Today’s Headlines

  • NYers React to Looming Transit Cutbacks (NYT 1, 2, News 1, 2, Post 1, 2)
  • Walder Hints at Layoffs; Incoming TWU Prez Balks (News)
  • Paterson: Public Distrusts MTA Because It Isn’t "Profitable" (Daily Politics)
  • Use Capital Funds to Bolster Operating Budget? Reasonable People Disagree (GG)
  • Cabbies Cry Foul as TLC Approves New Distracted Driving Rules (NYT, NY1, News)
  • Bloomberg Accepts Council Rejection of Kingsbridge Armory Mall, Then Vetoes It (WNYC, Post)
  • $20M Stimulus Allocation to Bronx Hospital Results in More Parking, Fewer Jobs (News)
  • Missing Sign Sows Parking Chaos in Prospect Heights; Don’t Miss the Bklyn Paper URL
  • Brooklyn Motorists Show Flagrant Regard for Maple Street Bike Lane (Gothamist)
  • Markowitz $250K Parking Lot Slip-and-Fall Settlement Raises Eyebrows (News)
  • Walkable Development: The Most Direct Route to Curbing Auto Emissions (Globe)

More headlines at Streetsblog Capitol Hill

  • JK

    “It is now beyond dysfunction. It is madness, or something.”

    Sen. Elizabeth Little, R-Queensbury (North of Albany.)A 14 year member of the NY state senate and assembly, referring to the current state of New York State government.

    http://www.poststar.com/news/local/article_36e900f0-eb50-11de-b55a-001cc4c002e0.html

  • Larry Littlefield

    Sounds like Russianoff has “solved” the problem for the state legislature. Cut maintenance, borrow money, hide the problem, and claimed to be heroes who saved the system this year.

    And next year.

    And the year after.

    And when the consequenes come due in a way that will take years to erase, those men of the people will complain about that, too.

    Why is disaster in five or ten years better than inconveniece today? Perhaps because that’s five or ten years to keep grabbing and then depart.

    He says the idea would be to buy time to give Albany a chance to find a long term solution. But ending maintenance and borrowing money is the solution for Albany.

  • J. Mork

    I want to be pro-labor, but you know what? I didn’t get a raise this year, and when my company isn’t pulling in enough revenue, they lay people off. So it’s hard to have sympathy for a union who fought tooth and nail for raises and benefits that the MTA just can’t afford. I’m all for layoffs.

  • Would Lt. Gov. Ravitch, who has already saved the MTA once, be able to persuade Gov. Paterson to veto a plan that took money from the capital budget to fill the operating gaps?

  • Ian Turner

    Walder is doing a good job handling the media. Not one of the six articles linked above blamed the MTA for the cuts; they just stated the facts.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Look, is anyone else seeing the future as I now see it?

    If you drive a car when you have better alternative, you are being a selfish person by contributing to congestion and pollution. But if you rely on mass transit, you are at the mercy of selfish people, which in this era are abundant in and in control. So while it’s worth putting up a fight, one should not expect to win. Efforts should be primarily directed elsewhere.

    Thus, I suggest a program to lease high school and middle school kids, at a low cost, simple bicycles and accessories (helmet, lock, safety vest, lights), for trips of less than 10 miles. Once they get used to it, they’ll probably keep doing it as adults.

    The alternative is the city paying for student transportation in the city, and the state (using taxes collected in the city) paying for it in the rest of the state. The city gets very little state school transportation funding — the state fleecedthe MTA instead.

    And how about the bus cuts? These will leave Windsor Terrace with little bus service north and west on weekdays, and none on weekends. But the B75 and B69 were so infrequent and unreliable that you wonder how much was lost. As far as I’m concerned, that separted bike lane along Prospect Park and a bike lane on Vanderbilt is better than the B69, and the parking obstructed bike lane on 9th Street is better than the B75.

  • Boris

    “The parking is just beyond the sign, in lots made vacant three decades ago when the urban renewal program tore down hundreds of homes and businesses. All attempts to build there have met the two letter word that rules Shelly World.

    “NO.”

    When a newspaper switches alliances, it can be vicious.

    http://www.nydailynews.com/news/2009/12/17/2009-12-17_yes_shelly_you_owe_kids_a_fareless_trip_to_school.html?page=0#ixzz0a3kVuARO

  • Larry Littlefield

    (All attempts to build there have met the two letter word that rules Shelly World. “NO.”)

    Silver’s yeses have been far more damaging.

  • If you drive a car when you have better alternative, you are being a selfish person by contributing to congestion and pollution. But if you rely on mass transit, you are at the mercy of selfish people, which in this era are abundant in and in control.

    Indeed. Larry, that’s a great quote. Don’t forget, there are also the selfish passengers who hold doors, take up extra seats, and exit through buses’ front doors.

    I’ve never found as succinct a rationale for why I despise taking mass transit.

  • Larry Littlefield

    Bloomberg, you ain’t seen nothing yet:

    http://www.nydailynews.com/blogs/dailypolitics/2009/12/bloomberg-think-this-is-bad-yo.html#comments

    He was talking about the MTA, but many other public services will be affected. He was talking about March 2010, but I expect the real disasters to be deferred until November of that year, or perhaps January or March 2011.

  • J. Mork

    Is the federal money still available for a city that wants to implement congestion pricing? NYC missed the deadline before, but I don’t believe any other city has yet claimed it.

    (NYC was planning to beef up bus service in advance of congestion pricing, as a way to increase the supply of transit to accomodate ex-drivers. Bloomberg, I think, refers to this money in the article that Larry linked above.)