CBS2 Reporter Warns Against Distracted Driving While Driving Distracted

ddgrab.jpg"I am six times more likely to be in a crash right now."

The U.S. DOT’s distracted driving summit, now in its second day, is getting some major nationwide media play. As well it should. New York’s own CBS2 reports that distracted driving claimed the lives of 6,000 people last year.

But in an otherwise fine story, reporter Don Dahler unwittingly demonstrates how easy it is to fall prey to the mindset of drivers who believe everyone else is the problem.

Watch as Dahler films part of his report while driving. By our count, he looks toward the camera seven times as he explains that motorists are six times more likely to be involved in a crash while using a cell phone — i.e. driving distracted.

Sorry to pick on Dahler, but didn’t it occur to anyone at CBS2 that this might not be the best treatment for this particular story?

  • Lars

    Exactly.

  • It is important to think broadly about tackling distracted driving beyond cell phone use and texting. Most distractions are caused by these and other factors, including kids asking questions from the backseat, music on the radio, road signs, reaching for a toll fare and many other distractions inside and outside of the car.

    We won’t be able to legislate, restrict via technology or remove all of the distractions that cause distracted driving so we need to go right to the root cause – the driver’s inability to focus and react quick enough. Research about how the brain works and its impact in driving situations make it clear that brain performance is the biggest factor in driving safely.

    We have found a way to directly impact a driver’s ability to focus and react through brain performance training. In rigorous testing, crash incidence was decreased by an average of 50% in drivers in just 10 hours of specific, computer-based training. Posit Science commercialized this technology in DriveSharp, a brain fitness software product endorsed by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety.

    To make a dent in distracted driving, let’s reward drivers and provide incentives from fleet operators, insurance carriers, car manufacturers and DMV’s for those who take the steps to improve their driving overall.

  • I think that people somehow are lured into thinking that because the vehicle compartment is “at rest” relative to their bodies, they are not traveling at deadly speeds. Multi-tasking while driving is a more dangerous example of this. But we also see it when people drive a few feet away from the car in front while traveling at 60 miles per hour. Far too close to stop if the car in front brakes suddenly.

  • I am an attorney and have a client who was stopped waiting for traffic to clear so that she could turn into her subdivision. Her life was forever changed when a driver who was using her camera phone as she was driving struck my client at 45 miles per hour! Is anyone aware of similar tragedies?

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