The Benefits of a “Road Diet.”

As the Department of Transportation’s "Road Diet" plan for Brooklyn’s 9th Street stirs up the ire of a small but well-organized and politically-connected group of home and car owners, it’s worth taking a look at this Parsons Brinckerhoff presentation, "Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities." PB’s case studies show that, after properly executed Road Diets, car crashes and speeding are drastically reduced, pedestrians "feel" that streets have become safer and more pleasant, and very little excess traffic is diverted to neighboring streets. Someone want to forward this to State Senator Eric Adams

Thanks to Streetsblog reader Greg Raisman from Portland for forwarding this along.

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