

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