What We Learned From the Daily News Bike Lane Debate

Celeste Katz, center, and Alex Nazaryan, right, work their keyboards for today's online chat about bike lanes. Photo: ##http://yfrog.com/kind6xuj##anjalimullany/yfrog##

Earlier today I participated in a live chat debate on the topic of bike lanes, hosted and moderated by Celeste Katz. The chief sparring partner for supporters of bike lanes was Alex Nazaryan, who sits on the paper’s editorial board and joined a group of cyclists for an uneventful ride across the Manhattan Bridge the previous morning.

Number one takeaway: If you have something to say about street safety issues and you want the Daily News opinion team to notice, write a letter to the Daily News. Based on what transpired in the chat room today, the editorial board puts more stock in those letters than other public opinion data or facts about street engineering and transportation policy.

Here’s a compilation of Alex’s points from the debate. In some places I’ve interspersed commentary from other participants and comments that I typed in but did not get posted by the moderator. (You can check out the full transcript, including a lot of discussion about behavior and enforcement that I’m not including here.) This is the caliber of thought that goes into the opinions on bike policy written by the Daily News…

Alex Nazaryan:

Well, at this point, New Yorkers don’t really seem to want bike lanes. So enforcement might just be the thing to get people over on the side of bikers. You don’t want them to been as mavericks.

Participants then referred Alex to the recent public opinion polling by Quinnipiac, which found 59 percent support for adding bike lanes, and Marist, which found 66 percent support for bike lanes among NYC adults.

Alex Nazaryan:

The vast majority of the letters we get from ordinary New Yorkers seem to indicate otherwise. Not really sure if Marist poll is indicative.

I tried to post this response, but it wasn’t published: “Alex, both the Marist poll and the Quinnipiac polls that found tremendous support for bike lanes were conducted using statistically rigorous methodology. Letters to the Daily News do not constitute a rigorous survey of NYC opinion.”

But the moderators did run this from reader JBK:

NYDN believes it’s letters section is more reliable than Marist?

Alex Nazaryan (separate comments):

Our letter-writers are ordinary New Yorkers who live and work here, especially in the outer borough. You discount their opinions at your own peril.

There is another issue: the people who have, as a rule, wanted bike lanes are wealthier residents of Manhattan and brownstone Brooklyn. I just don’t know of that much demand in, say, East Elmhurst.

Mike Epstein:

Alex: Perhaps you’ve not noticed the HUGE groundswell of demand (and support) for bike lanes in East Harlem? Stereotypes are easy, but often false.

Station44025:

Alex, that’s also not true. Last Marist poll showed over 70% approval for bike lanes among hispanic and poor.

Streetsblog:

Alex, they’ve been enthusiastically building out the bike network in the South Bronx for years. Low income New Yorkers tend not to own cars and adding safe cycling facilities helps get around, in addition to a robust transit network.

Alex Nazaryan:

Look, the truth it, Manhattan cannot ever be Madison or Austin, so I think there’s just a little dissonance here. As much as it’s great that people are biking, I do ultimately feel that the city can only take so much.

Streetsblog:

Alex, Manhattan and most of the rest of NYC is a much more conducive environment for cycling than Madison or Austin. The destinations are much more closely together, so we’re making shorter trips. The more trips we make by bike instead of by car, the more space will open up on the roads.

Alex Nazaryan:

I just think a lot of people come to this city and want to remake it in their own image. And the truth is, it’s a city where millions upon millions of people come on a daily basis to make a living. It’s hard to fit bikes into the scenario

Naomi:

I am pedestrian, transit-rider and cyclist. The narrative that has been framed by the Daily seems awfully narrow-minded and seems to be missing a much larger issue: Equity. As most of our urban core’s working-class residents are not motorists – consideration, space and funding for other infrastructure is needed.

Naparstek:

Wow, Alexander: That’s just a crazy statement. First off, NYC is constantly being remade into the image of new immigrants. That is *the story* of NYC. That’s what this ciy is all about. The Lower East Side morphs from Jewish to Italian to Chinese… Etc Etc in every neighborhood. When NYC stops transforming, it stops being NYC.

Alex Nazaryan:

Napartsek: I take an issue with both your tone and your facts. I think there’s a sense of entitlement among the “creative classes” that was not present in, say, immigrants from Poland or wherever else. You can’t just move here and expect that all of Brooklyn is going to become a greenway.

Streetsblog (comment did not get published):

Alex, you continue to pound the theme that only transplants, Manhattanites, and the “creative class” support bike infrastructure, in the face of recent public opinion data showing strong support among low income New Yorkers and voters in the Bronx, Queens, and Brooklyn.

mst:

what do bike lanes have to do with “creative classes”? Bike lanes are used by people of all walks of life

Alex Nazaryan:

Not in my experience

megadonn1

…Drivers have to pay insurance, registration fees, etc. why don’t we do the same for cyclist. Make them register their bikes. Compel them to carry insurance. License them to operate their bikes on city streets…

JBK:

@megadonn1 – there is no reason to compel cyclist insurance because the cost to the cyclist of such insurance would be almost zero – no insurance company would be able to make a profit doing so. This is because cyclists cannot cause the massive damage cars can.

Alex Nazaryan:

Um, bikes can kill people too.

Kristina Rodriguez-Fowle:

all cyclists dont wear spandex and have 100 dollar shoes just for cycling. I wear my pj’s, my helmet and some regular shoes and go do some grocery shopping…i obey laws, i am cautious, i am a wife and mother..my family bikes with me. we are regular people who are too broke to have a car or take taxi’s. We are aware of all that can go wrong…I know we are not the only ones..do we not deserve a way to get to the market safely and quickly?

  • Clarence Eckerson

    Living in Jackson Heights right adjacent to East Elmurst, I’ll respond directly to Alex’s offhand comment about the people of East Elmhurst probably not demanding bike lanes.  Just as an example of some desperate education that is needed…

    Since moving here – and this is as cultural diverse an area in NYC you will get – I have been surprised over the years seeing more and more people riding bicycles.  In the last two years it has been incredible, now I see moms and families riding bikes in Jackson Heights and East Elmhurst.  NEVER thought I would see that a few years ago.  

    Of course none of the people I see riding bikes are your typical Daily News letter writer.  But you can bet they want bike lanes.  If there were more there would be plenty more folks riding.  I challenge Alex – come over and ride the 34th Avenue Bike Lane.  These days it is filled with bicyclists at all times of the day.  Again, having helped plan the NYC Century Ride thru the years and scouted here in the late 90s and early 2000s, I rarely saw anyone riding the lanes in my travels.

    There is demand for bike lanes everywhere.  Alex should listen to the poll.  NY Daily News writers are not an accurate snapshot of anything, except that they have a pen or a computer and want to write letters.

  • Marge Inovera

    The most disconcerting thing in this whole silly exchange is that a member of the Daily News’s editorial board has absolutely no understanding of sampling and statistics and projectable data.

  • Andy

    He might as well just admit that they have the data but refuse to accept it.

  • Moser

    So the guy’s a total dick with this own bias and “thesis” just like every other “journalist” covering NYC issues…

  • Well since you guys are too polite to say it: I can’t believe that a grown adult who sits on the editorial board of a major NYC newspaper can comport himself that way. It takes an amazing lack of self-awareness to put your foot in your mouth over and over and continue to insist it’s a sandwich. I mean, it’s just clownish, a scandal in its own right, that this is the kind of critical thinking NYDN hires for its editorial page. 

    It may be a cheap shot (and the kind of thing you read in the NYDN), but it’s small wonder newspapers are a dying business. At very least, this editorial board is clearly used to making up its own facts and substituting its prejudices for critical analyses, probably because they’re rarely held accountable. 

    I mean, that you had to tell him that letters to the editor do not constitute any kind of fact about public opinion is just insane.

  • Facts are the inconvenient enemy of narrative.

  • buddyguy

    What a schmuck. He looks like a hilpster too!

  • KeNYC2030

    It matters not how many members of the DN’s editorial board ride bikes or what they may personally believe is best for the city.  What matters is whom they consider to be their core readership and what they believe that readership’s interests and prejudices to be.  Clearly, they see their core as motorists or those who aspire to be such, and who view the bicycling boom as at best an inconvenience and at worst a threat to their way of life. The DN can have all the lunchtime chat sessions it wants, but it will continue catering to that perceived constituency until it either goes out of business or senses, probably through its tide of letters, that its constituency has shifted.   

  • KeNYC2030

    It matters not how many members of the DN’s editorial board ride bikes or what they may personally believe is best for the city.  What matters is whom they consider to be their core readership and what they believe that readership’s interests and prejudices to be.  Clearly, they see their core as motorists or those who aspire to be such, and who view the bicycling boom as at best an inconvenience and at worst a threat to their way of life. The DN can have all the lunchtime chat sessions it wants, but it will continue catering to that perceived constituency until it either goes out of business or senses, probably through its tide of letters, that its constituency has shifted.   

  • God, I was part of this live chat (my handle was AlexandraAiello) and I was appalled at the way the discussion was going. It is a NO BRAINER that there should be more bike lanes in New York City. 

    But I will refrain from saying anything more. That conversation had me close to going off of the roof.

  • I found the implication that “real” new yorkers don’t ride bicycles deeply offensive.

  • I found the implication that “real” new yorkers don’t ride bicycles deeply offensive.

  • Guest

    This guy is an editorial board member of a daily newspaper? How depressing. He goes out of his way to ignore facts and instead takes a completely reactionary and emotional approach to the issue, one colored by all sorts of phony stererotypes. When someone dares to object to the ridiculous idea that bike lanes are only used by the “creative classes” (whatever that means) his response is “not in my experience.” That’s all you’ve got? I see a lot of deliverymen in the bike lanes — not exactly hipsters on fixies. But I also see people of all ages on all sorts of bikes and in all sorts of attire. His flip response to the issue of the damage cars can cause is “Um, bikes can kill people too.” Technically correct! A cyclist kills a pedestrian roughly once every other year in New York City. Cars on the other hand kill nearly 300 people a year in New York City. Has this guy read any of the numerous studies that show bikes lanes make cities safer for pedestrians and even lower the incidence of pedestrians killed by cars? Doubt it. Anyway – depressing as I say. The Daily News used to be the New York paper that celebrated the diversity of the city and there really isn’t a more democratic form of transportation than the bicycle, save perhaps the feet. This guy should take his puerile tone and aversion to facts to the NY Post, where he’d fit right in.

  • Anonymous

    The only light came when Alex asked Aaron N why he bikes knowing it is dangerous. I may be reading too much into it but it seemed like he was perhaps begrudgingly willing to recognize cyclists as legitimate street users with legitimate concerns about their safety.

  • Anonymous

    This guy cannot be this ignorant and unwilling to listen.  Clearly, this is all about creating hype and selling newspapers.  Just look at the headlines compared to the video of his bike ride.

  • carma

    This was not a debate when everyone except for alex was pro bike lane and arguing for it.  it can only be a debate when both sides are equally represented.   for that, you need to let the opposition get on the debate too.  and why was it unfairly represented.  most of the panel on the debate were from sb.  and it became a bloodbath.

    its like going into a mosque and preaching christianity.

    to me, its great that most here are going to give rave reviews of the new lanes, but lets also here it from the opposition who oppose it.  then, you can truly debate.

  • TommyM

    Reading this, it’s maddening the assumptions he makes and stubbondly clings to about what advocates for safe streets are seeking and who benefits from safer streets. Remake the city? Creative Class? Manahattan will never be Madison?
    Yep it’s just the hipsters/artists who want to remove every last car from the city so they can bike to Lollipalooza and their Rave Parties, while the fair and hardworking citizens of Elmhurst prefer crowded subways/buses while their children choke on exhaust fumes and confine their excercise to the neighborhood playground. That’s what the Letters to the Editor say! Hooray for uninformed opinion!

  • Matches

    I find it interesting that he wrote on the boards “For the record, not a single person on the Editorial Board drives to work. And several of us are regular bikers.”

    I wish one of their ‘regular bikers’ had made a comment as an editorial staff, instead of Alex.  I mean, this sounds rude, but he obviously wasn’t one of the regular bikers, as you can see him huffing and puffing all the way up the bridge.  I don’t understand how someone can be a regular biker and not see the safety benefits of bike lanes and room for all kinds of diverse transport…it’s a beautiful thing and a no-brainer.And if the issue was something along the lines of “cyclists: friend or foe” they should have labeled it that way instead of “bikelanes: good or evil”

  • Anonymous

    @Geck:disqus 

    Alex asked Aaron why he bikes knowing it is dangerous in response to Aaron who had said just earlier.I

    I own a car. I ride the subway and bus. I walk a lot. I haul two kids on a cargo bike to school and the park every week. I use every mode of transportation that we have in this city. And you know what my personal experience is? On the whole, cyclists are the most responsible, careful and aware of all street users. Because if they’re not, they can get killed. Cyclists have the smallest margin for error. It is impossible to “pretend you have no responsibility” on a bike. To the contrary: When I’m biking I know that the responsibility is entirely my own. And if I get hit by a car and killed, the police and press will probably make me responsible for that too.”

    Which was in response to Alex having said: 

     It goes without saying, we don’t want bikers to be hurt. Certainly, as someone who does bike around the city, I want to feel like a part of the streetscape. But it’s disingenuous for bikers to pretend that they have no responsibility.

  • Anonymous

    When Alex said bikes kill people to I posted “what are the numbers? How many people get killed by cyclist as a posed to cars” of course that didn’t get published.

  • @d8d46f16f380afef59ca318522397233:disqus : That’s a chivalrous approach to debate, except really here there is little coherent opposition to the current bicycle network plan. People can nitpick about individual cyclists (some are jerks) and individual street layouts (the ones with the worst problems are never debated, the ones with no problems are ALWAYS debated). But the end result is that the city could use a bicycle lane network, so far the network in-place has not perceptibly affected traffic flow (in some cases installations of “complete streets” features has optimized it – adding flow for congested areas and slowing flow for speeding zones), and there’s room for plenty more bike lanes and cyclists. This is not coming at the expense of motorists. There’s little anyone can feasibly do to help most vehicle congestion anyway, and even without bicycles more people should be riding the subway. I’ve found that most anti-bike-lane arguments rely on fallacies or inaccurate facts. What are they really arguing, anyway?  I often talk to people from out-of-town, and they ask me about this “debate” as if it’s the most insane thing in the world for people to argue about. Bicycle lanes make sense. Established transportation-planning habits from the 1950’s have been proven to NOT make sense. But even someone who knows nothing about transportation planning thinks that letting people have another city-friendly transport option is a good idea. Which is why it was jarring to see someone high-ranking at a major metro newspaper argue the exact opposite, as if he believed the Sisyphean task of accommodating increased motor vehicle traffic into our CBDs to match regional population growth was the only strategy that worked for the general public. The reality is that it’s the only strategy that will NEVER work.

  • Guest

    I just don’t get it. What is wrong with people? Why are they so upset by bike lanes?  What is in it for this guy to be so willfully ignorant over this issue? Why are there so many like him? What the hell am I missing? Man, I have yet to even bike in this city. I cannot imagine how incredibly frustrating it must be to read this bullshit… 

  • Driver

    “The only light came when Alex asked Aaron N why he bikes knowing it is dangerous.”

    I tried to comment on this one but it didn’t get published. 
    I tried to point out that thousands of people die every year in cars in this country (that doesn’t even address the number of seriously injured), yet we have no problem choosing to drive.

  • Anonymous

    I think this was the most revealing of all of Alex’s comments:

     I just think a lot of people come to this city and want to remake it in their own image. And the truth is, it’s a city where millions upon millions of people come on a daily basis to make a living. It’s hard to fit bikes into the scenario.

    [Naparstak responded to the “remake . . . in their own image” part, but, not the second part]

    Like, I’m one of those “millions upon millions of people who come [into the city] on a daily basis to make a living.”  But, since I prefer to bike (instead of being packed on a train and beholden to the train schedule), I somehow don’t count?  I already bike to freaking work.  My employer provides showers so I’m not covered in sweat.   I mean, what drugs is this guy smoking?  

    I mean it’s just absurd.  I don’t cease being a New Yorker as soon as I hop on my bike, do I?  I have a NYS driver’s license.  I work in New York City.  I pay the ridiculous NYC taxes.  I bike because I sit at a desk most of the day and bike commuting allows me to stay in relatively good shape.  I mean, why does this guy have to make it a Class issue, or a “us v. them” issue.  And frankly, this guy is terribly mis-informed.  You can have a mountain of traffic calming data and polls showing support, but, he’d go to the mat with the anti-bike ranter going on and on about licensing and registering or that one time someone he knows was hit by a biker and was stuck with the bill.

  • mikesonn

    It’s like talking to Rob Anderson, but a version with a much larger readership. Alex continues to ignore facts and reality to push an agenda.

  • Driver

    “On the whole, cyclists are the most responsible, careful and aware of all street users. Because if they’re not, they can get killed.” I feel a similar sentiment about pedestrians in the street, (not the most careful and aware part, but the possibility of getting killed part).  Unfortunately pedestrians don’t always act as if this is the case.

  • J

    This is really frustrating. I’ve been tossing this around in my mind, and I think the problem is one of perception. The staff at the Daily News editorial board takes the subway, walks, and reads letters for their predominantly outer-borough readership. That is their world, and it strongly shapes how they perceive things. The polls showing support for bike lanes don’t fit with their world view, and they therefore reject them. The concerns about bad behavior on the part of drivers and pedestrians are not immediately apparent to them, and they reject them. The same can be said for many of our politicians and police officers, who simply cannot fathom riding a bicycle and therefore reject the notion outright or treat it as some sort of niche of crazies.

    To combat this problem, what really needs to happen is for people like Alex to start biking to work. Then, they would actually see the freedom gained by biking, the problems that currently exist for biking, and the different methods employed to improve things. There are so many small details about biking that you couldn’t possibly notice or understand until you experienced them while on a bike. Can Streetsblog challenge Alex and other editors to a week of biking to work. It’s green and a good workout. Plus it would let them experience the world the way many of us do. I get angry at these attack articles, but I don’t think that attacking the writers is a good strategy. It seems to be simply causing them to retrench their views and dismiss everything we are saying, facts included, since we fit into their worldview of elitist, entitled bikers. We need to engage them, not by attacking them on blogs and twitter, but by taking them on bike rides through the streets. They have shown that they are willing, and I think we need to take a more amicable next step.

  • Driver

     J, you need them to bike to work for two weeks.  One week biking with traffic on streets without bike lanes, and one week riding on routes with protected lanes.  Having them bike on protected lanes won’t highlight the problems cyclists face without the lanes.  Having them bike with traffic should be an eye opener, 

  • Driver

     J, you need them to bike to work for two weeks.  One week biking with traffic on streets without bike lanes, and one week riding on routes with protected lanes.  Having them bike on protected lanes won’t highlight the problems cyclists face without the lanes.  Having them bike with traffic should be an eye opener, 

  • Outer Borough Commenter

    This guy Alex Nazaryan is an off-the-charts embarrassment to the Daily News. How did he ever get to be an editorial writer for the paper? He should be sacked for his performance today in the online chat.

  • Alex Nazaryan, a guy who grew up in West Hartford, Connecticut, went to Dartmouth and moved to Bushwick. No wonder he claims only transplants bike. They’re probably the only people this child of the suburbs knows in New York.

  • Alex Nazaryan, a guy who grew up in West Hartford, Connecticut, went to Dartmouth and moved to Bushwick. No wonder he claims only transplants bike. They’re probably the only people this child of the suburbs knows in New York.

  • thank you!

  • Anonymous

    Yes, by his own definition of a Real New Yorker, Alex Nazaryan is a complete fraud.  He’s a young transplant member of the creative classes* trying to re-make the city (in which a large majority support bike lanes) conform to his own nostalgic vision of the Giuliani era (which ended before he graduated from Dartmouth in 2002) when there were almost no bike lanes, the Quality of Life Campaign was punishing people for the most minor infractions, and dancing was banned from the city.

    Surely, he tosses and turns in a fitful sleep at night, dreaming of pulling on a pair of skinnies and a Cinelli cap, sticking a krypto in his belt, and running light after light, free as the wind on his vintage steel fixie, only to wake up in a cold sweat and remember the crushing reality of another day of desperately trying to assimilate with the hard-boiled hard-drinking cynics of the old tabloid era, who, in the end, will never really accept him. 

    Just get a bike and finish your novel, Alex.  Stop being a pugilist for the sake of pugilism–you’ll be a happier person.

    *Full disclosure: I am those things, except less young, and hopefully not a fraud.

  • Anonymous

    Alex, if you’re reading this:  Before you get all offended by my ad hominem attack below (which is hysterically funny, btw) and take it out on all cyclists, I want to be clear that it is motivated by the fact that your editorial page and your comments during the lunch-time chat often attempt to divide New Yorkers by class, borough, length of residency and origin.  By your own standards, you yourself are barely entitled to express an opinion about anything, let alone be the editor of an “opinion page.”  So, let’s just not pre-judge each other, ok? 

    I submitted a comment to the chat that was not published that you have a great responsibility in shaping the discourse in NYC, and you have used that power to stir up resentments that translate into real, physical aggression on the part of drivers in the streets.  Not a joke or an exaggeration. We are real people. Working stiffs, couriers, bankers, writers, teachers, doctors, ems medics, cops, etc., and you are making cycling more dangerous for us.  Take some responsibility for your words and your thoughts, and try to make NYC better by helping us all get along rather than wedging us apart.

  • Anonymous

    Alex, if you’re reading this:  Before you get all offended by my ad hominem attack below (which is hysterically funny, btw) and take it out on all cyclists, I want to be clear that it is motivated by the fact that your editorial page and your comments during the lunch-time chat often attempt to divide New Yorkers by class, borough, length of residency and origin.  By your own standards, you yourself are barely entitled to express an opinion about anything, let alone be the editor of an “opinion page.”  So, let’s just not pre-judge each other, ok? 

    I submitted a comment to the chat that was not published that you have a great responsibility in shaping the discourse in NYC, and you have used that power to stir up resentments that translate into real, physical aggression on the part of drivers in the streets.  Not a joke or an exaggeration. We are real people. Working stiffs, couriers, bankers, writers, teachers, doctors, ems medics, cops, etc., and you are making cycling more dangerous for us.  Take some responsibility for your words and your thoughts, and try to make NYC better by helping us all get along rather than wedging us apart.

  • Anonymous

    Alex, if you’re reading this:  Before you get all offended by my ad hominem attack below (which is hysterically funny, btw) and take it out on all cyclists, I want to be clear that it is motivated by the fact that your editorial page and your comments during the lunch-time chat often attempt to divide New Yorkers by class, borough, length of residency and origin.  By your own standards, you yourself are barely entitled to express an opinion about anything, let alone be the editor of an “opinion page.”  So, let’s just not pre-judge each other, ok? 

    I submitted a comment to the chat that was not published that you have a great responsibility in shaping the discourse in NYC, and you have used that power to stir up resentments that translate into real, physical aggression on the part of drivers in the streets.  Not a joke or an exaggeration. We are real people. Working stiffs, couriers, bankers, writers, teachers, doctors, ems medics, cops, etc., and you are making cycling more dangerous for us.  Take some responsibility for your words and your thoughts, and try to make NYC better by helping us all get along rather than wedging us apart.

  • Anonymous

    Alex, if you’re reading this:  Before you get all offended by my ad hominem attack below (which is hysterically funny, btw) and take it out on all cyclists, I want to be clear that it is motivated by the fact that your editorial page and your comments during the lunch-time chat often attempt to divide New Yorkers by class, borough, length of residency and origin.  By your own standards, you yourself are barely entitled to express an opinion about anything, let alone be the editor of an “opinion page.”  So, let’s just not pre-judge each other, ok? 

    I submitted a comment to the chat that was not published that you have a great responsibility in shaping the discourse in NYC, and you have used that power to stir up resentments that translate into real, physical aggression on the part of drivers in the streets.  Not a joke or an exaggeration. We are real people. Working stiffs, couriers, bankers, writers, teachers, doctors, ems medics, cops, etc., and you are making cycling more dangerous for us.  Take some responsibility for your words and your thoughts, and try to make NYC better by helping us all get along rather than wedging us apart.

  • Anonymous

    Alex, if you’re reading this:  Before you get all offended by my ad hominem attack below (which is hysterically funny, btw) and take it out on all cyclists, I want to be clear that it is motivated by the fact that your editorial page and your comments during the lunch-time chat often attempt to divide New Yorkers by class, borough, length of residency and origin.  By your own standards, you yourself are barely entitled to express an opinion about anything, let alone be the editor of an “opinion page.”  So, let’s just not pre-judge each other, ok? 

    I submitted a comment to the chat that was not published that you have a great responsibility in shaping the discourse in NYC, and you have used that power to stir up resentments that translate into real, physical aggression on the part of drivers in the streets.  Not a joke or an exaggeration. We are real people. Working stiffs, couriers, bankers, writers, teachers, doctors, ems medics, cops, etc., and you are making cycling more dangerous for us.  Take some responsibility for your words and your thoughts, and try to make NYC better by helping us all get along rather than wedging us apart.

  • Anonymous

    Alex, if you’re reading this:  Before you get all offended by my ad hominem attack below (which is hysterically funny, btw) and take it out on all cyclists, I want to be clear that it is motivated by the fact that your editorial page and your comments during the lunch-time chat often attempt to divide New Yorkers by class, borough, length of residency and origin.  By your own standards, you yourself are barely entitled to express an opinion about anything, let alone be the editor of an “opinion page.”  So, let’s just not pre-judge each other, ok? 

    I submitted a comment to the chat that was not published that you have a great responsibility in shaping the discourse in NYC, and you have used that power to stir up resentments that translate into real, physical aggression on the part of drivers in the streets.  Not a joke or an exaggeration. We are real people. Working stiffs, couriers, bankers, writers, teachers, doctors, ems medics, cops, etc., and you are making cycling more dangerous for us.  Take some responsibility for your words and your thoughts, and try to make NYC better by helping us all get along rather than wedging us apart.

  • Mike

    Oh, I just realized why I want more bike lanes.  It’s because I’m a young transplant, even though my great-grandmother owned a hat store in Downtown Brooklyn 100 years ago.

  • Mike

    Oh, I just realized why I want more bike lanes.  It’s because I’m a young transplant, even though my great-grandmother owned a hat store in Downtown Brooklyn 100 years ago.

  • John W

    If he didn’t work for the News i’d have said don’t feed the troll, he’s arguing just cos…

  • Brigita_radeljak

    Hello
    I am a Danish student from KEA Design & Business in Copenhagen writing my final paper about bicycling culture in New York City. I am trying to find out whether N.Y. is the right market for a Danish bicycling shop. IF YOU LIVE IN NEW YORK – Please help me get some response on my survey. It will only take 2 minutes of your time. Thank you Just click on the link:http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/9XNGGNV

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The Daily News Settles It: NYC Needs More Protected Bike Lanes

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Strip the conclusions from Alex Nazaryan’s bike lane review in yesterday’s Daily News — by my count, the 434th “Vicious Cycle” headline of the past three years — and you actually come away with some observations about NYC streets that I think most people who bike in the city would agree with. Nazaryan, you may […]

Today’s Headlines

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A Peek at Four Visions for Penn Station From Architecture Firms Selected by MAS (NYT) 2nd Ave Sagas Blasts Bill Perkins For Obstructing 125th Street Bus Improvements CB 12 Requested Uptown Bike Lanes, So Daily News Went on a Hunt for People Who Oppose Them No Longer Under Arthur Browne‘s Wing, Alex Nazaryan Believes in […]