That Was Quick

Photo: Jeremy Charette

…and NYC’s first bike corral fills up with a dozen bicycles faster than you can parallel park an Escalade.

  • Louise Lois Steisel

    More evidence Jim Walden can use to show that no one is using bike lanes.  They’re all parked here!

  • NeighborsforBetterBikeParking

    Isn’t it obvious that NYCDOT tipped off radical pro-experimental bike parking lobbyists to the fact that photographers would be in the area?

  • Love it!

  • Anonymous

    my prefab rebuttal for those complaining about losing a parking space is that it’s clear we have gained a dozen.

  • Driver

    Wow those filled up fast.  I’m waiting for the calls to initiate market rate pricing on these spots. 

    I wonder what angle the news will take to speak out against these.  I’m guessing terrorism.  I mean what if twelve extremists filled the frames and tires with explosives?!

    Seriously though, it seems like a good use of the space all around.  One that benefits cyclists, pedestrians, and drivers.

  • Driver

    Wow those filled up fast.  I’m waiting for the calls to initiate market rate pricing on these spots. 

    I wonder what angle the news will take to speak out against these.  I’m guessing terrorism.  I mean what if twelve extremists filled the frames and tires with explosives?!

    Seriously though, it seems like a good use of the space all around.  One that benefits cyclists, pedestrians, and drivers.

  • Joe R.

    Nice idea.  Besides providing much needed bike parking, it also prevents illegal car parking near the corner.  As a result, there are better lines of sight at that intersection which benefits everyone.  Really, everyone wins here.  My only complaint is more personal than with the design, and that’s basically that I don’t really feel comfortable using ANY type of outdoor bike parking.  My brother had 3 bikes stolen in the 1980s while chained outside.  I suppose that thought sticks with me.

  • carma

    as i mentioned in the other post.  this is the best way to make use of space.  it doesnt hurt any drivers looking for parking and at the same time it gives much needed bike parking.

    joe, i agree that its always scary parking your bike and worrying about theft. but somehow having a bunch of bikes together in a concentrated area may be less of an incentive for a thief with boltcutters as the location is probably more visible.

    what would be REALLY cool is if stores have a few storefront bike parking, this way you can actually see your bike when you are in the store.  yes, this takes away from sidewalk pedestrian area, but a bike is not that big.

  • Anonymous

    I love that the bike parking daylights the intersection. Once again adding bicycle infrastructure makes the street safer for all users. Bike share stations should be done this way.

  • carma

    Geck, speaking of bike share.  what the heck is taking so long.  my legs are ready to get on these.  

  • Edward Codsworth

    I’m just waiting for the next accident in this problem intersection. 

    How long till a car smashes through the bike pile?

  • I live about 5 doors up Sackett from here and that has always been a horribly dangerous intersection for peds, drivers and cyclists, especially when a delivery van or SUV parks right on that corner by the stop sign. Last night I asked a friend who has a car and parks in the neighborhood if he was pissed about this and he said “no on the contrary I think it”s a great idea and makes it much safer”. I hope it will be permanent, but something tells me that anti-cycling backlash will win out on this one…

  • > I’m waiting for the calls to initiate market rate pricing on these spots.

    I think the market rate there is still zero; you can always find somewhere to lock up in the area. If you had to pay to use the corral it would be empty most of the time, then New York’s first bicycle corral would be a flop. The boost that businesses on the street can expect to get from having easy, well-known, and free bicycle parking would be lost.

    But Midtown is a different story. After these corrals are established and successful in no-brainer locations like this, I think a priced bicycle parking experiment in Midtown would be really cool. If proper bicycle lanes are ever brought to the area, it will be the only way to manage demand. A few free corrals would be quickly filled by a mix of professional delivery services, residents using it for storage, and visitors who could never count on finding an available spot. When I ride to midtown, this is always a problem.

    So pricing them would be an interesting experiment. Getting the payment system right would be tricky—the charge should be commensurate to what autos pay for the space they require, so it will be very little per hour. People don’t like dealing with coins, and credit cards don’t make sense for such small amounts. But times are changing in the payments business (Square, etc.) so that problem may go away before the city gets around to needing a solution for it. And restaurants could lease a few spots for their exclusive use at a high monthly rate, if they want.

    Bike share is another way of backing into pricing. You are not just paying for the bicycle, but the convenient parking for it. Pretty quickly you are going to have some people using it only for that reason, wondering why they can’t pay less and use their own bicycle.

  • Tyler

    I read an article one (maybe on here?) that said bike thefts are more common on busy streets, in contrast to a quiet residential street, because folks sort of zone out all of the activity. Someone could probably take a diamond blade electric saw to a couple kryptonite locks on Smith Street and no one would even notice.  This, combined with the “bystander effect,” which says the more people around the more likely folks will NOT act… i.e., someone else will.  Long story short, I’m surprised my bike hasn’t been stolen.

  • Eric McClure

    @google-b2011943ccb2736d1d5fe3c2de896553:disqus , it’s permanent, and it’s not going anywhere. It’s not a “trial.”  The bikelash is over.  We’re winning.

  • Fred

    The “bikelash,” better known as those who want all traffic to move efficiently in order to reduce  fuel usage and air pollution, is not over.  It’s the “we’re winning” attitude that creates much of the furor over changes favoring bicycles.  If there was less of this type of attitude, and more traffic law obeying by bicyclists, the rest of us would be much happier with changes such as this.

  • Driver

    “The “bikelash,” better known as those who want all traffic to
    move efficiently in order to reduce  fuel usage and air pollution, is
    not over.”

    The “bikelash” is better known as those who feel more important than everyone else and think all space on the street should belong to them and them alone so they can try to get where they are going as quickly as possible.  The average driver cares nothing about air pollution, and the only concern with reducing fuel usage is to reduce the impact on ones wallet.  You are probably right about one thing though, this awful sense of entitlement and superiority is not over.  

    “If there was less of this type of attitude, and more traffic law obeying
    by bicyclists, the rest of us would be much happier with changes such
    as this.”  If you really believe this, I have a bridge to sell you. 

  • rubber saddle

    Skipped over this whole thread originally.  But Bike the Bronx posted it on Facebook.  Showed the comment “Isn’t it obvious that NYCDOT tipped off radical pro-experimental bike parking lobbyists to the fact that photographers would be in the area?.” So I had to come look.
     
    Great point that the bike parking daylights the intersection.  My one big concern/question: What is the situation in the winter when it snows? Hopefully sanitation doesn’t push the mound here. That might damage the racks. And it might take weeks to clear it off. 

ALSO ON STREETSBLOG

Today’s Headlines

|
Hit-and-Run Garbage Truck Driver Kills Cyclist, 27, on Franklin Street in Greenpoint (Gothamist) Hit-and-Run SUV Driver Kills Alejandro Tello, 18, on Skateboard in Gravesend (News) MTA Bus Driver Kills Kevin Zeng, 25, on Union Turnpike (News) Danielle Davis on How NYPD’s Crash Investigation Compounded the Pain of Her Sister Lauren’s Death (Medium) Subway Delays This […]