Today’s Headlines

  • Car Free Nation

    Funny how nobody suggests the obvious solution to the Park Slope parking issue: drop the street cleaning and charge for parking, then use the money to clean the streets by hand. This would be much more convenient for drivers, and would end the dangerous practice of double-parking two to four times a week. It would also free up spots which would end all the endless circulating for parking.

    That nobody inconvenienced by the current parking situation in Park Slope, outside Streetsblog, seems to think of this idea, shows just how dominant the free parking philosophy is.

  • gecko

    Bet sales of a single-person (can expand to increase capacity) very easy-to-use — including mothers with young children, handicapped, elderly — hybrid human-electric vehicle armored with kevlar, carbon fiber, and air bags to protect during crashes weighing less than 100 pounds at the same $2500 price point of Tata Motors car would go viral.

    re: Car Sales Plummet in June (CNN, NYT)

  • Times headline in top link: “Car Sales at 10-Year Low.” And it’s not even my birthday!

  • Has anyone seen this, the train that never stops. Looks like it could be an excellent way to build a highspeed national rail network.

    http://www.carectomy.com/index.php/Train/All-Aboard-the-Train-that-Never-Stops

    Cheers!

  • Re: Community Boards and Summer Saturdays:

    “C.B. 2 has also yet to formally discuss the plan, but Hoylman did not anticipate considerable opposition.

    ‘Community Board 2 favors pedestrians over cars,’ he said, arguing that the traffic effects should be assessed after the event, given its pilot nature. ‘I think the board appreciates this innovative use of streets.'”

    Go CB2!

  • That “train that never stops” is quite clever.

  • gecko

    Similarly, there could be freight barges that never stop on the Hudson and East rivers using tidal currents and even wind power to go up and down the length of Manhattan.

    Small water vehicles can move freight to and from these barges to distribution points along the waterfronts. The same can be done with passengers, though possibly a little too leisurely for some.