Berlin’s Bicycle Boom

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Committed to making cycling a viable form of transportation, the Berlin Senate measures the success of that city’s bicycle network by the prevalence of cyclists in the overall traffic mix — rather than the way New York’s DOT does, by the miles of bike lanes built. Via TreeHugger:

Two years ago, the Berlin Senate decided that bikes should make up 15% of city traffic by the year 2010. Results released from the newest traffic study of the Berlin Development Administration show that the goal could be reached early: the number of bicyclists has more than doubled in the last decade to 400,000 riders daily, accounting for 12% of total traffic.

A clever investment strategy in biking infrastructure is likely the primary facilitator of the migration to human powered vehicles. The program targeted improvement of connections between train stations and bike paths, and over 3000 bicycle parking places have been built on 40 stations. The current situation in Berlin is the envy of many a city: Berliners have access to 620 Km of bike paths, 80 Km of bike lanes in the streets, 70 Km of bus lanes which are also open to bicyclists, 100 Km of combined pedestrian/bike paths and 50 Km of marked bike lanes on the sidewalks. The Berlin Senate Bicycle Traffic Strategy foresees pulling all these routes together into a network with primary routes running from the city center out to the suburbs and two traffic rings by 2016. Park-and-ride facilities will be added at 20 additional U-bahn stations in the coming year.

Photo: tilde~/Flickr

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