This Week in Livable Streets Events

This week we have competing Tuesday evening events, followed by the big Tri-State Transportation Campaign fund-raiser on Thursday. But first, TA and TSTC team up for what could be a momentous discussion on traffic justice.

Keep an eye on the calendar for updated listings. Got an event we should know about? Drop us a line.

  • Tom

    I think it’s insane to vote for Bloomberg just because we all love Janette Sadik-Khan. Term limits is a serious issue. Democracy is a serious issue. Buying the city is a serious issue. Police harassment of bicyclists is a serious issue. A million new trees? I haven’t seen one. What I have seen is a million new condos.

  • Luckily, livable streets advocates can cast a guilt-free protest vote for Rev Billy.

  • Ian Turner

    Tom,

    I agree that there is a lot to complain about with respect to Bloomberg, but it’s not enough to say “you can’t vote for him because of x, y, and z”. You have to look at the alternatives. Thompson is a jackass. Talen has a lot to commend him on the civil rights end of things, but his plans for development, housing, public health, crime, and public debt are alternatively dumb or nonexistant. I’m planning to vote for Bloomberg, and I’m pretty sure my sanity is not in question.

    Cheers,

    –Ian

  • vnm

    Tom, I hope a million new condos were built in NYC. Such construction would have prevented the uprooting or chopping down of maybe tens of millions of trees to make way for housing in suburban greenfields. And the resulting housing would be transit-accessible. Housing growth in NYC is to be praised, and is probably a bigger environmental benefit than the million trees planted here. (Of which I’ve seen tons, by the way.)

  • Does nobody here agree with me that New York City proper is too dense, that organic growth yields Brooklyn-scale neighborhoods, that skyscrapers belong in business districts, and that condo towers are awful?

    I live in a four-storey walkup brownstone on a treelined street and I think it’s the ideal arrangement for human society. Manhattan’s too damn dense.

  • James Howard Kunstler agrees with you. But I find NY townhouses constricted and depressing. I prefer prewar apartment buildings of 10 to 15 stories, with spacious rooms and high ceilings. Elevators are nice when you have a heavy bag of groceries or someone is delivering a sofabed.

  • Kaja

    Yeah, they were less cramped before they were all divided in half on the short axis during ’60s renovations, destroying the spatiousness and the crossbreeze both. Floorthroughs are proper.

  • Tom

    Yeah, unoccupied housing for the super elite rich saves so much “suburban greenfields” that we almost have two new greenfields! And why not just kill anyone making less than $100,000 a year so they don’t move elsewhere when Bloomy’s landlord buddies kick them out. That would also mean more votes for the uber-rich! Yay! Winners!

  • Ian Turner

    Tom,

    Rich people don’t materialize out of nowhere; if they are moving into new buildings then they are vacating older ones. Adding housing stock is the only way to avert housing shortages; any housing plan that doesn’t include the construction of lots of new housing is a war against reality, impossible to win.

  • Tom

    I said unoccupied. And if you don’t turn a neighborhood into nothing but housing for the rich, then the rich won’t come there.

  • Ian Turner

    Tom,

    Unoccupied housing costs a lot of money, I’m sure the owners are taking such a hit because they expect it to pay off soon. Real estate investors are notoriously impatient, so let’s talk in 1-2 years time and see how much housing is unoccupied.

    Note that I’m not opposed to making the city a statutory renter of unoccupied housing stock.

    Cheers,

    –Ian

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