Today’s Headlines

  • Malcolm Smith Revives ‘Two Sets of Books’ to Question MTA Finances (News, Post)
  • And MTA Provides Its Records to State Leg (NY1)
  • Richard Ravitch Has Albany’s Ear (NYT)
  • The Case for Taxing Vehicle Mileage (WSJ)
  • Shocker: Post Takes Swipe at Bloomberg for ‘Fancy New Sidewalks in Times Square’
  • More on Schumer’s Latest Plan for Moynihan Station (NY1)
  • Brooklyn Bridge Repairs Could Cost NYCDOT $500M (Bklyn Paper)
  • PA Director Chris Ward Wraps Up Q&A With City Room Readers
  • ARC Tunnel Plans Reviewed by Manhattan CBs 4 & 5 (Chelsea Now)
  • Only One Bike-Ped Project Gets Oregon Stim Funds (BikePortland via Streetsblog.net)
  • Larry Littlefield

    The good news for bike riders: the bridge path is clear.

    The bad news for transit riders: the state legislature is working hard to avoid blame for the disaster it created.

    People here are being manipulated. Forget the present, and what they say. Look at the past and what was done, and realize that every one of them is responsible for a near-certain downward spiral of the transit system and economy.

  • Larry Littlefield

    RE: sidewalks.

    It occured to me as I was shoveling yesterday that the city does nothing to maintain the portion of city property used by pedestrians — the sidewalk. No tax dollars are used for them. My guess is that wasn’t always the case.

    Meanwhile, city tax dollars — and not auto-related taxes that go to highways either — are used to maintain and clear and clean the streets used by automobiles. That and fines for illegal parking.

  • brent

    Larry- There is a major problem with the system of making property owners responsible for snow removal. Besides human decency, the motivation to do this work is probably fear of litigation. For some landlords it seems like its worth the risk to not bother. The result is young children and the elderly slipping around while 10 feet away the cars are enjoying a street that has probably been plowed and salted 3 times.

  • Boris

    Since ARC is independent of both Penn Station and Moynihan Station, why is it necessary to build it in the same place so many other things are going on? It would’ve been better to connect it to the World Trade Center (providing a station for the eventual LIRR downtown connection) or some other place. The way things are scheduled to go now, there is the ARC connection to Grand Central and a possible upgrade or new tunnel for Amtrak high-speed trains. In 20 years, the whole 34th St area will be an huge hollow underground cavern.

  • Re: The Case for Taxing Vehicle Mileage

    I get why there’s support for this, as it would directly tax those who are using the roads based on their usage, but isn’t it environmentally regressive?

    If Driver A drives his Prius 100 miles, burning two gallons of gas, and Driver B drives her Hummer 100 miles, burning 10 gallons of gas, they’d pay the same VMT tax. But Driver B would put five times as many global-warming emissions into the air.

    Maybe a hybrid (no pun intended) of a road tax and a gasoline tax would serve us better.

  • Larry Littlefield

    “Since ARC is independent of both Penn Station and Moynihan Station, why is it necessary to build it in the same place so many other things are going on?”

    I’d have considered running it into the Port Authority Bus Terminal, which could have been turned into a join rail-bus terminal called “New Jersey Station.” A track connection to the West Side rail cut could have provided a connection to Penn Station, and an alternative for Amtrak during GOs.

  • Re. “The Case for Taxing Vehicle Mileage”:

    The WSJ’s case for taxing vehicle mileage, if I’m reading this correctly, seems to be that it’s a good end run around the lack of political will to raise the gas tax. There’s a good case to be made for taxing mileage but I’m not sure this is it. (Truth be told, I think the smartest thing to do would be to tax both mileage and gas to some degree.)

  • Re: “Fancy New Sidewalks”

    One of the most commonly voiced concerns about pedestrianization is the alleged potential to affect business negatively. By this line of reasoning, you’d think that cars, rather than real-live humans, were doing the shopping. For as many cars as there are clogging Times Square, there are several times more people, and giving them some walking and breathing space can only help.

    And as the Mayor has said, this is a reversible experiment. With apologies to Mark Twain, reports of Broadway’s death at the hands of more pedestrians have been greatly exaggerated.

  • Geck

    “If Driver A drives his Prius 100 miles, burning two gallons of gas, and Driver B drives her Hummer 100 miles, burning 10 gallons of gas, they’d pay the same VMT tax. But Driver B would put five times as many global-warming emissions into the air.”

    Plus, the Hummer is responsible for more wear and tear on the roads and bridges and poses a greater risk to others from “accidents.”

    So while discourage the number of miles driven with a millage tax has some merit, we also need to encourage the use of smaller more fuel efficient vehicles.

  • Rhywun

    RE: Shocker: Post Takes Swipe at Bloomberg for ‘Fancy New Sidewalks in Times Square’

    I couldn’t even finish that article it was so appalling. I hit this sentence, closed the page in fury and felt like going to wash my hands:

    “Truth is, Bloomberg’s cherished open-spaces crusade has always been a luxury item”

    Apparently no one told the intellectuals who write for the Post that tourism is one of NYC’s top industries.