Will Congestion Pricing Make or Break Mayoral Campaigns?

While we wait to see what happens, or doesn’t happen, today in Albany, New York Magazine takes a look at four mayoral aspirants and how their positions on congestion pricing may affect their chances of succeeding Michael Bloomberg.

  • City Council Member Tony Avella: "[Avella is] an obscure pol, and attacking CP allowed him to grab attention while
    promoting his anti-tax agenda. But he may have gone around the bend,
    ranting about routine horse-trading for council members’ votes."
  • Comptroller Bill Thompson: "The city comptroller has been mildly supportive of congestion pricing, though he’s always been careful to attach caveats … Why take a bold stance on something that might never happen?"
  • City Council Speaker Christine Quinn: "[S]he used last week’s vote to demonstrate leadership on a contentious issue … Plus, wrapping her arms so tightly around CP also earned Quinn a big chit with Bloomberg…"
  • Congressman Anthony Weiner: "[I]n the campaign, he’ll cast congestion pricing as Manhattan-centric and
    elitist, like Quinn. Weiner was thrilled to see her so far out front."

And don’t forget Marty Markowitz, whose most notable contribution to the congestion pricing discussion has probably been his vehement opposition to new bridge tolls. 

On a related note, the Daily Politics reports that Deputy Mayor Kevin Sheekey issued a not-so-subtle warning on the radio this morning that state pols will be judged on where they come down, and could be supported or opposed accordingly in future races.

Whether or not the plan passes in Albany, how will congestion pricing influence your vote for the next mayor?

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