Today’s Headlines

  • Hit-and-Run Dollar Van Driver Kills Angel Sagardia, 47, and Injures His Wife on Flatbush Av (News, PIX)
  • No Charges for SUV Driver After Crash Kills 50-Year-Old Man on Springfield Blvd (News, Gothamist)
  • Cop Says She Voided Cell Phone Ticket for Vanessa Gibson After Pol Pressured NYPD Brass (News)
  • New Yorkers Sing Praises of Bus Lanes, Faster Buses in Times Story on Subway-Free Transit Deserts
  • DOT Will Begin Installing Chrystie Street Protected Bike Lane by End of the Month (Bowery Boogie)
  • Hell’s Kitchen Electeds Slam Port Plan for New Bus Terminal; PA: There’s No Alternative (DNA, WCBS)
  • Jamaica Man Pleads Guilty to Hit-Run, Will Serve Six Months After Killing Pedestrian in February (TL)
  • Hit-and-Run Motorcyclist Injures 50-Year-Old Stapleton Man (Advance)
  • 26-Year-Old Motorcyclist Dies After Striking Car on Q’Boro Bridge Ramp Early Sunday Morning (News)

More headlines at Streetsblog USA

  • Kevin Love

    Who is surprised at City Councilwoman Vanessa Gibson’s little NYPD corrupt perk? One law (or lack thereof) for them and a different law for us serfs.

  • stairbob

    Yay, Chrystie Street!

  • AMH
  • Vooch

    6 mths hard Time for homicide ?

  • AMH

    Good to know a member of the Public Safety Committee is so safety-conscious while driving.

  • Kevin Love

    Who needs to be safety-conscious when they can be “corruption -conscious” and know exactly who to call in NYPD to get their ticket corruptly quashed.

  • BrandonWC

    DOT’s concrete scheduled for the week shows work on 6th Ave protected bike lane pedestrian islands starting Thursday http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/downloads/pdf/concretesch.pdf

  • AnoNYC

    Great link.

  • AnoNYC

    I’m glad that Chrystie Street is getting worked on finally, but what the heck happened with the improvements on 1st Ave between E 124th and 125th Sts+the new protected lane running along E 124th St from 1st to 2nd Aves?

    Was there any projected timetable for this project?

  • AMH

    Or “squashed”, as the News put it.

  • BrandonWC

    There is concrete working being done this week on ped ramp upgrades on 124th St between 1st and 2nd Ave. It would be some coincidence if that wasn’t related to the bike project. That’s pretty far out of my way or I’d go check it out in person. http://www.nyc.gov/html/dot/downloads/pdf/concretesch.pdf

  • AMH

    “In the morning, Mr. Pierre usually takes a dollar van, which actually costs $2, to the E train at Jamaica Center and transfers to the B or D line to get to his information technology job near Columbus Circle. At night, he sometimes splurges on a $10 Long Island Rail Road trip that drops him near his home.”

    We desperately need fairer pricing for the railroads. No one should have to pay $10 within the city. We should be using them to take pressure off the subway too.

  • AnoNYC

    I’ll probably swing by later and see what up. Been waiting for this one forever because I depend on it to get me home. I really hope that it’s installed before September.

    I’ll check out the progress on the 2nd Ave PBL in E Harlem and post it here too. Last time I passed I noticed islands down to about E 100th or 101st.

  • BrandonWC

    Take pictures and report back!
    I’m pretty sure 124th St was on last week’s concrete schedule too (as far as I know they aren’t archived so I couldn’t say for sure) and today is the final day on this week’s schedule so you’d think the work would be done tonight (concrete work at least, though usually paint goes in first). Street view from May shows islands on 2nd as far south as 99th St.

  • Kevin Love

    Not just a typo but a Freudian slip? Squashed is definitely what those cell phone distracted drivers do to cyclists and pedestrians.

  • kevd

    But then there will be dirty city people standing on commuter trains –
    Ew!

  • Kevin Love

    How much extra capacity is on those LIRR trains? Is it possible to run more trains? In other words, is there enough extra capacity to provide meaningful subway relief?

  • bolwerk

    At rush hour? Maybe none.

    The rest of the day? A shit-ton.

  • sbauman

    What there isn’t at rush hour is extra capacity west of Jamaica. There’s plenty of capacity running shuttles to Jamaica. They can turn at the abandoned Richmond Hill station on the abandoned Lower Montauk Branch..

    Running shuttle trains between the Nassau County-NYC line and Richmond Hill could provide a relatively inexpensive solution for Southeast Queens. The solution would be made inexpensive by eliminating many of the nearly 9000 weekday buses that stop in Jamaica.

    It keep the dirty city people off the through commuter trains.

  • Komanoff

    I too want lower intra-city commuter rail fares, and the Move NY plan does include expanding the MTA’s City Ticket program that has been a decent first step in that direction.

    But I think the quoted $10 fare for a night-time LIRR trip from Penn to Rosedale (in Emma Fitzsimmon’s NYT article which AMH is riffing on) is an exaggeration.

    The 2013 LIRR off-peak fare for “Zone 3,” which is probably Mr. Pierre’s commute, was $7.00 for a one-off but, less, $6.18, if bought in packs of 10, which Mr. Pierre, a “sometimes” user, would be advised to do.

    That doesn’t include the 2015 MTA fare hike, but it probably wasn’t more than 8 percent, probably less. Even at 8 percent, the $6.18 would have gone up only 50 cents so the current 10-pack rate ought to be around $6.68. That would be a third less than the reported ten bucks.

    Can a transit expert reading this check this out? Thanks.

  • AnoNYC

    Took a ton of photos, will email to Streetsblog.

    Two-way lane is indeed up from E 124th to E 125th. Jersey barrier on 1st Ave has not been installed yet though, just a paint buffer. Nor has there been any reconfiguration for 1st just south of E 124th St yet (was supposed to move the bike lane to the curbside and separate). They corrected the connection at the west end of the new E 124th St lane too. Instead of going around the plaza via sidewalk, the lane extends all the way to 2nd.

    Also, the 2nd Ave parking protected bike lane is accessible just past E 99th St now.

  • ItsEasyBeingGreen

    On some trains quite a bit. Even during rush hour it’s not abnormal for a train to have every passenger seated. A lot of people could and would stand between the city stations and Penn considering its shorter than most subway rides.

  • ahwr

    LIRR peak fares are for westbound trains schedule to arrive at western terminals 6-10am, and eastbound trains scheduled to leave western terminals at 4-8pm. If the guy leaves for work in the morning, I’m not sure nighttime means after 8pm. First train after 8pm is the 8:42, with a change at Jamaica. Peak fare for the trip is $10, no discount for a ten pack.

    Off peak the trip is 7.25, or 61.75 for ten.

    http://web.mta.info/lirr/about/TicketInfo/LIRRFares03-22-15.pdf

    http://web.mta.info/lirr/Timetable/Station2/FarRockawayFR1.pdf

  • ahwr

    The solution would be made inexpensive by eliminating many of the nearly 9000 weekday buses that stop in Jamaica.

    What counts as many, and which buses did you have in mind? To take a quick example, the Q111,Q113,Q114 stop at Guy R Brewer and 137th. It’s a bit more than a half mile walk to get to Locust Manner. From there the bus runs close to three miles to get to the subway. It makes a lot of stops along the way. The LIRR train wouldn’t stop until Jamaica. There’s a long gap from Jamaica to St. Albans too.

    Is that stretch electrified? What’s the cost to electrify, add signals, and rehab Richmond Hill to meet ADA regulations? And does NY&A use any of the tracks you want to run the shuttle on?

    How would the rail shuttle compare to improving buses on Guy R Brewer and Merrick?

  • Komanoff

    Gotcha. Looks like I took “night” too literally, thinking the guy was on the late shift. Thanks for correction.

  • Guest
  • Kevin Love

    You are right! She has disgraced these pages before. Endangering children and other cyclists with placard fraud blocking a bike lane.

    Wow! The fraud, corruption, contempt for human life, child endangerment… Just the person we want on the Public Safety Committee.

  • AMH

    According to tripplanner.mta.info, the peak fare is $10 and off-peak is $7.25

  • AMH

    All good questions. I doubt there is much spare peak capacity, but there may be during off-peak and shoulder periods. Is the LIRR even trying to increase capacity? Add double-deckers? Will ESA increase capacity?

  • sbauman

    Let me congratulate you on finding an example that’s borderline regarding total decreased travel time vs. rail transit.

    So far as I can tell from the existing bus service schedules, the average travel time to Jamaica Center is 18 minutes and the average headway is 4.75 minutes. That should be pretty good in anyone’s book, if the service were reliable and did not pollute the environment.

    The LIRR shuttle I propose, would have 5 minute headways. The LIRR provides 20 minute peak and 60 minute non-peak headways for the Locust Manor station. The proposed shuttle would resemble subway service rather than commuter rail.

    Running time between Locust Manor and Jamaica averages around 6 minutes. There is no difference in waiting time between the existing bus service and the shuttle I’ve described. It’s approximately 0.6 miles walking distance from your chosen intersection to the Locust Manor station. That should take 12 minutes. The total travel time, excluding waiting time, should be 18 minutes. That’s matches the existing bus travel time from your chosen intersection.

    The trains would operate on the same track as the existing LIRR commuter service. What’s required is a turnout before the branches merge. That’s where using the Richmond Hill station comes in. The station does not have to be open for passengers to accomplish this purpose. The tracks were once electrified because Richmond Hill was also served by trains from Penn Station via Whitepot and Glendale Junctions. The NY&A operates very few trains.

    A better solution may be available, if the ESA is ever completed. The LIRR’s plan is to sever through trains to Brooklyn. They are planning to build a new platform at the Jamaica station that is separate from the rest of the terminal. The shuttles I envision could use the severed Atlantic Branch, instead of LIRR Scoots.

    The gap north of the St. Albans station is an illusion. The the distance between St. Albans and the 179th St station is less than 2 miles. Buses designed to serve the area north of St. Albans should be directed to 179th St and not Jamaica Center.

    The presence of nearly 9,000 bus trips near Jamaica Center precludes what can be done to improve existing bus service. It’s simply too many buses in too little space. There are 14,000 buses going through the Lincoln Tunnel on an average weekday. They rate a grade separated route from the tunnel to their own bus terminal. Jamaica Center rates zilch.

  • ahwr

    My point was about all the people within a couple miles of the subway where there aren’t any stops. I know the MTA could come up with an estimate of how many people get on buses at stops near existing commuter rail stops, but they don’t like to share info. Anything public? How many buses do you actually get rid of?

  • sbauman

    This wouldn’t be a problem had NYC adopted and followed through on Paris’ policy of building a Metro entrance within half a mile (900 m) of every square centimeter in the City. All mayors, since Gaynor, could have been judged by how many more square feet of land were brought into compliance by his administration.

    Here’s a list of 8565 bus trips that were scheduled to stop within 1/2 mile of the Jamaica Center subway stop on 26 Jun 2016. They are listed by bus route. N.B. you should be able to cut and paste this into your favorite spreadsheet.

    “Q06”,367
    “Q08”,259
    “Q09”,206
    “Q1”,174
    “Q110”,235
    “Q111”,437
    “Q112”,187
    “Q113”,113
    “Q114”,141
    “Q17”,347
    “Q2”,191
    “Q20A”,166
    “Q20B”,117
    “Q24”,213
    “Q25”,361
    “Q3”,221
    “Q30”,349
    “Q31”,157
    “Q34”,139
    “Q36”,189
    “Q4”,338
    “Q40”,211
    “Q41”,180
    “Q42”,87
    “Q43”,384
    “Q44+”,372
    “Q5”,386
    “Q54”,255
    “Q56”,193
    “Q60”,236
    “Q65”,365
    “Q76”,71
    “Q83”,318
    “Q84”,195
    “Q85”,399
    “X64”,6

    You can see that your example of the Q111, Q113 and Q114 accounted for 691 such trips. Had these routes terminated at Locust Manor, instead of Jamaica Center, 2 miles would have been saved from each trip. This comes to operating savings of $8.2 million per year, based on MTA Bus’ operating cost of approximately $24/revenue-mile and 250 working days per year.

    You appear to know the territory better than me. Which other routes could be truncated to an LIRR station, if the LIRR shuttle trains I propose were implemented? You shouldn’t need the MTA to figure out a reasonably accurate answer. I shouldn’t trust an answer from the MTA, if they provided one.

  • ahwr

    I don’t think your plan makes all that much sense.

    Someone who gets on a Q111 at 147 should walk 1.1 miles to Locust manner, or ride the bus for a few stops and get dropped off at Locust Manner, take the LIRR shuttle to Jamaica, and transfer to the subway or another bus at Jamaica instead of just taking the Q111 all the way to Jamaica? And how do you terminate those buses at Locust Manner, it’s a couple miles from Jamaica without stopping, what about all the people who get on a bus between 137 and Jamaica? And what about all the intermediate travel along the corridor that you’d be disrupting by getting rid of the bus? Jamaica is a destination, it’s also a transfer point. You’re adding another leg to trips that often already have at least one transfer.

    BRT upgrades on Merrick and Guy R Brewer are needed. In addition to bus improvements discounted LIRR fares for non Manhattan bound trains is a great idea, and might ease crowding on the buses. I can’t tell you how much, but the MTA could give you a good guess.

    What there isn’t at rush hour is extra capacity west of Jamaica.

    Is this actually true? Is there no room for more trains to Brooklyn and Queens terminals? Or just no room to Manhattan? Instead of going to Richmond Hill could the MTA run a train to LIC or Atlantic? Adding some stations where there are long gaps, lowering fares for non Manhattan trains, and increasing frequency could serve some travelers. I don’t know how many.

    You don’t trust the MTA, but they’re in a position to give you a good guess. Someone swipes their metrocard to get on a bus and the time stamp matches the bustime timestamp for the Q111 they got on when it was at 137th, and then after the bus gets to Jamaica the same card gets swiped at the subway then you know there’s probably someone a reasonably short walk from the bus stop at 137th, and so also from the Locust manner station. Some share would be closer to the rail stop. Could give you an estimate for potential choice ridership, people who would prefer the rail shuttle. If the same card swipes into the subway nearish to Penn in the evening, then a bus at Jamaica matching when the subway would have gotten them there you have an estimate for how many might be served by LIRR to Manhattan too. MTA has lots of data that they don’t publish, and they are pretty awful about responding to FOIL requests.

  • ahwr

    The east river tunnels and the tracks leading to them are not at capacity right now. They might be given service patterns, but those can be changed. What I mean is you might be able to add more trains but only if all trains on the local tracks on the mainline make every stop or none of them make any stops west of Jamaica instead of some of them making stops. Double deckers would fit going to Penn, and the MTA does run some double decker (C3) loco pulled coaches. Might not work on every track in Penn, don’t know. And I think some of the branches have low overpasses that double decker trains wouldn’t fit under. Would the double decker trains take longer to unload, if the trains are sitting in the station longer do you end up with any capacity increase? I don’t know, but NJTransit has a lot of double decker trains so someone could look at loading/unloading times and come up with an answer.

    The ESA tunnel built in the 60s/70s doesn’t have clearance for double decker trains. When it opens some trains to Penn will go to Grand Central instead. Some new trains will be added. Some of the freed up space at Penn will be used for trains from New Haven instead.

  • ahwr

    Long Islanders will complain if you allow that in the afternoon, the dirty city people will take their seats and they’ll have to stand for the first ten or fifteen minutes of their trip.

  • sbauman

    I think it would be appropriate to define what should be before offering counter examples. My goal would be that a person within 1/2 mile of a rail station should be expected to walk to it. That would be the end of the story, had NYC followed the Paris Metro building example.

    Between 1/2 and 2 miles, a bike share system is the quickest solution. Buses would be the preferred mode when the distance to the rail station is more than 2 miles.

    Clearly, exceptions would have to be made for those not able to ride a bicycle. However, I believe a solution that covers 95% of the populace will yield a viable one for the remaining 5%.

    Cost and speed are the two factors for mode selection. Cost is the primary factor. It’s the reason the LIRR lost the Queens market to the IND and BMT subways between 1918 and 1936.

    The LIRR shuttle I propose would be cost neutral. There would be a free transfer at Jamaica between an LIRR shuttle and the subway for pay per ride customers.

    The bus running time between 147th and the Locust Manor station is approximately 7 minutes. The LIRR’s running time between Locust Manor and Jamaica is 6 minutes bringing the total running time up to 13 minutes. The scheduled running time for the bus between 147th Ave and Jamaica Center is 23 minutes.

    That’s a 10 minute savings at no additional cost. People will catch on.

    There are 4 tracks coming from the east into Jamaica: 2 on the main line, one each on the Atlantic and Montauk branches. There are 2 tracks leading to Penn Sta on the main line and 1 on the Atlantic Branch to Brooklyn. The Montauk Branch to LIC was never electrified north of the Glendale Junction and the LIRR’S vandalism removed the signals, when it transferred the tracks to NY&A.

    As I noted, the Atlantic Branch connection to Brooklyn will be severed, when ESA comes on board. That leaves 4 tracks merging into 2 tracks main line tracks west of Jamaica. That should be a pretty good start to justifying my statement regarding lack of capacity west of Jamaica.

    Here are some inconvenient truths regarding BRT. The MTA scheduled 43,863 local bus trips, 3417 ltd bus trips and 2803 sbs bus trips on 6/29/2016. The average speed for these services were: 8.08, 7.75 and 9.83 mph for the local, limited and sbs buses. That’s right, locals were faster than the limiteds. The average distance between bus stops is: 0.16 mi; 0.24 mi and 0.44 mi for the locals, limiteds and sbs buses respectively. This information is derived from the MTA’s published digital schedules.

    Let’s assume a person rides a bus for a typical 2.0 miles and has to walk half the distance between bus stops @ 3mph. What’s the total travel time, disregarding wait time? Answer: 16:27; 17:53 and 16:36 for the local, limited and sbs buses, respectively.

    How many FOIL requests do you think it would take to get the MTA and DOT to obtain this information?

    Adding SBS on Guy Brewer or Merrick isn’t going to provide much benefit from the bus rider’s perspective. N.B. each SBS stop costs approximately $75K for the pre-payment machinery. Cutting costs means keeping SBS stops to a bare minimum. This negates its travel speed advantage.

    The only way to increase travel speed is something that’s completely separated from the street grid. That’s what Bogata did on expressways that are wider than the LIE. It does not matter whether the vehicle rides on steel rails or asphalt. The LIRR is already there. I propose to more fully utilize its potential.

  • ahwr

    Here are some inconvenient truths regarding BRT. The MTA scheduled 43,863 local bus trips, 3417 ltd bus trips and 2803 sbs bus trips on 6/29/2016. The average speed for these services were: 8.08, 7.75 and 9.83 mph for the local, limited and sbs buses.

    That’s a ridiculous comparison. Can you come up with numbers just for limiteds and locals that exist on the same road? And only compare during peak hours? Or published data on speed improvements after SBS was introduced?

    My goal would be that a person within 1/2 mile of a rail station should be expected to walk to it.

    Existing stations offer very poor coverage. And you’re not serving the people who are making trips that end up before Jamaica.

    http://imgur.com/a/AGzBU

    http://tinyurl.com/zyal26h

    http://web.mta.info/nyct/maps/busqns.pdf

    Between 1/2 and 2 miles, a bike share system is the quickest solution. Buses would be the preferred mode when the distance to the rail station is more than 2 miles.

    With significant street redesigns to make cycling tolerable for 50% (95% is a pipe dream) of the population during rush hour there are still gaps.

    http://i.imgur.com/UIU9tEo.jpg

    Did you have in mind to change a bus – subway (- subway) ride to bike share – lirr shuttle – subway (- subway)? For long trips – the area has some of the longest commute times in the city – adding another transfer can be draining, even if the time is the same.

    The bus running time between 147th and the Locust Manor station is approximately 7 minutes. The LIRR’s running time between Locust Manor and Jamaica is 6 minutes bringing the total running time up to 13 minutes. The scheduled running time for the bus between 147th Ave and Jamaica Center is 23 minutes.

    You would need to add a couple minutes to walk to the train, and a wait for the transfer. Probably five minutes total. That’s half your time savings. What would camera enforced bus lanes, all door pre boarding payment, wider doors on buses etc…do for the the bus segments on Guy R Brewer and Farmers? Would the time for the two end up the same? Only one of them requires an extra transfer? You’re worried about $75k for an SBS stop, but you’re not worried about the cost of the new rail service? Or the cost of adding stations so

    Adding SBS on Guy Brewer or Merrick isn’t going to provide much benefit from the bus rider’s perspective.

    I’d wager for the vast majority of residents along those two corridors who don’t live within a five minute walk of an LIRR station it would benefit them more than the LIRR shuttle. Not to mention all those making trips along the road, rather than to Jamaica and points beyond.

    How many FOIL requests do you think it would take to get the MTA and DOT to obtain this information?

    MTA can tell you how many people use the local/limited stops they’re turning into SBS stops, and how many people use the ones they don’t. Without knowing how many people see that 15 minute walk added on, it isn’t very meaningful to talk about it. Just like without knowing how many people get on a bus near a train station, you can’t know how many would get the time savings you’re talking about. Once you walk to a corridor (necessary to get on a local, limited, or SBS) you walk an average of a quarter of the distance between stops with evenly distributed trip generation, not half the distance. And trip generation isn’t even, it’s weighted towards the limited and SBS stops.

    That’s what Bogata did

    To accommodate short trips of an average of a couple miles? Or for longer distance travel? You’re not running this shuttle to midtown, remember? You want a different approach for the feeder network. There are a lot of trips that end before Jamaica too. Don’t forget about them.

  • sbauman

    That’s a ridiculous comparison.

    Comparing averages is a fairly standard technique. It supplies the most likely value and least mean square error for most probability distributions.

    Can you come up with numbers just for limiteds and locals that exist on the same road?

    This would require an in depth route by route analysis, for which the MTA’s going rate is around $500K. Limiteds and locals frequently have different routes for part of the total trip.

    And only compare during peak hours?

    That’s a bit easier. I had the good sense to include the bus trip’s starting hour in the SQL. Here is the average mph for the 3 bus route types that you should be able to cut and past into a spreadsheet:

    “Hr”,”loc mph”,”ltd mph”,”sbs mph”
    0,11.27,,14.07
    1,12.05,,13.88
    2,12.77,,14.15
    3,12.66,,14.33
    4,11.58,11.57,14.60
    5,10.19,10.48,12.97
    6,8.56,9.32,11.06
    7,7.57,8.18,9.42
    8,7.68,8.01,9.16
    9,7.91,7.45,9.41
    10,7.89,7.08,9.27
    11,7.75,6.88,9.28
    12,7.61,6.78,9.19
    13,7.40,6.68,9.17
    14,7.07,6.51,8.70
    15,7.07,6.65,8.72
    16,7.12,7.23,8.84
    17,7.36,7.77,8.99
    18,7.86,8.50,9.78
    19,8.46,8.79,10.32
    20,8.88,9.23,11.05
    21,9.45,9.61,11.54
    22,10.03,10.14,12.13
    23,10.64,,13.38

    Or published data on speed improvements after SBS was introduced?

    Some of the published MTA/DOT speed improvement figures are suspect. This is what I discovered regarding the B44 report. First, the average distance traveled of the new SBS runs were considerably shorter than the prior limited distance. One should expect a decrease in the average end-to-end travel time due to the shorter distance. Second, they added considerably more SBS trips than the prior limiteds. The number of passengers remained constant. So, one would expect fewer passengers per trip on each SBS than on the prior limiteds. This can be extrapolated to fewer actual stops per trip and less dwell time. No corrections were made in the calculations for these two factors.

    Existing [lirr] stations offer very poor coverage. And you’re not serving the people who are making trips that end up before Jamaica.

    The importance of those not traveling beyond Jamaica is exaggerated. Case in point. According to the 2014 US Census LEHD data, there are 4545 private sector workers who work in NYC, in what the City Planning Commission designates as the Springfield Gardens North neighborhood. This 5 sided area area is roughly bordered by Baisley Blv, 150th St, Belt Pkwy, Springfield Blv and the LIRR. It includes the Locust Manor station and Guy Brewer Blv.

    Of these 4545 workers, 84% work in Jamaica or beyond. Approximately 5% work within 1 mile of where they live. These lucky people would most likely walk to work. The remaining 11%, would need transportation to locations closer than Jamaica.

    In designing a transportation system, it’s best to concentrate on biggest market and design for the smaller market as an add-on. The LIRR shuttle would handle 84%. The remaining 11% would still need bus transportation along Guy Brewer Blv. However, that should not be much of a challenge because 84% of the present bus traffic would have been removed by the LIRR shuttle. This is a much better procedure first designing for the 11% that need bus transportation and then somehow trying to shoehorn an additional 84% into that design.

  • ahwr

    Does the average local bus run on roads as congested as the average limited of SBS bus?

    This would require an in depth route by route analysis, for which the MTA’s going rate is around $500K. Limiteds and locals frequently have different routes for part of the total trip.

    How about use bustime to compare the overlapping segments?

    The LIRR shuttle would handle 84%.

    How exactly? Most people don’t live near the stations. Bus to LIRR to Jamaica adds a leg to the trip, the added wait time eats into the time savings from the grade separated segment, and a lot of people won’t want the extra transfer.

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