Today’s Headlines

  • CB 7 Members Agree: Bike Lane Endorsement Will Happen, Eventually (TransNat)
  • Related: It Sounds Like Steve Cuozzo Is Dying to Get Back on a Bike
  • At Bill-Signing, Pedicab Drivers Convince Bloomberg to Put Down His Pen (CapNY, Post 12)
  • Taxi Apps Will Probably Start With Pilot Program, Says Yassky (NYT, WSJ)
  • Riverdale Press Dissects the Failed Drunk Driving Case Against Kevin Spellman
  • Motorist Flips Car on Residential Street in Carroll Gardens (PMFA)
  • Breaking: Child Wanders Onto NYC Street Unattended, Is Not Killed (Post)
  • Cuomo Names Stop-and-Frisk Reform as a Top Agenda Item for 2013 (WNYC)
  • Peter Vallone Jr. Is Running for Queens Borough President (DNA)
  • Census Data on Transit, Race and Income Show Pretty Much What You’d Expect (TransNat)
  • The Nation Honors Urbanist Pioneer Jane Holtz Kay

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Anonymous

    Everyone should take a moment to read Preston Schiller’s tribute to the late Jane Holtz Kay in The Nation (last headline). Jane was a true pioneer of, for and in the livable streets movement, and Preston’s eulogy does her proud.

  • That might be one of Cuozzo’s best. Do all of his readers live in suburban Long Island or New Jersey? When you look at polling statistics those are the only places that agree with his nonsense. 

  • Postal

    “When asked simply whether the bike lanes were a good idea or a bad idea, 66 percent of New Yorkers said they were a good idea…Twenty-seven percent of residents called the lanes a bad idea.”

    http://www.nytimes.com/2012/08/22/nyregion/most-new-yorkers-say-bike-lanes-are-a-good-idea.html?_r=0

    Now we know. Only 27% of New Yorkers read the Post.

  • Anonymous

    I encourage you all to post a comment under the Cuozzo piece on the Post’s site.  It’s the trenches of an ugly war, but it matters at least somewhat.

  • Daphna

    I am so glad Bloomberg did not sign the new city council law aimed at pedicab fares into law.  I hope all pedicab drivers and owners contact Bloomberg with more reasons against this law during this period of time that Bloomberg is taking to think about it.

  • Anonymous

    Question for the livable streets hive mind.  I just sent the following note to NYCDOT via their “contact DOT’ webpage.  Any readers here have any insights?

    “I’m very tempted to request a Lead Pedestrian Interval for the north crossing of 1st Avenue at E. 14th Street in Manhattan, but I want to know first whether DOT *knows* whether LPIs actually reliably make pedestrians safer.  My fear is that after waiting for LPIs, drivers may drive even more aggressively once they finally get a green signal.  I worry that this might make things even more dangerous for pedestrians in the crosswalk than if the pedestrians did *not* have an LPI.  Does DOT have any information that addresses this question?”

  • Joe R.

    @ddartley:disqus I found this study which suggesting LPIs reduce pedestrian-motor vehicle collisions by a statistically significant amount: http://pustaka.pu.go.id/files/pdf/BALITBANG-03-C000114-17013001200221231-safety_effectiveness.pdf

    However, the study was conducted was based on a handful of intersections in the borough of State College, PA. As such, I would take the results with a huge grain of salt applying them to NYC. I honestly think in NYC given the ridiculous number of traffic signals that anything which causes motorists to stop for even longer is going to make things worse. Used sparingly and in a proper context, various traffic controls can work very well. Start overusing them, or using them improperly, and they’ll be increasingly less effective. NYC is already grossly overusing traffic lights/stop signs, and also misusing them as traffic calming devices. LPI might only work in the context where traffic signals are generally respected. As we both know, that’s not the case in NYC. Motorists regularly floor it on yellows, feel entitled to run red lights a few seconds after they’ve changed, and often jump on lights which are about to turn green.

  • Driver

    ddartley, it is funny that you mention that crossing, as it is one that illustrates how little regard for safe crossing many pedestrians have.  As it is now, pedestrians create their own LPI by playing chicken with the left turning traffic from 14th St. The north crossing of 1st ave at 14th st has a delayed don’t walk signal because there is a green left turn arrow from 14th st onto 1st Ave at the beginning of the green light cycle.  Just as at other similar intersections with a left turn arrow at the beginning of the cycle, this is completely ignored by pedestrians who proceed in masses against the don’t walk light as soon as the traffic on 1st ave stops for the red, and play chicken with vehicles attempting to turn from 14th St with the green arrow.  It’s either try to force your way through or get stuck blocking the intersection because the pedestrians don’t want to acknowledge the right of way of the green arrow.
    This situation is not dissimilar from jaywalkers crossing in the crosswalk against the light forcing drivers to a stop in an intersection at a green light, which prompts other jaywalkers to proceed, leaving the vehicle stuck in the intersection or crosswalk. 
    I’m all for yielding to pedestrians (and cyclists) and giving them some courtesy and respect on the road, even if they don’t necessarily have the right of way, but not when it leaves me stuck in a bad situation, ie blocking the intersection or crosswalk. 

  • Driver

    ddartley, it is funny that you mention that crossing, as it is one that illustrates how little regard for safe crossing many pedestrians have.  As it is now, pedestrians create their own LPI by playing chicken with the left turning traffic from 14th St. The north crossing of 1st ave at 14th st has a delayed don’t walk signal because there is a green left turn arrow from 14th st onto 1st Ave at the beginning of the green light cycle.  Just as at other similar intersections with a left turn arrow at the beginning of the cycle, this is completely ignored by pedestrians who proceed in masses against the don’t walk light as soon as the traffic on 1st ave stops for the red, and play chicken with vehicles attempting to turn from 14th St with the green arrow.  It’s either try to force your way through or get stuck blocking the intersection because the pedestrians don’t want to acknowledge the right of way of the green arrow.
    This situation is not dissimilar from jaywalkers crossing in the crosswalk against the light forcing drivers to a stop in an intersection at a green light, which prompts other jaywalkers to proceed, leaving the vehicle stuck in the intersection or crosswalk. 
    I’m all for yielding to pedestrians (and cyclists) and giving them some courtesy and respect on the road, even if they don’t necessarily have the right of way, but not when it leaves me stuck in a bad situation, ie blocking the intersection or crosswalk.