Don’t Keep Transit Riders in the Dark, Governor

paterson.jpgMTA CEO Lee Sander, MTA Board Chair Dale Hemmerdinger, and Governor Paterson at a March press conference.

Heading into the weekend, Governor Paterson is still keeping a tight lid on exactly how he plans to handle the MTA’s huge funding shortfall. Lately, Paterson has taken to joking about this crisis by saying that "light bends around Albany" — a not-so-veiled reference to Senate Democrats and their closed-door machinations. I first heard the line a few weeks ago at the RPA Regional Assembly, where we all laughed and ate up the governor’s act.

Well, now it’s the governor himself who’s left everyone in the dark. He’s been dropping hints for days that he has some plan that will win enough votes to clear the Senate, giving no specifics. This is ominous, to say the least. And it makes all those Paterson barbs about statehouse dysfunction seem like so much hypocrisy.

The leaks that have dripped out so far don’t inspire confidence in the governor. Desperate for some development that he can claim as a victory, might he opt for "Deferred Armageddon" — financing even the MTA’s day-to-day operations with borrowed money? If so, the doomsday disaster unfolding today would pale in comparison to what such a plan would set in motion, as more and more of the MTA’s budget gets swallowed up by debt payments. Sounds crazy, right? It also sounds like the kind of "plan" that someone itching for a comeback in the polls would try to keep under wraps as long as possible. 

A year ago, Paterson signaled that he was serious about putting the transit system on solid footing when he chose Richard Ravitch to head the commission on MTA financing. When Ravitch’s commission unveiled its proposals last November, Paterson said, "The ways in which responsibility may have been shirked, or ignored, in
the past, to live for another day — that day has come, and we’re going
to have to make those tough choices."

Now is no time to walk away from that commitment.

  • JK

    Bravo. Well said.

  • christine

    Put the MTA in bankrupcy and sell it to the French .. It works for Chrysler, gets rid of the debt. All the money is due to the same banks that have taken Taxpayers funding ..

    If the Fed can do it for cars, why not for mass transit?

  • Deacon

    They have this huge shortfall right so here’s an idea, why not create congestion charges for New York as they have in London. The powers that be should divide the city into zones and charge according to zone and vehicle type also charge more on the weekend than during the week. That way not only would you get more people getting on public transit to avoid the charges, you wouldn’t have to hike the rates and you make a pretty penny from the people that still continue to drive into the city.

  • It doesn’t matter how good your ideas are Deacon and christine, the politicians are feudal lords and they want you to kneel before them and kiss their ring.

  • Larry Littlefield

    From the New York Times:

    “Mr. Paterson said the authority’s financial situation has deteriorated so rapidly that the rescue plan would no longer provide enough money to address the authority’s long-term fiscal needs. But limiting a fare and toll increase and halting deep service cuts would be enough for now, he said.”

    And I say that was always the plan. Borrow money and hand it out. Let the infrastructure deteriorate. Party on and leave scorched earth behind. Generation Greed.

    You’ll have a tax on wages but not retirement income, to postpone sacrifice from the present to the future, to satisfy a legislature and interests with one foot out the door.

  • W. K. Lis

    As governor, Mr. Paterson would probably be chauffeured around. That reminds me of another person, in previous years, who did not have a driver’s license and was also chauffeured around. Robert Moses was always chauffeured, and he ignored public transit.

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