Today’s Headlines

  • Cuomo Calls for Lopez Resignation; Prior Harassment Claims Quieted by Shelly Silver (NYT 1, 2)
  • Jason Tavarez Struck and Killed in Longwood; Driver Charged With Manslaughter, DWI (DNA)
  • Unnamed Pedestrians Killed Trying to Cross Grand Central Parkway (DNA) and FDR (Post)
  • Advance: Dedicated Lanes for Hylan Boulevard Select Bus Are a Symbol of Unfair Transpo Policy
  • City Council Bill Would Require NYPD to Report Fare-Beating Stats (Advance)
  • Passengers Stranded for Hours When Computer Malfunction Stalls JFK Trains (NYT)
  • Ian Dutton to Propose Separated Bergen Street Bike Lane to Community Boards (Bklyn Paper)
  • Gravel Surface and Speed Bumps Keep Cyclists Off Brooklyn Bridge Park Bike Path (Post)
  • Shocker: Inwood Restaurant’s Promise of Convenient Parking Draws More Traffic to Dyckman (DNA)
  • Bronx SUV Driver Rams Shoe Store on Jerome Avenue, Injuring 12 (Gothamist)
  • Autonomous Van Crashes Into Building Scaffolding in Hell’s Kitchen (DNA)
  • NYPD Sergeant Damages Car of Fellow Cop; Criminality Suspected (News)
  • Louisiana Surgeon En Route to Operating Room Bypasses Gridlock on Kid’s Bike (HuffPo)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • fj

    I use the Brooklyn Brigde bike path virtually everyday; even for attitude adjustment

  • Larry Littlefield

    As of today I’m car free for the first time in 21 years and child-free for the first time in 20.  Or rather semi-car free:  I’m still paying for it but it is in its natural habitat — rural upstate New York.

    So today was alternate side, and I didn’t have to care.

  • Reader

    A woman was hit and killed by a truck driver this morning at 6th and Carmine. Really awful scene down there – tons of police and emergency vehicles.

  • David

    I’m glad I’m not the only one that was puzzled by the Brooklyn Bridge park bike path design. I wrote a nice email to the Brooklyn Greenway people

  • Bolwerk
  • Bolwerk

    The Advance seems implicitly convinced that motorists have a really low intelligence.  But let’s see if they follow up on this:

    Even when all the pavement is painted, the cameras are up and Con Edison
    has moved on, banning all vehicles but buses in one lane of Hylan
    Boulevard means that the carrying capacity of that major artery will be
    reduced by a third during rush hour. And we all know what Hylan
    Boulevard is like during rush hour as it is.

    The capacity being reduced, of course, could mean a better traffic equilibrium, as happened with Broadway.

    I seem to remember some commenter on another blog claiming the same would happen thanks to the  Broadway pedestrian plazas. It didn’t, of course. When this was pointed out to him months after the fact, he claimed that the traffic must have moved from Broadway to Ninth Ave. or Eleventh Ave. since there was little or no discernible change on nearer downtown-bound avenues.

  • car free nation

    You go Larry!

  • Anonymous

    I too have written to BBP and complained about the bike path there. It would be a shame if they insist on building out the rest of the path the same way.

  • Anonymous

    http://gothamist.com/2012/08/27/woman_killed_by_flatbed_truck_in_gr.php
    Ugh, so sad.  Another person run over, this time by a truck.  6th ave and Houston.  Any one who knows that area knows that cars fly up 6th ave like it’s the West Side Highway.

    And yet so many elected pols & newspaper editorials want to rail on about bikes, bike lanes, bike share, speeding spandex cyclists.  If a cyclist is riding recklessly, give them a ticket.  That’s all we need to say about that.  Period.  But yet, we just accept people getting run over by cars and trucks.  As if that’s just part of the bargain.  It makes me so angry every time someone is killed like this.  It could’ve been me. 

  • Station44025

    No kidding about BB Park lane, on both my road bike and my folder it is completely treacherous. How does making the bike lane difficult to ride encouraging its use? This is a result of the whole bikes are too fast and dangerous and need to be obstructed mentality that produces the exact opposite of the intended results.

  • Anonymous


    An NYPD spokeswoman says that the woman was on a scooter, “crossing east to west on Houston Street” when the tractor trailer traveling northbound struck her with its rear wheel at 6th Avenue. The spokeswoman confirmed that the victim, who is believed to be in her late 50s, was dragged for two blocks until the truck stopped near Carmine Street. There is no criminality suspected, but the investigation is ongoing

    So if she was crossing East to West on Houston (on a scooter) and caught by the rear tires of the north bound truck on 6th ave. . . then?  That doesn’t really make sense?  Was she late crossing the light?  But then she would’ve been hit by the front of the truck?

    I think more likely is that she was turning right/north on to 6th ave and the truck took off and didn’t see her?  Regardless, it’s a terrible tragedy and sounds absolutely awful the way she went 🙁 I hope it was quick and painless . . . .so sad.  

  • BBP rider and runner

    One of the problems not mentioned in the Post article is that because of the cobblestone speed bumps in BBP, those cyclists who don’t go out to the street and stay on the path often ride on the wrong side.  If you’re on thin tires, going slowly, or carrying a kid, you just don’t want to ride over those things and risk falling.  So, the effort to reduce conflicts has, in a way, created more.  Sometimes we overengineer ourselves past the point of usefulness.

  • Albert

    Regarding Advance: Dedicated Lanes for Hylan Boulevard Select Bus Are a Symbol of Unfair Transpo Policy…

    Couldn’t help but notice the following quote, and its striking real-world demonstration of how & why some traffic really *can*
    “just disappear” when some driving-enabling amenities are walked back:

    “One frustrated commuter reported it took her an hour to get from Tysens Lane to Midland Avenue and she wound up being late for work…adding, ‘I probably won’t take Hylan Boulevard ever again.'”

    Good for her to leave more room for mass transit.

  • Len

    The piece on the NYPD sergeant who keyed her boyfriends car is related to your mission statement how?
    Streetsblog is a daily news source connecting people to information about sustainable transportation and livable communities.

  • Joe R.

    @c29b3a08e21a588281953551f859e767:disqus I think the point of linking to that article is to show that someone will be charged with criminality just for keying someone’s car, but if they instead actually kill or injure a person with a car, then it is usually “no criminality suspected”.

  • Joe R.

    I have to say that the city is shooting itself in the foot if it’s going to simultaneously say cycling is good, but at the same time install all kinds of measures to “slow bikes down”. Maybe on a real mixed use path this might marginally make sense. Even then it really doesn’t because the goal should only be to slow down cyclists when lots of peds are around, not all the time. The very reason bicycles exist is to allow a person to move farther and faster under their own power. If anything, we should be building infrastructure which plays to that and allows all classes of riders to proceed to their full capabilities. If bikes are really “too fast” in a given location, then build a separate path for them where they won’t be too fast. Intentionally slowing bikes down to a fast jog, or even worse, walking speed, makes them less practical than just walking. Infrastructure for human-powered vehicles should mostly be designed with both their present and potential future capabilities in mind. That means designing for 25-30 mph now if we’re only thinking of “normal” bicycles, and perhaps 50+ mph if we want to include velomobiles in the future. Start thinking of bike paths as potential rapid transit arteries, then design accordingly.

  • Larry Littlefield

    The Atlantic recounts the diminished driving and homeownership rates among broke younger generations.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2012/09/the-cheapest-generation/309060/

  • Anonymous

    Today there were NYPD signs in Central Park saying “bicyclists must obey all traffic laws” or something like that.

    I wonder when they’ll post signs saying that cops must obey all traffic laws…

  • Anonymous

    Maybe for tomorrow’s headlines: http://www.daylife.com/photo/015C9HifSXgSj?__site=daylife

    Looks like law enforcement officers are adopting bikes in some places 🙂  Oh the irony for our 2004 RNC veterans.

  • Anonymous

    @45589687e8df260df565d048dab64df2:disqus  The woman you quoted isn’t going to stop commuting by car because of the SBS lane on Hylan Boulevard, she’s just going to take a different route to work.  So the traffic isn’t disappearing, it’s just going somewhere else.  Real change would be if she took the bus instead, but, it being Staten Island, that seems like a pipe dream.

    @f9b2cb395abd5a101456b3b0a40912e1:disqus I can’t say I’m a huge fan of the “Cheapest Generation” moniker used in that Atlantic article (ignoring for the moment that I’m never sure whether I fall within GenX or GenY and just throwing in my lot with Y for the time being).  “Cheap” implies “stingy” which implies that these are spending decisions made by choice.  The article acknowledges (though buries) that “Nine out of 10 Millennials say they eventually want a place they own, according to a recent Fannie Mae survey.”  We want to buy homes, it’s just that the type of homes we want are far outside our price range.  For the price that my sister and brother-in-law are paying for a three-bedroom house in Maplewood, NJ, (and grudgingly moving because they can’t afford to buy in Hoboken), you can’t get a two-bedroom apartment anywhere in Manhattan or in the most desirable parts of Brooklyn or Queens (that being the smallest that’s a realistic goal for couples who want to have kids).  In other words, we’re not buying homes because the homes available for sale are either too far away (plenty of affordable real estate in Sussex County, I’m sure) or unaffordable to most.

    The thing about cars is a wholly separate issue.  I think it’s an oversimplification to say that “Millennials don’t want cars;” “Millennials don’t put as high a priority on cars” seems much more realistic.  As it is, my fiancee and I are pretty cash-strapped paying off my law school loans plus our living expenses in Cobble Hill, and while we’d like to also own a car for visits to our folks out in the ‘burbs or weekend trips, the reality of the situation is that, where the article says “[t]he typical new car costs $30,000 and sits in a garage or parking spot for 23 hours a day,” if we had a car it’d sit on the street 24 hours a typical day, other than being moved for street cleaning, and then on the weekends it’d see significantly more use (a combination of the trips mentioned above and trips that might otherwise be subway trips except that we’d feel compelled to use the car in order to justify the cost of owning it), but the vast majority of the time it’d be a big money pit.  I think equating the two is misleading, overall, though.

    (This is all sort of skewed by the fact that the discussion and this community are focused on urban environments and NYC in particular; there are millions of millennials out there in Florida and Minnesota and Southern California and Texas who are every bit as auto-dependent as our suburban Boomer parents.) 

  • fj

    It seems that they are finally removing a lot of the cobble stone crosswalks on the West Side Bike Path — I know at least one skater who got seriously hurt on them — so it’s quite possible that BBP will take the hint.

    In any case, despite the gravel and cobble stones, and usually the longer way to anywhere, it’s the consummate scenic route and respite from the constant dangers of cars.

  • fj

    Actually, Brooklyn Bridge Park including the bike path is a hugely exciting area with currently a magnificent work-in-progress pedestrian crossway from the Heights Esplanade.  This is a high use area and there have been extensive exhibits and events, a pop up beach and pool, free kayaking, a rooftop public bar restaurant next to the Governor’s Island Ferry, past a beach style volley ball  court, a sustainable education center, the East River Ferry . . .

    And, yes, it is way too easy go too fast on the path which I’ve done in wee hours when no one is around . . . so maybe the speed moderating aspect of  the path probably is a good idea with the heavy density of people who use and seem to enjoy the area quite a lot adding a tremendous dimension to the pleasures of the route not unlike those of the one over the Brooklyn Bridge.

  • In order for the stopped clock of the Post to report correctly on a livable streets story we had to wait for them to stumble upon a bicycle path that actually is stupid, and the Brooklyn Bridge Park’s maniacal surfacing puts it in this category. The loose gravel is more than enough to slow cyclists down, if speed would have even been a problem in a park of this size. But our intrepid park designers had to go further.

    They had to add the screw-you stones. If I ever believed that intelligent government in NYC was possible, these stone lines embedded *halfway* across the park path extinguished my hope. Why not go the whole way? Did they run out of stones? Too scary for walking? Pedestrians do not care about stones. They are not balancing on a tiny seat. By going only half way across the path, the city guaranteed that cyclists would ride around these silly obstacles—on the “wrong side”, which is wrong, and bad, and wrong.

    Who would choose to ride over a stupid half-assed line of stones that some bureaucrat put in your way entirely to make you uncomfortable? No one would chose to do this, and no one does. Go look at that path, or any other path used by humans or other animals. We walk, ride, run, and swim around obstacles. We won’t endure pointless discomfort just because some remote idiot armed with powerpoint thinks we should.

  • moocow

    I feel like lately on the BBP path there are more peds in the bike lane than in the foot path. So I suffer the stupid bumps, and people with strollers looking at photos hung on the Promenade side.
    I cynically thing that people who walk in bike lanes and jaywalk are the ones complaining about the scofflaw cyclists.

  • moocow

    I feel like lately on the BBP path there are more peds in the bike lane than in the foot path. So I suffer the stupid bumps, and people with strollers looking at photos hung on the Promenade side.
    I cynically thing that people who walk in bike lanes and jaywalk are the ones complaining about the scofflaw cyclists.

  • moocow

    I feel like lately on the BBP path there are more peds in the bike lane than in the foot path. So I suffer the stupid bumps, and people with strollers looking at photos hung on the Promenade side.
    I cynically thing that people who walk in bike lanes and jaywalk are the ones complaining about the scofflaw cyclists.

  • moocow

    I feel like lately on the BBP path there are more peds in the bike lane than in the foot path. So I suffer the stupid bumps, and people with strollers looking at photos hung on the Promenade side.
    I cynically thing that people who walk in bike lanes and jaywalk are the ones complaining about the scofflaw cyclists.

  • moocow

    I feel like lately on the BBP path there are more peds in the bike lane than in the foot path. So I suffer the stupid bumps, and people with strollers looking at photos hung on the Promenade side.
    I cynically thing that people who walk in bike lanes and jaywalk are the ones complaining about the scofflaw cyclists.

  • moocow

    I feel like lately on the BBP path there are more peds in the bike lane than in the foot path. So I suffer the stupid bumps, and people with strollers looking at photos hung on the Promenade side.
    I cynically thing that people who walk in bike lanes and jaywalk are the ones complaining about the scofflaw cyclists.

  • moocow

    I feel like lately on the BBP path there are more peds in the bike lane than in the foot path. So I suffer the stupid bumps, and people with strollers looking at photos hung on the Promenade side.
    I cynically thing that people who walk in bike lanes and jaywalk are the ones complaining about the scofflaw cyclists.

  • moocow

    I feel like lately on the BBP path there are more peds in the bike lane than in the foot path. So I suffer the stupid bumps, and people with strollers looking at photos hung on the Promenade side.
    I cynically thing that people who walk in bike lanes and jaywalk are the ones complaining about the scofflaw cyclists.

  • fj

    Most of the pedestrians don’t care if cyclists stay in the bike lane or not since plenty walk in the bike lane and where the cobble stones are I just avoid them by going in pedestrian lane. 

    Quite fun to read these petty goofy comments.

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