Council Member Jackson “Pleased” With Cancellation of 125th Street SBS

Reactions have been rolling in since DOT and the MTA announced this morning that they are canceling plans for Select Bus Service on 125th Street.

Photo: ##http://council.nyc.gov/d7/html/members/home.shtml##NYC Council##

Council Member Robert Jackson, whose district includes West Harlem, welcomed the news. “He’s pleased that they listened to concerns and didn’t move forward with Select Bus Service,” Jackson spokesperson Frances Escano told Streetsblog. “He hopes that they come together and move forward with a whole study to come to complete solutions.” According to the 2000 Census, 78 percent of households in Jackson’s district do not own a car [PDF].

Update: Jackson’s office contacted us after publication, seeking to clarify his position. “DOT was only going to do Select Bus Service for the M60,” Escano said in a follow-up call. “If you’re going to do SBS, do it for all of them, don’t just do it for one.” While the M60 has a reputation as serving only LaGuardia customers, only one in ten M60 riders are going to the airport. Riders on local routes would also see faster service thanks to the bus lanes and parking management proposed in the SBS project. Scuttling the SBS project deprives all bus riders on 125th Street of faster service.

When Streetsblog asked whether Jackson believes dedicated bus lanes would benefit all 125th Street bus riders, Escano said only that the council member supports a comprehensive study. Escano would not say whether the council member supports specific improvements — such as dedicated lanes — that would improve trip times for bus riders.

At a forum last week, most candidates looking to succeed the term-limited Jackson, who is running for Manhattan borough president, said they support SBS on 125th Street. Council candidate Mark Levine e-mailed a statement to Streetsblog this afternoon calling the SBS cancellation “outrageous [and] nonsensical.”

After today’s SBS cancellation, WE ACT for Environmental Justice, the local advocacy group that initially led the push for better bus service in Harlem, said it will re-evaluate its approach. After Senator Bill Perkins hosted a town hall meeting where DOT announced that it had trimmed the bus plan, WE ACT did not host a counter-event or action. “We have to have a conversation about what strategy looks like moving forward,” said Jake Carlson, WE ACT’s transportation equity coordinator.

“We knew that there had been concerns from the community about the process around this project,” he said, adding that, despite numerous community meetings, a number of residents felt that DOT and the MTA were unresponsive. “We want to work to play a better role in trying to lead those conversations,” Carlson said.

Update: Carlson e-mailed Streetsblog with a clarification: “We stand with Senator Perkins in calling for a comprehensive planning process,” he said. “We also aren’t looking to ‘lead’ the conversations and be out in front of anyone… I don’t want folks to get the impression that we’re presuming to be out in front of the community boards and elected officials.”

DOT defended the SBS planning process and kept the door open for other bus improvements. “We held a thorough public process including 50 meetings with the community advisory committee, community boards, elected officials and other stakeholders,” DOT spokesperson Seth Solomonow said in an e-mailed statement. “We still hope to work to address these issues and improve bus service throughout the corridor in dialog with the community.”

Update: “After more than 50 meetings over the last year producing dramatic revisions to the project but no support from local community boards and elected officials,” Solomonow said in a follow-up statement, “It simply was not possible to proceed at this time.”

Despite the setback, advocates say improving 125th Street bus service is too important for the issue to go away. “At this point, it’s really up to the immediate communities to say what they want,” Tri-State Transportation Campaign Executive Director Veronica Vanterpool told Streetsblog. “The conversation needs to continue, and I think it will, because there are so many bus riders in that community.”

In a statement, MTA spokesperson Aaron Donovan said that improvements for bus riders would still be considered. “We do hope to have a continued dialogue with community stakeholders about ways that we can continue to improve bus speed and service… In the short term, we plan to work with the Community Boards to explore whether any parking or traffic improvements discussed during the SBS outreach process can improve 125th Street for all users.”

Update: In a statement, State Senator Adriano Espaillat, who represents the area west of Amsterdam Avenue, said that SBS would have “vastly improved public transit for uptown residents that rely on this bus line every day. It is disappointing that this balanced and sensible proposal has been canceled.”

Streetsblog is awaiting responses from City Council members Melissa Mark-Viverito and Inez Dickens, as well as State Senator Bill Perkins and Assembly members Robert J. Rodriguez and Keith L.T. Wright, who all represent areas along 125th Street. We also have an inquiry in with Transport Workers Union Local 100, which earlier this year said it will continue to contribute to Perkins’ re-election campaign, despite his opposition to SBS on 125th Street. We’ll let you know if we hear anything back.

  • Bluewndrpwrmlk96

    So I guess Council Member Jackson likes walking…because that’s now the fastest way to traverse 125th Street. Congratulations.

  • J

    I think Perkins and Jackson should be forced to sit in the bus each day during rush hour as it crosses the entirety of 125th. On the trip they should be forced to listen to a voice that reminds them that over 75% of their constituents don’t drive. This should be on repeat, over and over and over and over until the message gets through to them.

    My guess: neither Perkins nor Jackson EVER rides the bus. Why? Cause it’s slow.

  • Mark Walker

    Jackson is running for borough president? Excellent. I can vote against him, as can any Manhattan resident. Remember that name, folks. That’s the guy you want to vote against.

  • Mark Walker

    Jackson is running for borough president? Excellent. I can vote against him, as can any Manhattan resident. Remember that name, folks. That’s the guy you want to vote against.

  • Daphna

    Robert Jackson is term limited out after 12 years. Although it should have been 8 years but the city council all voted themselves a third term. He is popular in Harlem and many have expressed sadness that he is going but I do not see why. He should have been speaking up in favor of this plan when NY State Senator Bill Perkins was fighting against it. Now Jackson comes out against the plan – such a harmful attitude to have towards an area that he is supposed to represent and advocate for.

    Gale Brewer, Jessica Lappin, Robert Jackson and Julie Menin are running for Manhattan Boro President. Gale Brewer has a much better record than Jessica Lappin and Robert Jackson towards livable streets. Julie Menin’s platform says nothing either way about livable streets.

    Hopefully Mark Levine will win Robert Jackson’s city council seat. Mark Levine has an excellent platform regarding mass transit and street space re-allocation.

  • M60 Sufferer

    Adriano Espaillat ?@EspaillatNY 22m
    Decision to scrap plans for Select Bus Service on 125th St
    is disappointing. Would have led to faster commutes & safer pedestrians.
    #uptownCollapse

    4:34 PM – 16 Jul 13 · Details

  • PurpleNinjaTurtle

    Agreed. The fact that Levine is watching this issue so closely, and seems to understand it better than some already in elected positions is a positive sign for the neighborhood (and city for that matter).

  • Daphna

    I would guess that Melissa Mark-Viverito is unhappy that this plan was cancelled. The Community Board in her district, CB11, is the only one that supported this plan. The Transportation Committee of CB9 (Robert Jackson’s district) and CB10 (Inez Dickens district) were against the M60 SBS plan but neither of those committees are even functional.

    CB11 has a Transportation Committee where people attend and listen to the DOT presentations. In contrast: at the Transportation Committee of CB10 only TWO committee members attended the meeting when the DOT presented the revised plan of the 125th Street SBS. One of these two, the chair, left the room for the entire DOT presentation (to put a dirt bike club in touch with a reporter). Margaret Forgione herself was one of the DOT representatives at that meeting. Marcus Book from the MTA was also there. They were all presenting to a SINGLE committee member. (Three CB10 members who were not Transportation Committee members also came.) The chair of CB10 Transportation Committee later expressed that 125th Street is supposed to be slow and is okay that way.

    At the Transportation Committee of CB9 it is similarly dysfunctional. There are only five people on that committee. At any given meeting, two to three attend. At the meeting when the DOT presented the revised 125th Street SBS plan, again with a couple DOT representatives and one MTA spokeperson, they were all presenting to only TWO committee members. One of those members, the chair, (at least she stayed in the room for the presentation unlike her counterpart at CB10) was unable to comprehend the plan. She could not understand that the cut-in-half plan was different from the original. She could not understand that the cut-in-half plan was the same plan that had been presented at Bill Perkin’s meeting. She could not make any decision and kept saying she would have to take this plan to Perkin’s and ask him what to do. She kept complaining the DOT was not listening to community input and was pushing the same plan they had started with. She couldn’t comprehend the plan and couldn’t acknowledge the many changes made to it. Meanwhile, she is the chair and is supposed to be a leader.

    These Transportation Committees of CB9 and CB10 are completely non-functional. With only two people attending each meeting and with one chair incapable of understanding, and the other chair choosing not to even hear the presentation, there is no use even going to these Transportation Committees. They never have a quorum. They could never have a resolution. They would never arrange to bring the issue to the full Board.

    At least CB11 has a functioning Transportation Committee. But the Transportation Committee of CB11 thought this plan was such a slam dunk and thought they had leverage; they thought the city wanted to give them this SBS route so badly that they could afford to barter their support for it to force an unrelated change to the M35 route that they wanted. They definitely wanted it and never thought they would loose the whole thing. They made a big mistake.

  • Daphna

    Glad to hear he supports it but I wish Adriano Espaillat (NY State Senator District 31) had been speaking up sooner!

  • Daphna

    Glad to hear he supports it but I wish Adriano Espaillat (NY State Senator District 31) had been speaking up sooner!

  • Daphna

    Glad to hear he supports it but I wish Adriano Espaillat (NY State Senator District 31) had been speaking up sooner!

  • Daphna

    Glad to hear he supports it but I wish Adriano Espaillat (NY State Senator District 31) had been speaking up sooner!

  • Daphna

    Glad to hear he supports it but I wish Adriano Espaillat (NY State Senator District 31) had been speaking up sooner!

  • Daphna

    Glad to hear he supports it but I wish Adriano Espaillat (NY State Senator District 31) had been speaking up sooner!

  • Reader

    ”DOT was only going to do Select Bus Service for the M60,” Escano said in a follow-up call. “If you’re going to do SBS, do it for all of them, don’t just do it for one.”

    Am I reading this correctly? Is he saying that there’s no sense in choosing one route to improve because DOT isn’t improving them all at once?

    This is a common opposition tactic. Say you’re in favor of something, but set the bar so high that there’s no chance in hell of ever having to actually support it. Marty Golden wasn’t against speed cameras… he just wanted some sort of scientific study — not including the ones that had already been done — to show that they work. People on the Upper West Side weren’t against extending the Columbus Avenue bike lane, but until people started using a bike lane that connected to nowhere and nothing, they couldn’t justify extending it.

    NYC will never get anywhere with these “leaders” in place. Meanwhile, the rest of the world is leaving us behind.

  • Reader

    ”DOT was only going to do Select Bus Service for the M60,” Escano said in a follow-up call. “If you’re going to do SBS, do it for all of them, don’t just do it for one.”

    Am I reading this correctly? Is he saying that there’s no sense in choosing one route to improve because DOT isn’t improving them all at once?

    This is a common opposition tactic. Say you’re in favor of something, but set the bar so high that there’s no chance in hell of ever having to actually support it. Marty Golden wasn’t against speed cameras… he just wanted some sort of scientific study — not including the ones that had already been done — to show that they work. People on the Upper West Side weren’t against extending the Columbus Avenue bike lane, but until people started using a bike lane that connected to nowhere and nothing, they couldn’t justify extending it.

    NYC will never get anywhere with these “leaders” in place. Meanwhile, the rest of the world is leaving us behind.

  • Reader

    ”DOT was only going to do Select Bus Service for the M60,” Escano said in a follow-up call. “If you’re going to do SBS, do it for all of them, don’t just do it for one.”

    Am I reading this correctly? Is he saying that there’s no sense in choosing one route to improve because DOT isn’t improving them all at once?

    This is a common opposition tactic. Say you’re in favor of something, but set the bar so high that there’s no chance in hell of ever having to actually support it. Marty Golden wasn’t against speed cameras… he just wanted some sort of scientific study — not including the ones that had already been done — to show that they work. People on the Upper West Side weren’t against extending the Columbus Avenue bike lane, but until people started using a bike lane that connected to nowhere and nothing, they couldn’t justify extending it.

    NYC will never get anywhere with these “leaders” in place. Meanwhile, the rest of the world is leaving us behind.

  • Reader

    ”DOT was only going to do Select Bus Service for the M60,” Escano said in a follow-up call. “If you’re going to do SBS, do it for all of them, don’t just do it for one.”

    Am I reading this correctly? Is he saying that there’s no sense in choosing one route to improve because DOT isn’t improving them all at once?

    This is a common opposition tactic. Say you’re in favor of something, but set the bar so high that there’s no chance in hell of ever having to actually support it. Marty Golden wasn’t against speed cameras… he just wanted some sort of scientific study — not including the ones that had already been done — to show that they work. People on the Upper West Side weren’t against extending the Columbus Avenue bike lane, but until people started using a bike lane that connected to nowhere and nothing, they couldn’t justify extending it.

    NYC will never get anywhere with these “leaders” in place. Meanwhile, the rest of the world is leaving us behind.

  • Reader

    ”DOT was only going to do Select Bus Service for the M60,” Escano said in a follow-up call. “If you’re going to do SBS, do it for all of them, don’t just do it for one.”

    Am I reading this correctly? Is he saying that there’s no sense in choosing one route to improve because DOT isn’t improving them all at once?

    This is a common opposition tactic. Say you’re in favor of something, but set the bar so high that there’s no chance in hell of ever having to actually support it. Marty Golden wasn’t against speed cameras… he just wanted some sort of scientific study — not including the ones that had already been done — to show that they work. People on the Upper West Side weren’t against extending the Columbus Avenue bike lane, but until people started using a bike lane that connected to nowhere and nothing, they couldn’t justify extending it.

    NYC will never get anywhere with these “leaders” in place. Meanwhile, the rest of the world is leaving us behind.

  • Reader

    ”DOT was only going to do Select Bus Service for the M60,” Escano said in a follow-up call. “If you’re going to do SBS, do it for all of them, don’t just do it for one.”

    Am I reading this correctly? Is he saying that there’s no sense in choosing one route to improve because DOT isn’t improving them all at once?

    This is a common opposition tactic. Say you’re in favor of something, but set the bar so high that there’s no chance in hell of ever having to actually support it. Marty Golden wasn’t against speed cameras… he just wanted some sort of scientific study — not including the ones that had already been done — to show that they work. People on the Upper West Side weren’t against extending the Columbus Avenue bike lane, but until people started using a bike lane that connected to nowhere and nothing, they couldn’t justify extending it.

    NYC will never get anywhere with these “leaders” in place. Meanwhile, the rest of the world is leaving us behind.

  • Daphna

    Although only the M60 would have been SBS, all the 125th Street crosstown buses, the Bx15, the M100, the M101 would have benefited from the dedicated bus lane that would have been created. Tourist buses and inter-city buses would also have benefited.

  • Pepe

    No local elected official other than Sen. Perkins weighed in on this SBS plan at any point since it was proposed by DOT and NYCT.

  • Alon Levy

    Sorry, but Jackson is right. Bus lanes on 125th Street are a good thing (on all of it, not just a few blocks); they are also completely independent of SBS. There are bus lanes on Madison and 5th, but no SBS.

    The question of why DOT chose the M60 rather than the Bx15, M100, or M101 also has an obvious answer. It is not the highest-trafficked of the four routes that use 125th; its ridership rank among the four routes is 3. Despite recent growth, its ridership is not much more than half that of the M101. It is just the route connecting Morningside Heights with Queens rather than Washington Heights with Lexington Avenue or Manhattanville with Third Avenue in the Bronx.

    The one-route-per-borough gimmick was understandable even if it put Hylan ahead of Utica, but now that DOT is adding more routes, we need to ask why 34th Street and the whitest 125th Street route are getting SBSified ahead of Utica, Grand Concourse, Flatbush, the M101, and the top main Brooklyn circumferentials. We need to ask why Bloomberg spent city money on the 7 extension instead of of Phase 2 of Second Avenue Subway, or Triboro (already studied by the RPA by 2007), or Utica, or Nostrand. We need to ask why people entertain the subway to Secaucus while those higher-performing lines are ignored. Phase 1 of SAS happens to be excellent transit while also serving a high-income area, but there are very good projects serving lower-income areas that should have been funded ahead of the 7 extension (though behind SAS Phase 1) and should be funded ahead of the 7 to Secaucus.

  • Guest

    I was very favorably impressed with Robert Jackson a decade ago when he supported the improvements for Marcus Garvey Circle, creating a more rational vehicular traffic pattern and much more pleasant pedestrian environment. There were opponents from adjacent buildings who were angry they wouldn’t be able to continue parking illegally to unload their groceries (apparently they didn’t use the grocery store that is a rent-paying tenant in their co-op?). They were making the typical arguments about not being consulted, trying to create more process, etc. and Robert Jackson stood up and eloquently talked about the extensive community consultation that had gone into the project.

    Too bad that’s not the Robert Jackson who is speaking up now.

  • Andrew

    I’m sorry, this is just plain ignorant.

    Total boardings is meaningless, since all four bus routes are much longer than their 125th Street segments, and certainly most trips on the M101 and Bx15, and probably also on the M100, don’t even include any portion 125th Street.

    In terms of boardings along 125th Street, the M60 wins, with 9,682 in 2011 (compared to 8,838 on the Bx15, 7,198 on the M101, and 6.912 on the M100). (Source)

    It’s also best suited for SBS. Aside from the east-west segment on 125th Street, the M100 and M101 operate entirely parallel to and a short distance from the subway, and are therefore most useful for relatively short-haul trips. The Bx15 in the Bronx runs closely parallel to the brand new Bx41 SBS (the 3rd Avenue and Webster Avenue corridors were both in the running for SBS, but Webster won out).

    And in its role as an airport bus, the lion’s share of M60 riders board at transfer points from the subway, unlike the other routes, which serve more local traffic.

    Bus lanes are not independent of SBS. Neither is contingent on the other, but most if not all of the recent bus lane implementations have come as part of the SBS package. All four bus routes would have been able to use the bus lanes, not only the M60, so this SBS project would have benefited all 125th Street bus riders.

  • Andrew

    By the way, it’s amusing to read this sort of conspiracy theory two weeks after the implementation of SBS on Webster Avenue.

  • callmeL

    I am incredibly confused on why leaders voted to keep a slow bus route instead of gaining a more efficient one. It seems like it would have been a step in the right direction. I have taken the M60 to the aiport and found it incedibly convenient to get to LGA. I noticed that many people take it to get to the LGA for flights, or to get to work from uptown or connect from Metro North. Don’t people understand that we need to start somewhere? Why should MTA “do it for all of them” when there is no proof yet? Why not be smart about it, get the stats once SBS is implemented for the M60, then make the point with evidence?

  • Alon Levy

    First, if people are using the M100/101 to get from north of Manhattanville to East Harlem, only half the traffic will show up as “boardings on 125th Street.” (Same is of course true of M60 traffic to LGA, but the argument being made here is that it’s totally not about LGA.)

    Second, the M15 is parallel to the subway; it’s farther away from it than the M100/101, but doesn’t have the east-west bend at all. The B44 overlaps the subway in its middle part.

    Third, 10,000 boardings wouldn’t make SBS even on 34th Street. So if it’s about LGA, it’s entirely appropriate to ask why LGA riders are being prioritized over 50,000 Utica riders.

    Fourth, you’re making my point for me about bus lanes and SBS. The MTA has sold them as a package, so now that Jackson’s understandably pissed that the only SBS-ified route is the one to LGA, he scuttled the bus lanes too not realizing the bus lane component is for 125th Street whereas SBS for the M60 is separate. But people here think it’s offensive to suggest DOT is racist, and it’s easier to blame Jackson than DOT.

    I can’t explain Webster (or Third). Could be a used-to-be-an-el-there thing. Could be that DOT is implementing things in a random fashion. The choice of route does not suggest any prioritization based on traffic.

  • Anonymous

    I think both boardings on 125th St. and total boardings (or rather, the number of people who happen to be on board on 125th St.) are significant. The first because it determines how much time can be saved by off-board fare collection; the second, because it determines how many people benefit from a faster bus.

  • Alon Levy

    They’d have to have off-board fare collection everywhere, though. A passenger who pays the driver at Columbia going eastbound then won’t have a receipt to show the inspectors on 125th.

  • Dan

    Hopefully this will put your conspiracy theories to rest: http://www.nyc.gov/html/brt/downloads/pdf/intro_to_brt_phase2.pdf

    The 125th Street corridor was identified early on as a potential BRT corridor, as was LGA/Elmhurst. Also, LGA serves 60,000 passengers a day, and this could potentially dramatically induce a mode shift away from cars.

    Also, why not those other corridors? Well maybe…but after 125th St. Grand Concourse and Lexington Ave have subways and Flatbush Ave. does for the higher density parts. Utica Ave is a narrow street, not as well suited to taking away lanes of auto traffic for buses. 125th Street is W I D E.

  • Anonymous

    I’m really confused by the opposition. On the one hand, I hear they don’t want SBS because it is a “shopping district” where traffic is supposed to go slow. On the other, they want SBS on ALL buses.

    Can someone clarify this?

  • Anonymous

    I think it’s about free parking, both legal and illegal.

  • Anonymous

    You’re probably right. Thanks.

  • Bolwerk

    I don’t think DOT is racist. I think Webster just didn’t have the electeds and community board standing against it the way Harlem did.

    That said, the problem is probably more classism than racism: the major beneficiaries are poor blacks, and nobody is there to speak for them. Jackson’s/Perkin’s relationship with blacks is not so different from Quinn’s with the LGBT community; she is for equal rights in some ways, but ultimately isn’t especially concerned with poverty or even discrimination against the impoverished in that community.

  • PromoterMotor Poster-Distribut

    Robert Jackson, in my opinion, is a spineless coward who will do nothing when it comes to fighting for neighborhoods. When a local civic group in Inwood asked him to support the cause of getting a liquor license renewal denied because of noise, fights, public urination, yelling, screaming, double parking and other quality of life problems, his response was that he’d have to ask the other politicians in the district first. Then he said no to the request. This indicates that Mr. Jackson does not fight for neighborhoods as he indicated in his speech. Frankly, he has been ineffective in fighting for the tenants who were wholly besieged with quality of life problems that he refused to get involved with–for years. Vote no to Jackson. You’ll be better off.

  • Boris

    “We also have an inquiry in with Transport Workers Union Local 100, which earlier this year said it will continue to contribute to Perkins’ re-election campaign, despite his opposition to SBS on 125th Street.”

    If anything, they now support him MORE, because bus drivers believe SBS is MTA’s secret plan to cut driver jobs by allowing a given service level with fewer drivers through articulated buses and faster runs. (This is possible in theory, but not happening in practice as SBS usually implies more service).

  • Andrew

    People traveling entirely on 125th Street (at least between Lex and Amsterdam) are indifferent – they’ll take whichever bus comes first, whether it’s the M60 or M100 or M101 or Bx15. So they’re not a very interesting group to focus on, and I’m not sure why you’re bringing them up. People on 125th Street have reason to go elsewhere, and vice versa – and it appears that, of the four bus options, the M60 is somewhat more useful to them than the others. For some, it’s the airport (whether for travel or for work – transit tends to serve a lot of airport employees). For others, it’s East Elmhurst or Astoria or Morningside Heights.

    Aside from its jog across 125th Street – which most M101 riders don’t encounter – almost the entire M101 route is within one block of the subway. (The southbound M101 from 125th to Grand Central is directly above the subway.) The M15 is two long blocks east of the M101.

    Total route ridership is absolutely meaningless in determining suitability for SBS. Ridership per mile is a more interesting metric. Scheduled frequency is also an interesting metric, because it serves as a proxy for ridership at the peak load point. The nature of the ridership – are boardings relatively evenly distributed from stop to stop, or are some stops much busier than others? – plays an important role in the decision. And the extent to which the route complements the subway system is also important. The reason total M101 ridership is so high is that it is a very long route.

    DOT’s presentations have been plenty clear that the bus lanes are available to all four bus routes. If Jackson is not aware of that simple fact, it’s because he hasn’t been paying attention – and it’s his job to pay attention before taking a position.

    You seem to be working under the assumption that the only criterion for SBS-suitability is total ridership, when in fact it is a minor criterion at best. That SBS is in place on the Bx12 and the Bx41 and soon the B44 makes it pretty clear that racism is not at play. And I’m particularly amused that you consider the choice of the M60, which mostly serves minority neighborhoods, over the M101, which serves some of the wealthiest parts of the city from 96th all the way down to Cooper Union, as a sign of racism.

  • Andrew

    I don’t know if this is the TWU’s official position, but I’ve asked a few bus drivers how they feel about SBS, and they love it – fare disputes are no longer their problem.

  • Ricardo

    I don’t understand why people still see Robert Jackson as a great politician. HARLEM WAKE UP! THIS MAN HAS DONE LITTLE FOR THE NEIGHBORHOOD. Instead, he supported Columbia’s University expansion, which displaced many small business and long term families. I bet if you go pass 135st, you can count how many people know this man.

    Makes it even worst, that he is supporting MARK LEVINE for City Council. A man that doesn’t even reside in the district! MARK LEVINE is being supported by the same elected officials, that have done little for the working class and the low income families between 96st to 155st. I bet I can ask any supporter of this man, to tell me 5 policies or progressive changes made by his endorsements and they won’t be able to tell me.

    THE UNEDUCATED VOTER, will continue to make mistakes voting for individuals like Jackson and the candidate he believes will represent him in District 7 Mark Levine. THEY BOTH, WON’T BE GETTING MY VOTE. Go fool someone else.

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