DOT Seeks Assistant Commissioner for Congestion Pricing

Here’s a job listing you’re not going to find on Craigslist Westchester or in the Queens Tribune: The New York City Department of Transportation’s new Office of Planning and Sustainability is (or was) looking for an Assistant Commissioner for Congestion Pricing. 

Salary: $130,000 to $150,000. No word on whether you get a government-issued parking placard but I’m guessing not.

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Push for Congestion Pricing Spurs Parking Reform

|
  It may not have been Mayor Bloomberg’s intention when he proposed congestion pricing, but he has put reforming curbside parking policies front and center. Desperate for "alternatives" to pricing, opponents have borrowed proposals to hike curbside parking rates, and price free curb spaces. These parking reforms which would significantly reduce double-parking and traffic snarling […]

Details of the Mayor’s Residential Parking Permit Proposal

|
Potential residential parking permit stickers, curbside regulations, and David Yassky. Here are some more details about the residential parking permit program proposed today by Mayor Bloomberg and DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan: A residential parking permit (RPP) plan will be included in the congestion pricing legislation that will be introduced in the City Council and State […]

112,000 Less Cars

|
Here are more points from Friday’s PlaNYC Hearing:  Deputy Mayor Dan Doctoroff estimated congestion pricing would remove 112,000 cars from city streets on a daily basis, with 94,000 would-be drivers switching to transit, in what he said would be "Probably the single greatest mode shift anywhere." DOT Deputy Commissioner Bruce Schaller said that whatever edge […]

What Glick’s District Will Lose Without Congestion Pricing

|
With the fate of congestion pricing likely to be decided over the weekend, we’re going to beat this drum some more this afternoon. Yesterday we heard that Assembly Member Deborah Glick’s office told a constituent the congestion pricing bill could lead to worsening air quality. (Because, you know, building mass transit infrastructure will cancel out […]