In Streetopia, Traffic Won’t Scare People Away From Biking

This short video from Clarence Eckerson shows how far the city has come - and how much is left to do - to make NYC streets safe enough so everyone who wants to ride a bike will feel comfortable riding a bike.

streetopia biking

From 2010 to 2015, bike commuting increased 80 percent in New York City — a testament to the efforts of mayors Michael Bloomberg and Bill de Blasio and their transportation commissioners to build more and better better infrastructure.

But most New Yorkers still don’t get around on a bike, and cycling accounts for a small share of total trips — one or two percent, less than in London, let alone Tokyo and Berlin or, if you want to aim higher, Amsterdam and Copenhagen. For most people, biking on NYC streets remains too intimidating.

As much as the NYC bike network has improved in recent years, most people still see biking on city streets as too risky. In much of the city, major streets lack protected bike lanes. And even where protected bike lanes are most prevalent, there are too many gaps in the network and intersections are often too stressful.

New York can do better.

As part of the recently-launched Streetopia campaign, Clarence Eckerson put together this short video rundown of how our existing bike network falls short — and what needs to happen to make it work for more people. Take a look:

  • Gino

    We need more jersey barriers on Vernon blvd, its constantly blocked by trucks, rigs, taxis and conEd vans

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

On a Manhattan avenue where transit and high-occupancy vehicles take precedence and the curb is reserved for deliveries, large amounts of street space can be claimed for walking and biking. Image: Street Plans Collaborative

Envisioning NYC’s Next Streets Revolution

|
New York can be a city where everyone from young kids to elderly seniors can get around without fear, where neighborhood streets can be places of congregation and activity instead of motorways. To become that city, we'll have to shift a lot more street space from cars to transit, biking, and walking.

The Third Most Influential Streetfilm of All Time

|
With the 10-year benefit for Streetsblog and Streetfilms coming up on November 14 (get your tickets here!), we are counting down the 12 most influential Streetfilms of all time, as determined by Clarence Eckerson Jr. The Case for Physically Separated Bike Lanes Number of plays: 123,500 Publish date: February 17, 2007 Why is it here? Ten […]

The 2015 NYC Streetsies, Part 1

|
Welcome to the first installment of the 2015 NYC Streetsies. The votes are in, and today we’re looking back at how streets changed for walking, biking, and transit this year. Tomorrow will be all about the people who left a mark on the city’s streets. The Best Thing That Happened This Year Bike-share debuted two years ago […]
The signs say Manhattan, but don't be fooled, the island of Manhattan has no streets like this.

NYC Needs a Network of Car-Free Streets

|
New York City in 2017 has several car-free blocks and pedestrianized street segments where traffic once rules, like Plaza 33 and Myrtle-Wyckoff Plaza. But unlike several other world cities, New York still doesn't have a connected grid of car-free streets.