Tell Cornell — and Electeds — How You Want to Fix NYC Congestion

Want to tell elected officials what you think should be done about New York City traffic? Here’s a way to pool your policy suggestions with other New Yorkers and reach elected officials beyond your district.

smartparticipation
Image via SmartParticipation

The Cornell eRulemaking Initiative, or CeRI, hosts a moderated forum called “SmartParticipation,” developed to make it easier for people to weigh in on obscure federal rules. Now researchers want to see if the platform can help shape broader public policy initiatives, and the first issue they decided to tackle is “how to solve NY’s congestion problem.”

The hook is a little off-putting — the experts have had their say, now let’s hear from real New Yorkers! — but the discussion so far is largely on-point. The moderators respond to individual commenters with facts and data, and the site features a good bit of background info, including a Move NY video explainer.

Cornell’s Joshua Brooks told WNBC the comments will be collected in a report and sent “to every lawmaker in New York.” With the window of opportunity still open for Move NY as Governor Cuomo searches for ways to make good on his MTA funding pledge, it wouldn’t hurt for Streetsblog readers to get in a word or two.

You can comment on the site through December 1.

  • neroden

    I couldn’t comment on the site. So I’ll comment here:….

    Canal Street has a major problem with cut-through traffic avoiding the tolls. The toll on the Verazzano Narrows Bridge needs to be reversed to get the toll-avoiders out of Manhattan.

  • Joshua Brooks

    Neroden, why couldn’t you comment on the site; what was the issue?

  • ahwr

    Reversed as in you pay the toll entering Brooklyn instead of SI? Then the choice would be you pay the PA toll to get to SI and then the MTA toll to get to Brooklyn, or you pay the same PA toll to get to Manhattan and then go to Brooklyn for free on the Manhattan bridge. You’d get the same cut through traffic, just going the other way.

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