Today’s Headlines

  • Someone Had to Die Before Chris Christie Raised the NJ Gas Tax (NYT, WNYC)
  • Feds Were Investigating NJ Transit Safety Problems Before Hoboken Crash (NYT)
  • Engineer Says He Doesn’t Remember Moment of Impact (AMNY); Black Box Wasn’t Working (Post)
  • Study: Spending on NYC Bike Lanes Is a Huge Public Health Bargain (Reuters)
  • MTA Has to Run a Ton of Tests in 3 Months to Launch 2nd Ave Subway in 2016 (AMNY)
  • What Can NYC Learn From Barcelona’s Car-Free Blocks? (NYT)
  • Pair of 3 Train Stations in Eastern Brooklyn to Close for Repairs for 5 Months (DNA)
  • Floodproofing Rules Might Stymie Plan for Water Street Retail (Crain’s, News)
  • Video: NYPD Squad Car Driver T-Bones SUV in West Brighton, Injuring 3 (Advance)
  • What a Raving Lunatic in Bayside Thinks About Bioswales (TL)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Larry Littlefield

    The NJ gas tax is like the NYC subway fare used to be. Grandstanding politicians “fight for the people” by keeping it low, with a consequence of a deteriorated infrastructure and, in the end, higher prices than they would have been anyway. In the end, the only winners are those who move away or die off before the consequences arrive.

    There seems to be no shortage of selfish, shortsighted people. And taking advantage of them is a strategy that any idiot seems capable of implementing.

    Until there is some sort of social share associated with robbing the collective future, or at least some personal consequences for not providing for one’s own personal future, expect ongoing social decay to continue. When Christie showed up in Hoboken he should have been shouted down and prevented from making a statement.

  • Larry Littlefield

    “New York built 45.5 miles of bike lanes in 2015, with an investment of about $8 million.”

    Assuming NYC’s share of the estimated $6.1 billion in U.S. bicycle, parts, accessories and services sales is in proportion to its population, the state and local sales tax revenues on those sales would have been about $12.5 million.

  • Kevin Love

    The “personal consequences” are supposed to be delivered via elections. But if the people keep rewarding the bad behavior by re-electing those politicians… Just goes to show that democracy is a lousy form of government.

    Winston Churchill said it best:

    “It has been said that democracy is the worst form of government except all the others that have been tried.”

    http://www.ignitedquotes.com/it-has-been-said-that-democracy-is-the-worst-form-of-government/

  • Larry Littlefield

    People aren’t exactly well informed of the consequences of these decisions, in part because they don’t want to be.

    Certainly the beneficiaries don’t like being reminded of the current consequences of past decisions. Rationalizations are part of the deal they have come to expect.

  • AMH

    That letter raving against ‘mini-swamps’ is kind of hilarious. An editor should really be more reluctant to publish ignorant rants, though.

  • Flakker

    Right on. Look at Flint right now: Democrats demand that federal money be spent to fix the vandalism of the state, Republicans insist that no money be spent by anyone. Clinton did mention in one of the primary debates that there has to be a way to make the state pay for it but that idea has apparently been forgotten as political realities kick in.

  • AnoNYC

    Interactive bike messenger stories:

    Thrill Ride
    Meet the intrepid cyclists powering New York City’s food-delivery obsession

    http://www.eater.com/a/bike-messenger-fitness

  • AnoNYC

    The writer of that piece is just ignorant and provincial.

  • AnoNYC

    I like what’s being done in Barcelona. Raise the bar.

  • qrt145

    That is a very interesting story, but it doesn’t seem representative of most of the food delivery workers I see…