Today’s Headlines

  • Chenugor Dao, 60, Killed on Bklyn Sidewalk After Driver Flips; “No Criminality” (DNANY1, Post 12)
  • Cyclist Ramon Russel, 37, Killed by Tractor-Trailer Truck Driver at Aqueduct; No Charges (Post, News)
  • TZB Transit Task Force Announced, Minus the MTA (Times Union); Too Little, Too Late? (LoHud)
  • After Crash Killed 15 Passengers, Casino Bus Driver Found Not Guilty (NY1, News, TransNat, Post 1, 2)
  • Involved in a Hit-and-Run With an Unmarked Law Enforcement Vehicle? Good Luck (Gothamist)
  • MTA Tweaks Fare Hike Proposal to Extend Pay-Per-Ride MetroCard Discount (News)
  • NBBL’s Norm Steisel Is Gotham Gazette’s Go-To Expert on Bike-Share
  • NYC School Buses Involved in 1,700 Crashes Causing 900 Injuries in 2011-2012 School Year (DNA)
  • Bloomberg Calls Jaywalking Crackdown a “Great Idea” But Also Impractical (Observer)
  • Winners of $250,000 in City Grants for BIDs Include Livable Streets Projects (NewsCrain’s)
  • Platform Screen Doors on the Subway? Don’t Count On It (CapNY)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • J. Mork

    If the mayor wants something different than jaywalking, he needs to change the status quo of traffic laws designed to 
    speed up motor vehicles while slowing down pedestrians and cyclists. Of course people are bgoing to rebel against that injustice.

  • Jabir

    Sounds like Neighbors for Better Bike Share wants the whole process to start over from scratch.

  • 9 PPW

    Neighbors for Better Bike Share.

    You can be sure Norman is actively rooting for this to fail. Every Alta delay is a big coup for NBBL and brings us perilously closer to no bike share at all. DOT needs to up its game. Alta even more so.

  • Streetsman

    Regarding platform screen doors, I think the MTA at this point should feel obligated to one day provide them – they can’t keep letting hundreds of people a year get hit by trains in the tracks and not do anything. I know it is a high-price item but they need to start planning now. Research the products, get an estimate, and project a timetable for rollout. Even if it would take 50 years to hit all 496 stations, you have to get the ball rolling. Take the list of all the stations in the system and prioritize the implementation at the stations that have seen the highest rate of injuries, the stations that carry the most trains and the most passengers, and the stations with rehab projects already in the pipeline or the stations where it is cheapest/easiest due to site conditions (i.e. all the “low-hanging fruit”), and then work your way out from there. In 20 years you could have accident-free, track-fire-free, climate-controlled platforms in most of the CBD, and that would make a HUGE difference for the vast majority of straphangers.

  • Guest

    Accident at 15th/10th – it looks like the Chelsea Market and the building across the street both have cameras that may have captured something.  The victim’s lawyer should try to get a copy of the tapes before they’re no longer available.  You can bet the NYPD won’t do it!

  • Anonymous

    where are we supposed to throw our trash if there are screen doors on the platform?

  • Larry Littlefield

    “Regarding platform screen doors, I think the MTA at this point should feel obligated to one day provide them.”

    The TWU would never allow this, as it would make conductors less necessary.  Why do you think every car class has the doors in a different position?  Has that changed since the R-142s?  I’d like to think so, but would not be surprised if that wasn’t the cash.

    IMHO although there would be the usual screams about favoring Manhattan, platform doors are really only needed in crowded stations, and those that are curved.  They wouldn’t really work on elevated platforms in any event.

  • Mike

    Why on earth wouldn’t platform doors work on elevated platforms?  They work great in Singapore.  (They don’t go up all the way to the ceiling — because elevated platforms there aren’t air-conditioned — but are about 5′ tall.)

  • Larry Littlefield

    More exposure to the elements, and more vandalism unless then took up a significant amount of space on the platform so they couldn’t be kicked over.

  • The tractor-trailer driver killed Ramon Russel in the Aqueduct *parking lot*. Seriously: What will the bike-blamers come up for with this one? “We all know parking lots are for cars”?

  • Streetsman

    I wouldn’t want to get too hung up on the details so soon, I just think a concept needs to get floated – rough cost and schedule, maybe a sketch or something and some alarming statistics, eg:

    “In the next 20 years, 500 people will die in New York’s subway tracks unless something is done to prevent it. In those 20 years, we could cut that number in half, prevent delays due to track fires, and bring climate-controlled platforms to 43 of the system’s busiest stations at a cost of $800 million.”

    Just guessing on all those numbers but the time has come for a study and a proposal that we can all seriously consider.

  • Charles_Siegel

    “Regarding platform screen doors, I think the MTA at this point should feel obligated to one day provide them.”

    In Paris, they are gradually adding platform doors on some Metro lines and are beginning to run them with no drivers – fully automated, like trains at airports – during some times of the day.  They are planning to gradually convert the entire metro to fully automated operation.

    If they can do that despite the French unions, we should be able to do something similar with our much weaker unions. 

  • Joe R.

    If the mayor feels ticketing for jaywalking is impractical, and people wouldn’t stand for it in any case (I happen to agree on both counts), then why not change the laws so crosswalks and signals are suggestions only? And do likewise for any type of human-powered vehicle. After all, a law which is never enforced (and not practical to enforce) makes little sense. Laws and infrastructure which seriously slow down pedestrians and cyclists just to speed up cars make no sense. Besides that, these laws will be largely ignored anyway.

  • Joe R.

    If the mayor feels ticketing for jaywalking is impractical, and people wouldn’t stand for it in any case (I happen to agree on both counts), then why not change the laws so crosswalks and signals are suggestions only? And do likewise for any type of human-powered vehicle. After all, a law which is never enforced (and not practical to enforce) makes little sense. Laws and infrastructure which seriously slow down pedestrians and cyclists just to speed up cars make no sense. Besides that, these laws will be largely ignored anyway.

  • Joe R.

    If the mayor feels ticketing for jaywalking is impractical, and people wouldn’t stand for it in any case (I happen to agree on both counts), then why not change the laws so crosswalks and signals are suggestions only? And do likewise for any type of human-powered vehicle. After all, a law which is never enforced (and not practical to enforce) makes little sense. Laws and infrastructure which seriously slow down pedestrians and cyclists just to speed up cars make no sense. Besides that, these laws will be largely ignored anyway.

  • Joe R.

    If the mayor feels ticketing for jaywalking is impractical, and people wouldn’t stand for it in any case (I happen to agree on both counts), then why not change the laws so crosswalks and signals are suggestions only? And do likewise for any type of human-powered vehicle. After all, a law which is never enforced (and not practical to enforce) makes little sense. Laws and infrastructure which seriously slow down pedestrians and cyclists just to speed up cars make no sense. Besides that, these laws will be largely ignored anyway.

  • Joe R.

    If the mayor feels ticketing for jaywalking is impractical, and people wouldn’t stand for it in any case (I happen to agree on both counts), then why not change the laws so crosswalks and signals are suggestions only? And do likewise for any type of human-powered vehicle. After all, a law which is never enforced (and not practical to enforce) makes little sense. Laws and infrastructure which seriously slow down pedestrians and cyclists just to speed up cars make no sense. Besides that, these laws will be largely ignored anyway.

  • Joe R.

    If the mayor feels ticketing for jaywalking is impractical, and people wouldn’t stand for it in any case (I happen to agree on both counts), then why not change the laws so crosswalks and signals are suggestions only? And do likewise for any type of human-powered vehicle. After all, a law which is never enforced (and not practical to enforce) makes little sense. Laws and infrastructure which seriously slow down pedestrians and cyclists just to speed up cars make no sense. Besides that, these laws will be largely ignored anyway.

  • Joe R.

    Regarding platform doors, they’re not even remotely practical to retrofit in NYC’s subway system. You have the differing door location on trains for one thing. And then you need to stop very precisely to line up the doors, which will increase running time (and hence decrease line capacity). It’s likely the doors would suffer mechanical failure frequently, delaying trains. The doors also would impede station ventilation because the trains coming in and out of the station help move air. Platform doors are one of those things with a very poor cost/benefit ratio. I don’t mean to sound callous, but the vast majority of people killed on the tracks aren’t pushed, but rather go there of their own free will to retrieve items, or for other reasons. It’s tragic that people die, but a little education (and enforcement) would stop the majority of people from dying on subway tracks. Besides all that, the money to install platform doors (and air condition some stations) just doesn’t exist. The cost would likely run into the tens of billions, if not more. Platform doors are one of those things which are far easier to design into a brand new system than to retrofit into an older one. About the only thing NYC could potentially install would be some kind of motion sensor to alert train operations if someone is on the tracks ahead. It would need to be designed so rats can’t accidentally trigger it, but this might be a cost effective to save lives.

  • Thomas040

    I don’t understand all these car incited deaths not leading to any charges of manslaughter? Isn’t that what manslaughter is, unintentionally killing someone?

  • Pacabn

    Manslaughter definition. Intend to cause physical injury and cause death. Big word here is INTEND. There is a provision to recklessly cause the death of a person, but speeding ect has not been determined by the courts to be reckless at this time. Vehicular manslaughter you need a DWI Charge.  

  • Larry Littlefield

    “Platform doors are one of those things with a very poor cost/benefit ratio.”
    I agree, in general.  But if you look at it station by station, perhaps they would make sense in the most crowded stations.  Some time after the MTA stopped putting doors in different positions in different car classes.

    “If they can do that despite the French unions, we should be able to do something similar with our much weaker unions.”

    In France, it is assumed that the government needs to deliver services to ordinary people.  Neither the unions nor the anti-tax right wing are constrained by that assumption here.

  • > Manslaughter definition. Intend to cause physical injury and cause death.

    This is neither the definition nor the law. The definition is this: “The crime of killing a human being without malice aforethought, or otherwise in circumstances not amounting to murder.”

    Under the law in our state manslaughter is divided into first and second degree, which is where intent comes in. First-degree manslaughter requires intent while second-degree manslaughter applies to someone who “recklessly causes the death of another person”. Being a category made up of both degrees, manslaughter does not require intent and is satisfied by negligence.

    So Thomas’s question remains. Why won’t our police, prosecutors, and courts enforce the law against antisocial behaviors that kill so many people?

  • Pacabn

    Speeding alone has not been decided by the courts to be negligent either. Why do you think Cy Vance and company dont charge these cases? They cant win them so dont charge them. It would ruin their conviction rate.

  • Anonymous

    Re: collision at 15th and 10th:

    This intersection is on my cycling route home — just two blocks from the office — and it has to be treated with a lot of respect.

    I don’t see many cars going north on tenth that run the light, apart from the usual trying-to-beat-the-red-light bs. The main trouble is traffic tends to back up at the light, but taking the one lane here isn’t a realistic option, so you end up filtering forward. I try to do this on the left, but sometimes there aren’t gaps on that side; in either case, it requires lots of caution and deference.

    To top it off, the pavement is super-craptacular on the block leading up to the light. Several officemates and I put in 311 requests to repave, and they did as far west as 9th, but further than that is waiting on the former gas station at the corner of 10th to be redeveloped.

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