Map Out Which Streets Need Safety Fixes — It’s Now or Never

The city has received more than 7,500 comments on its Vision Zero map. Today’s the last chance to offer your input.

This is it — the last day to mark dangerous street conditions on the city’s official Vision Zero map. After today, agencies will start using the information from the map to make plans for safety improvements, so spend a few minutes this afternoon and tell the city where you want safer streets for walking and biking.

The map highlights arterial streets as well as the top pedestrian crash corridors in each borough and the sites of recent pedestrian fatalities. You can zoom in, click on an intersection, and use Google Street View to pinpoint the exact location you want to improve. Then you assign the problem a category like double parking, red light running, speeding, or failure to yield, and describe it in more detail.

If you want to tell the city that a location has too much speeding for people to feel safe biking, for instance, you would identify an intersection, select “speeding” as the category, and use the “comment” field to note how speeding endangers cyclists there.

In addition to the online map, the city has also hosted nine Vision Zero workshops in all five boroughs to gather ideas, and will use the information to develop pedestrian safety plans for each borough that will be released this fall.

Since launching the map in April, the city says there have been more than 7,500 comments about dangerous streets. While the map will continue to be available online after today, the city will no longer be accepting new suggestions. The map was developed by DOT, NYPD, and the Taxi and Limousine Commission, in conjunction with developers at OpenPlans, Streetsblog’s parent organization.

  • dave “paco” abraham

    Official email from Carlos Menchaca’s office today says the city got over 10K comments. Either way, this is good input. However, i do hope it’s not a matter of now or never. It’s now… or not just yet.

  • AnoNYC

    Throgs Neck, the Cross Bronx neighborhoods, the neighborhoods surrounding Edenwald, East Harlem, all of Queens East of the Van Wick, Richmond Hill, and East Brooklyn need way more representation.

  • Danny

    The neighborhoods in Brooklyn that are missing dots line up somewhat with the dots on the map on page 20 of this PDF. http://johnjayresearch.org/pri/files/2013/10/PRI-TQH-Report.pdf

  • I think the overlap of “conscientious users of the Vision Zero map” and “Streetsblog Readers” is nearly complete.

  • Mark Walker

    I’m struck by the fact that between 59th and 125th — basically the entire Upper West and Upper East Sides — the only east/west streets identified as “pedestrian crash corridors (top 10% of streets in each borough)” are W. 98th and 99th streets. I live there, of course. Now I know I’m not just a cranky old man.

  • Whoopdy Yeah

    Can anybody walk me through how to add something to this map? It doesn’t seem clear, and I can’t seem to do it!

  • WoodyinNYC

    I couldn’t even begin to make it work. For one, it seemed to require Facebook and I don’t play that. Well, I wasn’t too impressed with the alternatives presented. “Eliminate a lane of traffic from 8th Ave to widen the sidewalk near Port Authority Bus Terminal” just didn’t fit into the suggested choices.

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