Citi Bike Member Packets Include Cycling-Near-Trucks Safety Tips

Yesterday we had a feisty exchange of posts between Charles Komanoff and Nicole Gelinas about what the city should do to enhance safety for Citi Bike users (and everyone else).

One of Gelinas’s main suggestions is to educate bike-share users about how to interact safely with trucks, and it turns that there’s a big graphic about this in DOT’s Bike Smart brochure [PDF], which is distributed to all annual bike-share members in the packet that comes with their key fobs. Word is that the city is looking into getting the same message across to daily and weekly users too.

It’s good advice for anyone who bikes on NYC streets. Here’s a look:

  • Anonymous

    Or walks!

  • Anonymous

    “At intersections, the dashed line with chevrons indicates that cars may turn across your path.”

    Huh. I always thought they meant I got a turbo boost for riding over them.

  • The graphic in the written materials is good. They should put a simple phrase on the handlebars, as in Paris. (Or, at the very least, put it on the kiosks.)

  • The graphic in the written materials is good. They should put a simple phrase on the handlebars, as in Paris. (Or, at the very least, put it on the kiosks.)

  • Anonymous

    I haven’t gotten my key yet. I signed up on day one. Cry.

  • Joe R.

    In general, you should never pass anyone on the right near intersections, not just trucks. The brochure has pictures illustrating that on page shown and the previous page. Good job as that’s one of the major ways cyclists get into collisions.

  • Anonymous

    This is good. I see a lot of riders who don’t seem to realize that large trucks drive differently than cars and small trucks. A lot of large truck drivers will move left before executing a right turn, and it is dangerous to try to pass on the right during this maneuver because the cyclist often ends up in the blind spot as the truck is turning.
    Now if there could just be some type of similar safey info distributed to truck drivers

  • Morris Zapp

    This is so much better than getting these unsafe trucks off the streets.

    I assume a similar brochure will be sent out to every household in NYC where anyone owns a bike or a pair of shoes.

    Thanks NYC!

  • James Reefer

    They actually do take safety classes as part of the CDL – it’s just much, much harder to drive a semi on city streets than people imagine. We should do what the French and Pakistani’s do, and make them deliver only at night.

  • Clarke

    I’m in the same boat. Trying to not worry until Friday.

  • You’re not alone. My wife and I signed up on day one and we’re still waiting. If it doesn’t come tomorrow I might start to freak out.

  • That’s a good suggestion about the handlebars. There is already a simple statement of road safety/legal obligations on the kiosks, which I think is also very smart.

  • Actually, cars shouldn’t turn across your path unless they’re ahead of you, and really they should be looking behind to make sure they’re not cutting off the bike lane. If the city’s position is that cutting off bikes is legal for cars, then we have a serious issue with the whole “bikes are vehicles except when they’re not” structure

  • Joe R.

    The city’s position on this seems to be bicycles are vehicles when it comes to ticketing them for breaking traffic laws, but are not vehicles if they inconvenience motorists in the slightest way (i.e. NYPD ticketing cyclists for not riding in the bike lane).

  • that nonsense needs to end quickly.

  • I am underwhelmed with the brochure (I realize actually have a pile of them in my office) as a safety tool. The truck advice is in the last half, after a spread explaining the bikes-in-buildings law, something about how to lock up your bike, and a guide to the different kinds of bike lanes.

    The first thing after the cheery cover picture is a two-page spread on biking laws, then a spread on helmets (not mandatory for adults), then locking your bike and the bikes-in-buildings law (irrelevant to bike-share users), then a Manhattan bike map excerpt and a “Know Your Lanes” guide.

    Probably most people flip through and then throw it away before even seeing the part about trucks.

  • David Buccola

    Never assume anybody in a motor vehicle sees you.

  • I haven’t got mine yet and I am getting nervous – logged in and checked that I didn’t mistype my address, which I didn’t. Hopefully they didn’t hire Cletus the Slack Jawed Yokel to do the mailing.

  • Anonymous

    Glad to see my wife and I are in good company … waiting.

  • Ben Kintisch

    Wait a second. Do the Citibike people realize that Mr. Ben Fried, the Streetsblog guy, is still waiting for his fob? Not cool, Citibike. I think I need to call NY Post with a new bike share hatchet job to report! Stop the presses!

  • JL

    More tips—less than 10% of nyc drivers use their turn signals before the turn, and half of those are inadvertent or mistakes. Drivers will play with their iPhones, but cyclists should pull over and stop for everyone’s sake.

  • JL

    More tips—less than 10% of nyc drivers use their turn signals before the turn, and half of those are inadvertent or mistakes. Drivers will play with their iPhones, but cyclists should pull over and stop for everyone’s sake.

  • Andy B from Jersey

    Maybe NYCDoT shouldn’t design bike lanes that put bicyclists to the right (or left) of turning motor traffic. Such facilities lead cyclists to pull up next to motor traffic only to have the trap close on them. The Bike Box is the worst at leading unsuspecting novice cyclists into exactly this deadly scenario.

    BTW – CitiBike in conjunction with Bike New York, is providing free bike education classes to CitiBike members at bike shops throughout the service area.

  • Andy B from Jersey

    Maybe NYCDoT shouldn’t design bike lanes that put bicyclists to the right (or left) of turning motor traffic. Such facilities lead cyclists to pull up next to motor traffic only to have the trap close on them. The Bike Box is the worst at leading unsuspecting novice cyclists into exactly this deadly scenario.

    BTW – CitiBike in conjunction with Bike New York, is providing free bike education classes to CitiBike members at bike shops throughout the service area.

  • kevd

    unless you are on the left side of a one way street, like 6th ave.
    then you SHOULD pass them on the right…. inside of their possible turn.

  • Joe Enoch

    I still haven’t received mine yet either, and neither have my coworkers and friends who signed up on the first day. The Post and the Daily News will finally have a legitimate story if the keys don’t arrive in time.

  • The Driver

    Why do we continue to allow semi-trucks on NYC surface streets?

  • Anonymous

    Ditto. What we need is to eliminate those behemoths from the city streets. No week passes by on my commute without seeing one of these knocking down street signs, bus shelters, damaging power wires or overpasses. They don’t belong in the city.

  • Kantcant

    Really? Look I ride and cyclists are the biggest scofflaws out there. Tell me the number of times you see a bike going the wrong way down a street vs a car. Don’t loose your credibility on these issues. Once all bikers follow the traffic laws at least as well as vehicles do, we will all get more respect and our share of the road.

  • Joe R.

    What does that have do with what I said? The NYPD is happy to ticket cyclists who don’t follow traffic laws, but refuses at the same time to acknowledge any laws which favor bicycles. How often does the NYPD ticket cars for blocking bike lanes, for example? And what’s with ticketing cyclists for not riding in the bike lane? The law specifically states a cyclist may leave the bike lane if they deem it unsafe for any reason, and yet the NYPD illegally tickets cyclists for doing just that. If they’re not going to enforce the laws which help us, then at least stop enforcing the laws against us.

    And I’m fed up hearing garbage about how cyclists are such scofflaws. They’re no better and no worse than any other group. Motorists may not drive against traffic much, but nearly all of them speed, run red lights, yap on their cell phones, and fail to yield to crossing pedestrians. And just about all pedestrians jaywalk. When you say “Once all bikers follow the traffic laws at least as well as vehicles do” I take that to mean not at all. Last I checked motorists in these parts pretty much ignore most traffic laws, and routinely get away with it.

  • moocow

    “Biggest scofflaws”? Jaywalkers? Wall Street bankers? NYPD parking permit holders?
    I don’t know why people think car drivers will ever respect cyclists if cyclists would just behave. Drivers have nothing to gain, and everything to lose and they show this by underfunding, disrespecting and threatening cyclists and their rights.
    Yes, cyclists break laws, which is bad, but “biggest scofflaws”? Who damages (kills, injures) more street users, cars or bikes or jaywalking peds? Good luck in your fantasy land.

  • callmeL

    This applies to SUVs, trucks and vans too

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