Today’s Headlines

  • Construction on Permanent Times Square Redesign Begins This Spring (DNAinfo)
  • Cuomo Grants Two-Year Reprieve on State Charge For MTA Borrowing (Advance)
  • Wrong-Way, Hit-And-Run Driver Pleads Guilty to Criminally Negligent Homicide (QChron)
  • Op-Ed: Tappan Zee Transit Key to Reinventing Hudson Valley, Halting Suburban Decline (Newsday)
  • Coming Soon: Real Time Subway Data (2nd Ave Sagas)
  • Queens Highway Crash Injures Eight, Including Three Children (DNAinfo)
  • Driver Flees Scene After Striking Prospect Heights Two-Year-Old (Patch)
  • Black Car Drivers Vote to Unionize in First Round of Major Campaign (Crain’s)
  • Ed Towns and Wife Gwen Will Miss Campaign-Funded Personal Cars (News)
  • Updated Scorecard Provides Standard For Measuring BRT Quality (Transpo Nation)
  • Apparently, Cyclists Are All That Stand Between Piermont, NY and Perfection (NYT)
  • Here’s One Way to Get Local Support For Metered Parking (DNAinfo)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • Larry Littlefield

    That Newsday piece is brilliant, a must read.  It echos what I wrote here. 

    http://www.r8ny.com/blog/larry_littlefield/generation_greed_wants_to_use_up_the_future_and_dictate_it_too.html

    They get it.  The understand the way things are going.  A far larger share of younger generations don’t want an auto-dependent lifestyle, and more than that, they can’t afford it.  They are seeking to find a way to live better with less, and finding it elsewhere.

    Or not — because the shift in social preferences has made the remaining economically viable older cities absurdly expensive.  Such places are in short supply, while traditional suburbs are in excess supply.  My own kids would probably like to live in our neighborhood, but may not be able to afford it.  The question is, can parts of Long Island and the Hudson Valley be transformed into the kind of places they want to live. 

  • Anonymous

    I want to echo what Larry Littlefield just said: the Newsday op-ed is indeed brilliant. Yes, a must-read.

  • Pete

    The Brooklyn Paper and Park Slope Patch have both been silent on this one – anyone have any additional info? 
    Police Blotter – Enraged driver pummels cyclisthttp://brooklynpaper.com/stories/35/18/ps_78blotter_2012_05_04_bk.html

  • Pete
  • Larry Littlefield

    I want to congratulate Mr. Komanoff and his fellow travelers who have been at this a long time.  Defeated in the past, you have won the future by the long game of birth, death and education.

  • Mitch

    “The bicyclists often pay little heed to the designated bike lanes,” said Robert Samuels, a former journalist and author who has lived here since 1982….“They talk loudly and shout back and forth to one another, often waking me out of a sound sleep on a Sunday morning”
    I probably ride through there twice a week, and I’ve never seen a bike lane. Just mid-ride cyclists, quietly drinking coffee and injecting cash into the local economy.

  • 9W Rider

    @5910db1415fda3cef1e922d5accd4f47:disqus You’ve never seen one because there are no bike lanes through the main stretch of Piermont. It’s amazing that the Times can’t be bothered to check Google maps when someone makes a claim like that. What happened to basic fact checking?

  • Pete
  • carma

    i own 2 cars and i am with the boat that i dont want to be tied to an automobile to be able to live in society.

    i find it dreadful to do a morning commute by being stuck in traffic in a car even though there are certainly are days i wish i was in an enclosed shell away from the elements.

  • carma

    @e6c6b10fb9defc8425213d60a7fc2f3d:disqus 
    brilliant piece there.  

    the scary part is that many texting while driving people still out there.  and they are absolutely moronic.

  • Anonymous

    “[T]he shift in social preferences has made the remaining economically
    viable older cities absurdly expensive.  Such places are in short
    supply, while traditional suburbs are in excess supply.  My own kids
    would probably like to live in our neighborhood, but may not be able to
    afford it.  The question is, can parts of Long Island and the Hudson
    Valley be transformed into the kind of places they want to live.”

    This nicely echoes what my sister and brother-in-law (who live in Hoboken) are going through right now.  They have a baby on the way in a few months, and have looked for reasonably-priced ways to stay in Hoboken while moving up from their current 1-bedroom rental to a 2-bed so there’s a separate room for the baby (ideally with reserved parking so our mother, who lives in the suburbs, can drive to Hoboken and help out with child care once my sister goes back to work, without having to hunt for street parking every day).  They both love living in a walkable community like Hoboken, and since they both work in the city and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future it’s ideal from a commuting standpoint as well, but there’s so much demand for housing there that they were looking at as much as a 50% increase in their rent, with properties for sale being basically out of the question.  As a result, they’ve found themselves looking in North Jersey suburbs with walkable downtowns and convenient access to the city via NJ Transit, but even towns like those (or, at least, the ones like South Orange and Montclair that don’t really need to be “transformed” in the way Larry mentions above) are often prohibitively expensive, at least in the areas immediately around NJT stations.  The city?  So expensive it’s not even worth looking at.  It’s a preview of what my fiancee and I are going to have to deal with in another couple of years, and it’s not all that encouraging.

  • Larry Littlefield

    It’s not a good situation Josh.  People may have to leave the NY Metro altogether if the bubble doesn’t deflate.  We considered doing so during the 1980s housing bubble, but we had some personal circumstances that tied us here for a while and then the bubble deflated.  People talk as if high housing prices are a good thing, but they’ll kill the economy, and lower costs for those who got deals in the past — via rent regulation for example — won’t help in the future.

    Many older cities are still buried by costs from the past, debts and pensions, and have high taxes and bad schools.  Plus, in some cases, crime.  But everywhere I write about they are receiving influxes relative to suburbs, despite the disadvantages.  You even have that influx in places like Tulsa and Oklahoma City.  Ultimately, the market will just have to create more places like Hoboken to meet the demand.  And creating such places will ultimately create more jobs than merely re-occupying the previous generation’s housing.

  • JamesR

    Elsa Brenner’s NYT piece on Piermont is infuriating. There are no bike lanes anywhere on the stretch in Piermont where cyclists commonly ride. I know this because I do the ride up  to to Piermont and Nyack several times a month. This is not the first Brenner piece with a blatant factual inaccuracy in it and the woman’s hackish, phoned-in writing is beneath the standard set by the Times. 

  • Anon

    Regarding the Newsday piece – right on the money. About time someone called out Cuomo for his car guy-fueled myopia on transit. I work in local government for one of the communities relatively close to the bridge. The author is so, so right. Many suburban communities are making baby steps in the right direction but I can tell you that there are still a LOT of property owners in these communities that are very much vested in the suburban dream of yards, cars, and garages. Like Larry said, birth, death, and education are the answer, and I’d add demography to this as much of Westchester and some of Rockland are anything but whitebread these days.  

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