“En-Suite” Parking, for the Discerning Antisocial Urbanite

 
Love the glamor and glitz of the city but looking to avoid unpleasant public spaces, like sidewalks and building lobbies? Then 200 Eleventh Avenue in Chelsea may be for you.

Featuring "New York’s first En-Suite Sky Garage," which will allow residents to enter and exit their apartments without coming into contact with another human soul, this 19-story high rise brings the isolationist paranoia of the suburbs straight to the heart of super-chic Manhattan. As demonstrated in the video, owners will be whisked via car elevator from ground level to their McMansions in the sky. Units start in the low millions, and include 300 square feet of automobile living space.

As for those stories of shady union-busting labor practices employed to build the tower, well, that’s for the little people to fuss over — like the members of Community Board 4, who rejected the car elevator before it was ultimately approved by city planners.

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