Last-Minute Venue Change for Fort Greene/Clinton Hill Bike-Share Meeting

This just in: Council Member Tish James has moved the location of tonight’s neighborhood forum about bike-share. The meeting starts at 6:30 and the new location is: Sacred Heart Church, 30 Clermont Avenue between Flushing and Park.

  • Ben Kintisch

    Is there a bike share station in front of the church? Just kidding.

  • moocow

    On the other side of the BQE, just up the hill!

  • Ben Kintisch

    nice moocow.

  • Ben Kintisch

    Are cows allowed to use bikeshare too? Answer: as long as they are over 16 and have a credit card!

  • Bronxite

    How did it go?

  • I went to this thing. It was like being at one of those Health Care Town Halls from middle America with all the low-information “Tea Party” voters screaming at anyone trying to talk truth to crazy.

    i.e. “I look out the window everyday and I’ve never seen a single person using it!” or “Why are there all of these stations within just a few blocks of each other?! Why aren’t they all under the BQE?!”

    There were plenty of enlightened people there as well, but they were weighted towards the back of the line, so all the angry shouting mouth-breathers got to speak first when all the cameras were rolling. Sigh.

  • Ben Kintisch

    Daniel, I’m glad you went. I sent an email directly to Tish James and she replied personally within minutes. She remains unwavering in her support of this positive new program in her district. I think she needs to hear from other supportive folks within her district and from other parts of Brooklyn. Tell her that it is a good development for Brooklyn, and, better still, that bike share in Ft. Greene makes you more likely to visit and spend money there.

  • moocow

    I personally loved the guy who was all mad that the racks don’t have any bikes in them. They aren’t even being used as promised!
    I felt pretty positive about the meeting right when it was done, probably because Tish James is a natural leader and I was very impressed with her.
    Then later, on the ride home, I got sad, frustrated and kept wondering what I had done with the previous 2.5 hours.

  • Jared Rodriguez

    This is why most people don’t attend community meetings (which is sad). They are overrun by whackjobs. Isn’t there a way to regulate this?

  • moocow

    Aren’t we all somebody else’s whackjob?

    I found people were rude, and misinformed (which was their fault) and just so freaking entitled to their free on street parking, I wasn’t sure why I was there. I support bikeshare, but the “where are we going to park for free” screamers, I am embarrassed they can’t see their selfishness, embarrassed they are whom I call fellow New Yorkers.

  • Anonymous

    At least they admit it’s really about parking and not about historical preservation.

    We just need to hold our ground until it’s implemented as I’m sure nearly all of these NIMBY’s will come around. Because honestly, it’s for their benefit and they will use it.

  • Cartola

    I went to this too – it was a bit crazy, (very Simpsons Town Hall) but as an avid commuter cyclist in FG for over 15 years, I think there were two takeaways:

    1. Rather than a meeting about citibikes, it became another identity-based fight about underlying NYC changes, such as the whitening of Fort Greene/Clinton Hill through gentrification, and the age changes. Seniors really do need easy access to ramps (and they won’t be biking!) and putting a CITI station in front of the elderly home was a royal eff-up by the DOT. The bro who compared segregation of bikers to segregation based on race was an utter fail; these are people who lived through civil rights movements and while we “bikers” deserve our rights, it is laughable to think that these are of equal fights.

    2. The non-biking public is woefully underinformed about how much laws already exist for us; there were many complaints about “them following the law” and “why don’t they put these on the sidewalk, or in a park, where it belongs?” These people don’t know that we get totally ticketed all the time for running reds (esp with the ferocious cops in the 88th precint, which covers FG/CH) and that biking on sidewalks or in parks is, of course, illegal. God knows I’ve gotten tickets for those.

    If we were able to communicate to these folks – who are really, really liberal and have fought many good fights in the city – that we are on their side against Citi branding, against Bloomberg’s development-friendly policies, that would go a long way to ease this tension. Until that happens, it’ll still be the whole “ignorant drivers vs hipsters” debate that has more pollution than a BQE ride.

  • Cartola

    I went to this too – it was a bit crazy, (very Simpsons Town Hall) but as an avid commuter cyclist in FG for over 15 years, I think there were two takeaways:

    1. Rather than a meeting about citibikes, it became another identity-based fight about underlying NYC changes, such as the whitening of Fort Greene/Clinton Hill through gentrification, and the age changes. Seniors really do need easy access to ramps (and they won’t be biking!) and putting a CITI station in front of the elderly home was a royal eff-up by the DOT. The bro who compared segregation of bikers to segregation based on race was an utter fail; these are people who lived through civil rights movements and while we “bikers” deserve our rights, it is laughable to think that these are of equal fights.

    2. The non-biking public is woefully underinformed about how much laws already exist for us; there were many complaints about “them following the law” and “why don’t they put these on the sidewalk, or in a park, where it belongs?” These people don’t know that we get totally ticketed all the time for running reds (esp with the ferocious cops in the 88th precint, which covers FG/CH) and that biking on sidewalks or in parks is, of course, illegal. God knows I’ve gotten tickets for those.

    If we were able to communicate to these folks – who are really, really liberal and have fought many good fights in the city – that we are on their side against Citi branding, against Bloomberg’s development-friendly policies, that would go a long way to ease this tension. Until that happens, it’ll still be the whole “ignorant drivers vs hipsters” debate that has more pollution than a BQE ride.

  • moocow

    The segregation comment flopped so hard, and that kid was making a good point, had the crowd up to that moment. Then most of the white people laughed him off the pulpit too. I think you are so right that the meeting became about much more than bike sharing stations.

  • Ian Turner

    The community board system was put in place primarily to regulate the whackjobs. Despite its significant shortcomings, it mostly works.

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