What Glick’s District Will Lose Without Congestion Pricing

glick_1.jpgWith the fate of congestion pricing likely to be decided over the weekend, we’re going to beat this drum some more this afternoon.

Yesterday we heard that Assembly Member Deborah Glick’s office told a constituent the congestion pricing bill could lead to worsening air quality. (Because, you know, building mass transit infrastructure will cancel out all the particulate pollution that pricing will keep out of the air.)

If Glick ends up basing her decision on that tortured logic, here’s a look at what she would deny her district [PDF], according to the Campaign for New York’s Future:

  • 46 new subway cars, primarily for the E and F lines
  • 3 additional buses for the M20/M104 Routes
  • 5 additional buses for the M101/102/103 Routes
  • 6 additional buses for the M15 Route
  • 9 additional buses for the M1/M2/M3/M4 Routes

Those are just the short-term enhancements that will be implemented before congestion pricing goes into effect. (And it’s worth repeating that the data comes from CFNY’s district fact sheets, an excellent tool to help bolster your argument when you call your reps.)

Glick’s district, which falls entirely within the congestion zone, also stands to benefit enormously from the most obvious result of congestion pricing: less traffic. Lower Manhattan will see a 33.2 percent reduction in extreme traffic jams and a 6.4 percent reduction in overall traffic, according to DOT commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan.

And it goes without saying that a very small minority of Glick’s constituents would actually pay the fee. Only 3.2 percent drive alone outside the zone as part of their commute, according to 2000 Census data.

Brodskyite populist posturing would seem especially out of place in these parts. Only 22.4 percent of households own a car, a low figure even in New York City, and the average income of those households is more than $180,000.

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