Reality Check: Bike-Share Station Takes Up Less Space Than Parked Cars

Curb space in front of 99 Bank Street then ...

You have to hand it to residents of 99 Bank Street. The lawsuit to have a bike-share station removed from the street in front of their West Village building is a textbook example of reactionary NIMBYism.

The suit, which has already been rejected in court, claims the station violates a rule against the placement of “street furniture,” and blocks the building entrance. Among the other reported complaints: the bike-share station will impede fire truck access, cause tourists to ride on the sidewalks, and lead to cyclists congregating under the building awning when it rains.

The suit also says the city’s bike-share program “presents a serious threat to public safety,” according to the Daily News.

Reality check: Bike-share has a great safety record. And as for building access, this Citi Bike station, which will hold 31 bikes, replaced a handful of car parking spots that occupied the same curb space, but with taller, blockier objects. If anything, May and her dog Pippin will have an easier time crossing the street mid-block now that there aren’t parked cars hogging curb space and cutting off the view of oncoming traffic.

… and now. Photos: Google Maps, DNAinfo
  • Mark Walker

    The argument about fire truck access also made no sense. Why is it that bikes — but not cars — are impediments to fire trucks? And how can the bike racks block the building entrance if they’re on the street and the building lets out onto the sidewalk?

  • J

    In the current situation in NYC, most people don’t have direct access to the curb in front of their building. There are cars parked against the curb, with gaps between cars maybe every 20 feet or so. Now there are bikes, with gaps between bikes every 4 feet or so. There’s a good reason why this lawsuit was thrown out almost immediately.

  • J

    In the current situation in NYC, most people don’t have direct access to the curb in front of their building. There are cars parked against the curb, with gaps between cars maybe every 20 feet or so. Now there are bikes, with gaps between bikes every 4 feet or so. There’s a good reason why this lawsuit was thrown out almost immediately.

  • Anonymous

    I’d be interested in the specifics of the lawsuit.

    Any redress with the City needs to be an Article 78 proceeding which my understanding requires you to exhaust all your administrative remedies. So, first you need to complain to DoT and appeal the location . . . which I’m sure they didn’t do.

  • I think people are under the assumption that the number of docks in the system = the number of bicycles in the system. They therefore picture that their access to the street will be completely impeded once the bikes are delivered.

    That’s not how it works. The whole point is to have more docks than bikes to
    keep the system as convenient as possible. With some exceptions, many stations will generally have a fair number of empty docks at any given time, and I’d imagine the one on Bank Street to fall into that category. So given that cars are often parked mere inches from each other up and down an entire curb, docking stations like these can actually IMPROVE pedestrian access to the street!

  • Eric McClure

    Somebody has to say it: f**k you, NIMBYs. Enough of your nonsensical anti-bike, anti-bike share, anti-urban and anti-complete streets garbage. Jane Jacobs must be spinning in her grave.

  • Clarke

    Having issues is totally fair…but waiting a year after station locations were announced to make them known is just asking for people to not take the complaints or issues seriously.

  • Jared Rodriguez

    Too obvious, Mark. It’s too obvious. The answer is: these people are nuts.

  • Joe R.

    I’m getting to feel this way myself. If these NIMBYs hate everything we’re doing in NYC, I have one answer-leave. Go to some small town where nothing ever changes. It shouldn’t be THIS hard to make the relatively minor changes we’re making. NYC, like any big city, is always in a state of constant flux. If you’re the type who finds change disconcerting instead of exhilarating, maybe it’s not the kind of place for you, and you should find someplace more suitable. That goes double for those who want to drive everywhere. Plenty of places exist which accommodate a car-oriented lifestyle if that’s your cup of tea. If fact, those places outnumber by far places where you can get along without a car. I’ve had it with these people. As my late father used to so elegantly say-if you don’t like it, then get the f out. There is no shortage of people who actually *want* to live in a city which is headed the way New York is. High housing prices are proof of that.

  • Andrew

    I suppose May and her dog Pippin used to climb over parked cars?

  • NOT DOT

    less space because there are NO bikes! How come you have to back the bike out into traffic? Good thinking, DOT!!

  • Anonymous

    Huh? Do people lose their eyesight when they touch a bike? Can’t they look, before moving the bike? How do cars parked on the sidewalk enter the street? Considering they are parked in the directon of traffic, even they have to look behind to see the cars coming when entering the street.

    Some of the complaints are just so thoughtless and ridiculous I have to wonder how freakin stupid the people who think them must be.

  • There are now bike corrals all over the city that require people to do just this. No fatalities yet.

    And how do drivers get in and out of cars on the traffic side?

    Agree with @addicted4444:disqus so here’s a helpful tip: before you throw out a potential danger of the bike share system, replace all instances of the word “bike” with “car” and see if it still works.

    It also shows how little so many so-called cultured New Yorkers travel or read about the rest of the world. How depressing.

  • Max Power

    I’m wondering when some enraged NIMBY will crash a car through a set of bikes racked up in an on-street dock. And then if the NYPD does anything to track the driver down

  • Eric McClure

    Oh, good god. How difficult is that? That block probably sees 25 cars an hour.

  • david

    to be fair – there seems to be very little issues so far. 1 building in the W village and 1 guy posting flyers in Fort Greene

  • Joe R.

    Yeah, I know but unfortunately the papers are giving the NIMBYs a disproportionate share of the coverage.

  • Joe R.

    Yeah, I know but unfortunately the papers are giving the NIMBYs a disproportionate share of the coverage.

  • Joe R.

    Yeah, I know but unfortunately the papers are giving the NIMBYs a disproportionate share of the coverage.

  • Joe R.

    Yeah, I know but unfortunately the papers are giving the NIMBYs a disproportionate share of the coverage.

  • Joe R.

    Yeah, I know but unfortunately the papers are giving the NIMBYs a disproportionate share of the coverage.

  • Joe R.

    Yeah, I know but unfortunately the papers are giving the NIMBYs a disproportionate share of the coverage.

  • CheapSkate

    Apparently DOT has made some adjustments to the Bank Street BikeShare station.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/new-york/city-removes-bike-share-rack-article-1.1331475

  • Anonymous

    I see dumb people […] Walking around like regular people […] They only see what they want to see. They don’t know they’re dumb.

  • ff

    these racks are ugly and take up precious space for some of us who commute to westchester. f bloomberg–he should take his racks, his bikes and his sodas and shove them up his ass. just stick to stop and frisk the only good thing u have done.

  • Anonymous

    Just wait… Give it some time. Biking-sharing is amazing. Everyone complained about Times Square too — does anyone really want it to go back to what it was?

  • Anonymous

    Just wait… Give it some time. Biking-sharing is amazing. Everyone complained about Times Square too — does anyone really want it to go back to what it was?

  • Anonymous

    Just wait… Give it some time. Biking-sharing is amazing. Everyone complained about Times Square too — does anyone really want it to go back to what it was?

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