Construction Narrows Brooklyn Bridge Bike-Ped Path

Narrow.JPGDuring the Brooklyn Bridge rehab, stretches of the 14-foot-wide bike-ped path will be narrowed to 11 feet. Photo: Noah Kazis

Heads up if you bike or walk across the Brooklyn Bridge: Rehab work slated to last until 2014 is narrowing the promenade from 14 feet to 11 feet.

Right now, paint removal work has narrowed part of the bike path by a foot and a half. A similar "paint removal containment unit" will soon be installed on the pedestrian side. The narrowed section of the path, which will fluctuate between 600 and 1000 feet long, will shift as the paint removal work moves along the bridge. DOT has already installed signs telling cyclists to dismount.

For what it’s worth, none of the cyclists I saw on the bridge dismounted and everything seemed to work fine. But that wasn’t during peak commute hours, and the other side of the path hadn’t been narrowed yet. It may be worth going even more out of your way to take the Manhattan Bridge, but that route will have its own construction headaches starting at the end of this year. 

If you have any suggestions for the Brooklyn Bridge construction managers about how to make the best of a tight space that’s about to get even more cramped, email brooklynbridgeoutreach@gmail.com.

Dismount_1.JPGDismount signs are up in both directions. Photo: Noah Kazis

  • TKO

    It’s going to get rough. At least the summer is almost over the cold it gets the less cyclists and tourists on the bridge.

  • Pete

    What’s the DOT saying about all of this? Both the Manhattan and Brooklyn Bridges are a big part of the bicycle network, and crimping both of them as severely as they are is going to have a major impact on bicycle ridership.

    Can anyone get an on-the-record comment from JSK or someone else at DOT or the Mayor’s office about this?

  • Ian Turner

    Would DOT take away a vehicular lane for four years? The obvious response here would be to do just that and give bicycles their own two-way separated path on the roadway.

    –Ian

  • Zmapper

    My solution to the Brooklyn Bridge Bike Congestion™.
    http://goo.gl/maps/niC5

  • Ian Turner

    On the other hand, an automobile lane carries about 20,000 vehicles per day, while the bicycle lanes only carry around 2,600 bicycles per day.

  • nobody

    Take away an automobile lane anyway. I’m tired of bending over backwards for drivers.

  • Zmapper

    Does anyone know if a pedestrian count has been done on the Brooklyn Bridge and what the results are?

  • vnm

    Note to self: Use Manhattan Bridge.

  • Ian Turner

    Zmapper: Excellent question. According to DOT, it’s 4,000 pedestrians per day, so 6,200 non-motorists in total.

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