Today’s Headlines

  • Charter Bus Driver Kills Man on UES; NYPD Blames Victim (Post, DNAAP, NY1)
  • Cuomo and TWU Strong-Arm NYC for MTA Funds (News, DNANY1); Mayor: No (Politico)
  • MTA Board Members, Riders Slam Fare Hikes, Crap Service (NYT, Politico, GothamistNY1, WNYC)
  • Upper Manhattan Organizes to Protest Deteriorating Conditions on the A (DNA)
  • Media Transfixed by Seatless Car Component of MTA Rescue Plan (NYT 1, 2; NY1Post)
  • Summertime Ferry Service: Part Transit, Part Party Boat (NYT)
  • Cuomo Speaks Out on Trump’s Gateway Dithering (Post)
  • Cuomo Takes an Interest in the “Textalyzer” (NewsPost)
  • PD: Action Carting Driver Killed Neftaly Ramirez (DNA); Pols Plead With Hit-and-Run Killers (DNA)
  • Why Was This Unlicensed Driver Behind the Wheel of a TLC Vehicle? (News)
  • The Times Gives a Hit-and-Run the “Only in New York” Treatment

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Larry Littlefield

    MTA Board members slam fare hikes and crap service? Really?

    All the perps are out there in the press suddenly, blaming someone else.

  • The Times’ fixation on seatless subway cars is so damn predictable. As soon as Lhota announced this, I knew they’d publish these very stories. As with bike share, it’s another example of people explaining how a thing that works in transit systems around the world will never work here. We’re probably one MTA hearing or news segment away from someone saying “This isn’t Hong Kong!” For people who fancy themselves as cosmopolitan, some New Yorkers are depressingly provincial.

  • Larry Littlefield

    You only get so many Times articles for free so I won’t read it, but did anyone bring up this?

    CBTC was supposed to get us 40 trains per hour, and since there is no need for a train operator anymore, just one NYCT employee per train. Which means twice as many trains with the same number of workers, or perhaps a limited number of additional subway car maintenance workers for the additional cars. So we spent $500 million. That should get rid of crowding, right?

    But although line capacity is 40 TPH, you still have terminal capacity issues at 8th Avenue because there are no tail tracks. They just decided not to add tail tracks while the 14th Street tunnel is shut down.

    And at Rockaway Parkway because the Canarsie Line rebuild didn’t leave a center track that could serve as an interim terminal at Broadway Junction.

    And arbitrators have ruled that the TWU can dictate staffing levels on the trains.
    So instead, they are removing seats from the trains?

  • AMH

    You can open the story in incognito mode.

  • AMH

    That story about the GWB hit-and-run is a gem. “A car in the lane to my left had lost control and had hit my right front fender.”

  • qrt145

    Darn self-driving cars!

  • JudenChino

    What pisses me off about this TWU shit, is that, there is enough work to go around, just repurpose people for useful shit and not redundancies.

    Like what does Alon Levy always point, that the TBM’s in Spain have just like 6 operators while we use 15 or something? Can’t blame that shit on the unique difficulties of NYC’s terrain. Put those 9 people on one of the other pressing MTA needs.

  • Eric McClure

    You mean the same Action Carting that trumpets its commitment to safety on every Mets and Yankees radio broadcast? From their website:

    A Total Commitment to Employee and Customer Safety

    We are one of the few environmental services and waste management companies to have a full-time safety director on staff, demonstrating our commitment to employee and customer safety.

    We reduce and eliminate incidents and potential issues through extensive, ongoing training and education for our employees

    Every member of our team understands that a dedication to safety is part of their personal mission and a pillar of our corporate best practices

    We hold monthly safety meetings to review and update rules and practices and instill our safety commitment to every Action employee

    Our company-wide Action “Yellow Campaign” demonstrates our safety focus – you’ll see the decal on each of our trucks

  • Fool

    TWU’s primary interest is more cumulative working hours for their member roles, not increased efficiency. So rather than run twice as many trains with the same amount of employees, they would rather run the current amount of trains while arguing for additional union members to increase capacity.

    TWU does not represent the sandhogs though, the white men who operate the TBMs.

    For capital construction, NYS is incredibly union friendly in its contracts, to where if you are not using union labor you are then operating under “prevailing” wage which is always based off of union negotiated labor rates.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Actually, the TWU and Sandhogs are racially integrated unions.

    The issue with union labor and contracts is not with the Sandhogs, but rather it is with the unions that work on public and private projects. Or they used to work on private projects.

    Now the public projects in general and the MTA in particular are covering the entire hole in the multi-employer pension funds — from pension increases and underfunding in the 1990s. Including that related to past private construction.

    it’s under Omerta.

  • Fool

    I never wrote the TWU wasn’t integrated, the Sandhogs are not.

    Infact pretty much all construction industry unions are institutionally racist in NYC.

  • Vooch

    Larry,

    they might be integrated in name, but in practice they work segregated

  • Andrew

    CBTC was supposed to get us 40 trains per hour,

    Source that CBTC on the Canarsie line was supposed to result in a practical capacity of 40 tph?

    and since there is no need for a train operator anymore, just one NYCT employee per train.

    NYCT’s implementation of CBTC requires a train operator.

    (It doesn’t require a conductor, but that’s simply a function of transverse cabs, not of the signal system. The TWU, of course, continues to object, for obvious reasons.)

    Which means twice as many trains with the same number of workers, or perhaps a limited number of additional subway car maintenance workers for the additional cars.

    Twice as many trains running means twice as many cars to be purchased, twice as many cars to be stored, twice as many cars to be maintained (not merely “perhaps a limited number of subway car maintenance workers”). Those costs are not insignificant.

    So we spent $500 million.

    I’m not sure what this is referring to. The cost of the new signal system?

    The Canarsie line was picked as the pilot CBTC line for three reasons: (1) its signal system was overdue for replacement; (2) it’s a standalone line, minimizing the complexity of the pilot CBTC implementation; (3) ridership at the time was relatively low, so a major failure of the pilot system would have had a relatively small impact.

    It was not picked in order to increase train frequencies on the line to 40 tph; even today’s ridership (much higher than in the 1990’s!) doesn’t warrant anywhere near 40 tph.

    Had the pilot project not been undertaken on the Canarsie line, its original 1920’s signals would still have needed replacement, and the pilot line would have been the more complex, and higher-ridership, Flushing line.

    But although line capacity is 40 TPH, you still have terminal capacity issues at 8th Avenue because there are no tail tracks. They just decided not to add tail tracks while the 14th Street tunnel is shut down.

    Adding tail tracks would do nothing without also addressing the power constraint. The power system currently limits service to 20 tph. New substations will increase that to 22 tph. But the signal system, including the 8th Avenue terminal, can support up to 26 tph. So there’s no point in even considering adding tail tracks until a plan is in place to add enough substations to support more than 26 tph.

    Trains move pretty fast into the terminal with CBTC. Tail tracks would increase signal capacity, but by how much? Have any of the advocates for tail tracks attempted to quantify the benefit of their proposal? It’s probably pretty small.

    And at Rockaway Parkway because the Canarsie Line rebuild didn’t leave a center track that could serve as an interim terminal at Broadw ay Junction.

    There’s a middle track south of Myrtle which is used to terminate selected rush hour trains from Manhattan.